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-   -   Tap into the Mind's Power (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2464)

chadsieger 08-27-2002 11:19 AM

Tap into the Mind's Power
 
Consider the quote, "Humans use only 10% of their brain." This often leads to the question, where on earth is the other 90% and how do we use it?

I personally do not have that answer, however, I do see how some of it can be used an manipulated with regard to budo.

Catching a ball. To many of you, catching a ball now seems like child's play, however, this was not always the case. While you were first learning your brain had to first get use to objects in flight. This may not have happened the first time you saw a ball in the air, but soon, your brain got used to a object's ascent and eventual descent on the earth's surface. The next, more difficult, step is to coordinate the body and hand to be in a position to be there when the ball lands. Anyone that has ever been hit with a ball knows that this is not always an easy task.

Experienced ball catchers know that the way to catch a ball is not to stop, calculate the trajectory of the ball, decide which muscle groups to fire to activate the body, then activate those muscles to put the body in the correct postion to be there when the ball lands. This would be far too time consuming to be effective. Instead, simply look at the ball and allow the brain to do the work for you. Your brain, a supercomputer, has no difficulty doing these calculations whatsoever.

Like I said however, your brain cannot automatically do this from birth. It first has to learn the rules that an object in flight, as well as the rules that govern our body's movement.

Theoretically, if the brain had complete knowledge of the "rules" of budo (ie. principles, techniques, body mechanics), one could simply "turn off" their active mind and allow the power of the brain to do its work. That is why it is impossible for Aikidoka to replicate their moves exactly, often they don't even know what they did! Interestingly enough, Ueshiba himself said, "Learn and forget." This means to "learn" the rules, but don't try to remember them when the situation arises. You must do the prep work, but when attacked, allow your brain to do the work.

This is also no easy task, it takes mental disipline. But, one can see that some of the power of the mind can be utilized in Aikido. If you spend time training your body, why not spend at least some time training your mind?

Is this the complete answer to what ki is? No. But the mind can do such amazing things, it would seem no wonder that a word like ki might be used to explain the unexplainable.

Peace,
Chad Sieger

mike lee 08-27-2002 11:29 AM

procreation
 
Quote:

Consider the quote, "Humans use only 10% of their brain." This often leads to the question, where on earth is the other 90% and how do we use it?
I know the answer! It's between their legs!!!

(Sorry, sorry, sorry -- just couldn't resist.)

SeiserL 08-28-2002 09:08 AM

IMHO, mental stimulation, mental exercise, mental discipline, and meditation can help tap into more of the mind's potential. Instead of identifying with it, the mind becomes only a tool to be sharpened.

Until again,

Lynn

Kevin Leavitt 08-28-2002 02:11 PM

To capitalize on Lynn's post. Half our problems as humans is that we allow ourselves to be defined by our own limited experiences and sense of self.

Medidation from my experiences allows us to see that we are part of a bigger picture and experience....which broadens our perspective allowing us to us more of our brain so to speak.

Alfonso 08-28-2002 05:34 PM

Quote:

Consider the quote, "Humans use only 10% of their brain." This often leads to the question, where on earth is the other 90% and how do we use it?
Sorry, couldn't resist:

http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/tenper.html

Pretoriano 08-28-2002 05:42 PM

So we are discussing about being smarter produces a better Aikidoka, I agree.

PD: to Alfonso Thanks for the Link!

Pretoriano

Bruce Baker 08-28-2002 06:17 PM

This is the process of thinking without thinking.

Consider how much memory you use in your computer for any given funtion? 10 percent? Maybe as much as 20 percent? What happens when you get a program that takes up all the memory? Either Freeze, or Crash ... right?

It is said that every moment of your life is stored in your brain, but not all of it is accessable, or properly stored. What about the body functions that keep your body alive, how memory do you need for that?

This 10 percent thing is just a sales come on to maximum memory in use any one time.

As far a the usefullness in training, try to remember the best of what works, let the brain adjust with as little prodding, hints, and pain as possible.

I sure don't want the fear factor of pain from a broken nose, or other inductions from pain from missed catches affecting my ablility to catch a ball, divert a punch, or keep pain to minimum.

Let your practice be remembered as the best of what you do, so your natural talent to improve become cognizant with pleasure, not pain.

I sure there is room for storing some good training in the old noggin before it gets filled up, and you have to erase something to make room for more.

Now that is a feature I would like to improve, the erase feature. Any ideas?

SeiserL 08-28-2002 08:27 PM

Quote:

Bruce Baker wrote:
Now that is a feature I would like to improve, the erase feature. Any ideas?

Actually, if you store your information visually, you can unlearn by reprocessng the information by stepping out of the picture (spectator position), make the color movie and small black and white print, push it out some distance from you, slide it down your time line into the past. Replace it with a full color movie right in front of you and step into it (participator position)of a more effective and efficient response.

Until again,

Lynn

opherdonchin 08-29-2002 02:57 AM

Lynn,

That's a nice idea. Where did it come from?

Bruce Baker 08-29-2002 08:38 AM

Actually, usless information is still there, but in a foggy way it is always just out of reach. Kind of like ... I see the blurred image, I kind of know what it is, but no details are readable or accessable.

Half an erasure?

Oh well ... focus on what is important for the recent to near past. Eventually important stuff is ingrained, and unimportant fades away.

SeiserL 08-29-2002 09:02 AM

Quote:

Bruce Baker wrote:
focus on what is important for the recent to near past. Eventually important stuff is ingrained, and unimportant fades away.

Agreed. One way to help train the mind and tap into its power is to "focus" and "fade" consciously on purpose.

BTW, the patterns come from Neurolinguistic Programming. I also do sport psychology.

Until again,

Lynn

mike lee 08-29-2002 11:06 AM

does it even have a brain?
 
Facinating. In one instant Alfonso completely debunked the "using only 10% of the brain" myth with a slew of facts, but this thread just keeps going on and on like nothing ever happened. What accounts for that? (Maybe Einstein really was right.) :rolleyes:

Erik 08-29-2002 11:26 AM

Quote:

Mike Lee (mike lee) wrote:
Facinating. In one instant Alfonso completely debunked the "using only 10% of the brain" myth with a slew of facts, but this thread just keeps going on and on like nothing ever happened. What accounts for that? (Maybe Einstein really was right.) :rolleyes:

Since when have facts ever gotten in the way of belief?

chadsieger 08-29-2002 12:05 PM

I believe that the "10% of our brains" expression is simply just that, an expression. I only used it to demonstrate that the brain can do incredible things, ie. instaneously calculate the trajectory of a ball in flight.

Try to do it on paper. Chances are, the ball will hit you before your pen hits the pad.

You can utilize this brain power not only to catch balls, but eventually it can be used in budo. Then you will see some progress to your art!

Sieger

Alfonso 08-29-2002 12:47 PM

Hey , I agree with most of what's been discussed by Lynn, Bruce, Chad and others that support mind development. I think the subject is fascinating and doens't need the adornment of urban myths.

I was made aware of this particular one while researching memetics and there's a whole 'nother game going on there.

In any case to me at least, the dojo is a place where I've had the chance to experience and observe the process of forming neural connections. One of the things I enjoy about Aikido lessons outside the martial aspect is this, the mind-body link.

SeiserL 08-30-2002 09:10 AM

[quote="Alfonso Adriasola (AlfonsoI was made aware of this particular one while researching memetics and there's a whole 'nother game going on there.[/QUOTE]Ah yes, the contagious "thought virus". There are more then a few of them floating around the Dojo. My compliments for being that aware.

Until again,

Lynn

Alfonso 08-30-2002 01:53 PM

Quote:

There are more then a few of them floating around the Dojo
and even more floating on the forums. Which has probably more to do with why I even open my cybernetic mouth at all.

and this is also why I wish there were more intervention by senior aikidoka.

Lynn, for me at least you nailed it in the self-doubt thread, about allowing others' ideas to take center.


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