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Fabris 12-10-2000 06:41 AM


Hi everyone,

I remember reading a post (I think it was the one about the origins o Ikkyo), and some guy said "didn't O Sensei 'invent' iriminage?" and was criticized.

So I've been wondering: What are the origis of iriminague? Does it come from Daito-ryu or some other art or is it unique to Aikido? My Sensei was an uchideshi of Yasuo Kobayashi and he used to say that Kobayashi always refered to iriminage as the "symbol of Aikido".

Penny for your thoughts.

Fabrício Lemos, Brazil

tedehara 12-12-2000 01:35 PM

Please Clarify
 
Quote:

Fabris wrote:

Hi everyone,

I remember reading a post (I think it was the one about the origins o Ikkyo), and some guy said "didn't O Sensei 'invent' iriminage?" and was criticized.

So I've been wondering: What are the origis of iriminague? Does it come from Daito-ryu or some other art or is it unique to Aikido? My Sensei was an uchideshi of Yasuo Kobayashi and he used to say that Kobayashi always refered to iriminage as the "symbol of Aikido".

Penny for your thoughts.

Fabrício Lemos, Brazil

From what I've been told, Irimi means "entering" and Nage means "throw". Therefore iriminage means "entering throw", a phrase that could apply to many different techniques.

There is one form of iriminage called (Hachi-Noji) figure 8 throw aka the twenty year throw. It's not because it will take you 20 years to learn the throw, but because it took O Sensei 20 years to develop the throw. It might take you more (or less) than 20 years to learn the figure 8 throw. Is this the throw you were wondering about? Or is it another technique?

aiki_what 12-12-2000 02:21 PM

Quote:

Fabris wrote:

So I've been wondering: What are the origis of iriminague?

Fabrício Lemos, Brazil

It is my understanding that irimi-nage was refined from the battlefield technique (weren't they all!) on entering thru an enemy's attack and attempting to break his neck by twisting the helmet violently (which was securely strapped to the head). Obviously the developement of martial "practice" dictated a gentler method.

Any other theories?

Mark


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