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-   -   Odd word (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4162)

Paula Lydon 07-19-2003 11:10 PM

Odd word
 
~~Anyone every hear of the word/title of 'hanshi'? I've been told that it means 'model samuri' but haven't come across it more than once, and don't really understand what model samuri means either.

Thanks!

Bronson 07-19-2003 11:28 PM

Went to Jim Breen's Japanese-English Dictionary Server and searched for hanshi. This is what came up. I had to delete the kanji and whatnot as it doesn't come across after being cut and pasted.

(n) feudal retainer or warrior

(n) half dead

(n) Japanese writing paper used for calligraphy

judge advocate

(n) block copy

block copy artist

(n) all but dead; half killed

(n) Hemiptera

(n,vs) reflection; reverberation;

reflex action

That probably doesn't help but it was fun looking for it :D

Bronson

Paula Lydon 07-20-2003 07:56 AM

~~Cool! Thanks, Bronson. I thought English could be tough with 2 or 3 meanings for the same word :)

Don_Modesto 07-20-2003 01:28 PM

Re: Odd word
 
Quote:

Paula Lydon wrote:
~~Anyone every hear of the word/title of 'hanshi'?

Don't know much about it. It seems to be a rank confered by the Butokukai. Aikidojournal.com defines it as, "Sword master of high rank" although you hear karate people claiming the rank, too. It seems to be a designation given in addition to DAN ranks. Not sure what HANSHI corellates with, but I think with 8-10 DAN (fact check here, I couldn't find confirmation in the quick check I made online.)

Charlie Huff 07-20-2003 03:20 PM

In Kyudo, "hanshi" is the highest teaching rank. (In addition to dan ranks there are three specific ranks for teachers: renshi, kyoshi, and hanshi.) A hanshi is typically at least an eighth dan.

The Wrenster 07-20-2003 03:33 PM

aaaah that sounds familiar. At my dojo, the head honcho is Hanshi, and the next most senior instructo a Renshi... i dont know if they are official though, something ill have to check in on...

Dave Miller 08-05-2003 07:22 AM

When I was involved in Okinawan Karate, we used the word as basically a synonymn for "master" or "great teacher."

Kensho Furuya 08-29-2003 11:18 PM

The term, "Hanshi" as it is used in Japanese martial arts is a title indicating the level of a teacher. It is used in many of the older, more traditional martial arts such as kendo, iaido, and kyudo to name a few. There are three titles, the first being "renshi" ("ren" means training). The second is "kyoshi" ("kyo" meaning instruction). And the highest is "hanshi" ("han" meaning model). Some people equate "hanshi" with "shihan," but the term "shihan" is a more generic term or rather a more polite term for "sensei." One who attains the title of hanshi is one of great skill and seniority or who has attained great merit in his art. Renshi, Kyoshi and Hanshi are titles which are bestowed upon the teacher. They are bestowed separately from one's dan grade and is a special honor and title to those teachers. I hope this helps you. . . . . . thanks.

Kent Enfield 08-30-2003 04:27 PM

Quote:

Kensho Furuya wrote:
Renshi, Kyoshi and Hanshi are titles which are bestowed upon the teacher. They are bestowed separately from one's dan grade and is a special honor and title to those teachers.

While that is how it is the kendo federation, that's not how it always was or is now in the Zen Nihon Naginata Renmei. The ZNNR has the same system the ZNKR had before 1957, in which renshi, kyoshi, and hanshi, follow godan. That is, one is promoted from godan to renshi to kyoshi to hanshi. I don't know how it works in the Kyudo Renmei, Battodo Renmei, Iaido Renmei, or the like.

It's just a minor quibble. Either way, people ranked hanshi are masters of their respective arts.

Ang3LuZ 10-09-2003 05:40 PM

"Hanshi" subject
 
Well I was passing by and noticed this thread and so i will try to give my little cent in here: The Dai Nippon Butoku Kai (established in the Butokuden in Kyoto) is the oldest Budo organization that gathers japanese traditional martial arts - it is held by prince Higashi Fushimi Jigo and they honor people that have achieved a high level of understanding in their art with "Kyoshi", "Renshi" and "Hanshi".

See ya soon

:circle: :square: :triangle:

BKimpel 10-09-2003 08:49 PM

That's kind of funky. Shihan means teacher, but hanshi means model teacher.

With a little flip of the words you go from generic to model.

Neat.

Kensho Furuya 10-09-2003 09:47 PM

It is just like in the English language, "God" spelled backwards is "dog." In the Chinese or Japanese language, that would never do, not at all, ever! Too impolite!

Ps: I just use this as a linguistic example and mean no offense at all to use this sacred Word. My deepest and sincerest apologies!

Frederick VanStrander 10-15-2003 09:58 AM

I am new to aikido, and I just started (this week) training in Nihon Goshin Aikido. The names of the techniques are in english, so I am having a difficult time understanding alot of the posts. If anyone is familiar with NGA could you please help me out?

Respectfully

Frederick

"Common sense does not accomplish great things, simply become insane and desperate"- Lord Naoshige

Clayton Kale 10-15-2003 11:19 AM

Quote:

Kensho Furuya wrote:
It is just like in the English language, "God" spelled backwards is "dog." In the Chinese or Japanese language, that would never do, not at all, ever! Too impolite!

Ps: I just use this as a linguistic example and mean no offense at all to use this sacred Word. My deepest and sincerest apologies!

No offense taken. After all, don't dogs have Buddah nature? ;)

Kensho Furuya 10-15-2003 12:10 PM

Yes, dogs have Buddha Nature, even a banana leaf! Many thanks!

Chris Li 10-15-2003 11:42 PM

Quote:

Bruce Kimpel (BKimpel) wrote:
That's kind of funky. Shihan means teacher, but hanshi means model teacher.

With a little flip of the words you go from generic to model.

Neat.

Actually, the kanji for the two terms are different. In addition, "shihan" is generally defined in Japanese (in both the Daijirin and the Kojien) as a "model" teacher, whereas "hanshi" is generally defined as a title issued in certain arts (although the "han", which both terms share, is literally translated as "model").

Best,

Chris

Kensho Furuya 10-16-2003 07:00 AM

This is exactly right, I am happy to see that someone is using reliable references to clear up such questions. Shihan is a general title referring to instructors of some seniority or respect. Hanshi is a specific title which must be conferred by one's head organization, (if such titles are used).

The idea of being the "model" teacher is the highest form of instruction in traditional martial arts and all other traditional fine arts in Japanese culture. This concept comes from Confucianism in which the teacher or gentlemen-scholar serves as a "model" for all others to follow, imitate and esteem.

akiy 10-16-2003 09:44 AM

Quote:

Kensho Furuya wrote:
The idea of being the "model" teacher is the highest form of instruction in traditional martial arts and all other traditional fine arts in Japanese culture. This concept comes from Confucianism in which the teacher or gentlemen-scholar serves as a "model" for all others to follow, imitate and esteem.

There is a fairly in-depth article written by Peter Goldsbury on this subject on this very website:

http://www.aikiweb.com/language/goldsbury1.html

Also, Jim Vance has written a follow-up on the subject from his perspective as well:

http://www.aikiweb.com/language/vance1.html

-- Jun


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