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SteliosPapadakis 09-11-2012 11:11 AM

Supporting the less able...
 
I had this idea long time ago. To help the less privileged kids of our town by teaching them (if they wanted and if their superiors allowed it) anything i have learned in life. I offered to teach Aikido to the local orphanage.
At first the director there seemed quite enthusiastic with the idea. What more beautiful that to teach children, who are deprived of many things and chances, the art of peace? They could learn a thing or two that they could use wisely in life.
Then, by talking to my teacher and asking for permit to teach there (without charging anything, even providing the puzzle-like mats we used in another dojo) a quite serious matter arose: what happens in case of an accident?
The status there is that the children are covered by social security for whatever happens in the promises and what is included in their books. And of course, martial arts are not included (the rationale being that many of them come from torn-apart families with history of violence. So by learning martial arts they are though of being more prone to doing wrong more efficiently). So the director of the foundation told me i would be totally responsible for anything happening to them kids.
A lot of things can go (and often do) go wrong to a beginner. Bruises from incorrect body positioning in ukemi, problems in ankle/elbow/shoulder joints and the sort. We even had a guy that almost broke his neck once.
Our Aikikai affiliation will not cover my teaching there and as i see it, the director of the foundation will not change his mind on the matter.
Another quest turned to dust?
:confused:

Eva Antonia 09-12-2012 01:59 AM

Re: Supporting the less able...
 
Dear Stelios,

couldn't you offer them courses in your dojo if that's logistically possible? Then they should be covered like any other student.Your foundation couldn't possibly reject that, could it?

Our dojo is in vicinity to a state boarding school for children from problematic households (children who have been taken away from violent parents, parents parking their kids there while they do a detoxication cure, children just abandoned by parents who don't care...) and in the last years we always had some students coming from there. They were insured like anyone else, and they weren't more or less violent than the rest of us. None of them stayed until reaching a high grade, but then none of the other kids does, neither (there is some room for improvement in kids' permanence).

I wih you much luck wiht your endeavour!

Eva

SteveTrinkle 09-12-2012 08:11 AM

Re: Supporting the less able...
 
liasuzuki sensei is doing this in santa barbaara californiahttp://aksb.org

Larry Feldman 09-13-2012 01:00 PM

Re: Supporting the less able...
 
I like the other ideas posed.

I am no expert in local law, but perhaps you could form a corporation - or charity that provides teaching services. The services would be provided by the charity and possibly insulate you from legal liability. But check with an attorney in your country to see if this is possible.

It is a noble cause - keep trying to figure out a solution.

SteveTrinkle 09-13-2012 05:03 PM

Re: Supporting the less able...
 
aikido kenkyukai santa barbarahttp://aksb.orghttp://aksb.org

Tom Verhoeven 09-13-2012 07:17 PM

Re: Supporting the less able...
 
Quote:

Eva Röben wrote: (Post 315790)
Dear Stelios,

couldn't you offer them courses in your dojo if that's logistically possible? Then they should be covered like any other student.Your foundation couldn't possibly reject that, could it?

Our dojo is in vicinity to a state boarding school for children from problematic households (children who have been taken away from violent parents, parents parking their kids there while they do a detoxication cure, children just abandoned by parents who don't care...) and in the last years we always had some students coming from there. They were insured like anyone else, and they weren't more or less violent than the rest of us. None of them stayed until reaching a high grade, but then none of the other kids does, neither (there is some room for improvement in kids' permanence).

I wih you much luck wiht your endeavour!

Eva

Teaching Aikido to less priviliged children is an excellent idea. I think Eva Roben's idea is a very good alternative.
I know nothing about the law in Greece, but in the Netherlands it is best that the participants become members of the dojo. Only then are they insured - not if they are doing a course. As for the instructor - he has to be certified by a National Aikido organisation. And then you also have to check if you are personally legally liable in case something happens. In the Netherlands this is not the case with sportive activities, you do that on your own risk. Although in one case an exception was made; in a club a group of gymnasts were practising with experienced assistants, but without a certified instructor. An accident did happen and the club was made responsible.
But the law on this is not the same in each European country, so you should try to find some local legal advice.

Good luck with this initiative!

Tom

SteliosPapadakis 09-14-2012 12:09 AM

Re: Supporting the less able...
 
Thank you all for your words and support.
Will see what alternatives exist and act accordingly.
:)

jackleach 10-15-2012 05:07 PM

Re: Supporting the less able...
 
Lia Suzuki Sensei is successfully running her nonprofit dojo here in Santa Barbara and in L.A., off of that idea. She provides discounts for at-risk-youth, military veterans and families with low economical stature. It's a noble and righteous cause, keep going with your idea!


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