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-   -   Re: It Had to Be Felt #7: Yamaguchi Seigo: Suburi with People (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=21032)

kewms 03-20-2012 03:52 PM

Re: It Had to Be Felt #7: Yamaguchi Seigo: Suburi with People
 
I never had the opportunity to train with Yamaguchi Sensei. I did study for quite a few years with Gleason Sensei, one of his most prominent American students. Gleason Sensei once said that Yamaguchi Sensei's response to pretty much any training injury was "you were too tight."

Which illuminates one of the big challenges of ukemi, IMO: if you're completely accommodating, you won't get hurt, but maybe your ukemi isn't very martial. How do you preserve the structure you need for reversals, followup attacks, etc. while maintaining the relaxation and responsiveness that keep you safe?

I'm not sure, but I think having the appropriate balance at all times may be equivalent to mastering aikido.

Katherine

Alister Gillies 03-23-2012 06:23 AM

Re: It Had to Be Felt #7: Yamaguchi Seigo: Suburi with People
 
I have never trained with Yamaguchi Sensei, but I have trained with his son Yamaguchi Tetsuo Sensei, Yamashima Sensei, Endo Sensei, Tissier Sensei and Mimuro Sensei. All have different qualities and emphasise different aspects of Yamaguchi Sensei's style of Aikido. Common to all, is a strong centre to centre connection and emphasis on sensitivity and alive and powerful relaxation.

Uke and nage are two sides of the same coin and both are engaged in the same endeavour, moving with sensitivity and connection. This makes practice valuable for both. True, the denouement is the result of a set up and the resulting throw may appear contrived. On the other hand, resistance within the 'set up' is a form of disengagement and makes the outcome less predictable, perhaps even dangerous. It is not good training or practice.

There is a whole debate about goshin waza and Ki-no-nagare that has been going on - it seems - forever. The clip that Alex refers to illustrates the case and the confusion that for many is seldom resolved.

Aikido is a martial art, but it is not about fighting. In the thirty or so years that I have been associated with Aikido, I have seen endless examples on the mat of people trying to practice a mix of goshin waza and ki-no-nagare Aikido at the same time - and people wonder why they are not progressing! In the Ki Aikido, which is a large part of my background, this was jokingly referred to this as resisting with Ki - yes resistance is common to all styles.

In most of the films that I have seen of Saito Sensei, he starts a class with tai-no-henko and talks about distinguishing between goshin waza and ki-no-nagare. He does this to clarify that they are different forms of practice.

Hiroshi Ikeda Sensei often points out at his seminars that 'hard' and 'soft' are two ways of expressing unity, but it is the unity that is important not the outward form of expression. Where people are running around the mat trying to aikido each other, they are only struggling with themselves and each other. Of course I have done this, too; I know whereof I speak:)

akiy 03-23-2012 09:50 AM

Re: It Had to Be Felt #7: Yamaguchi Seigo: Suburi with People
 
Hi Alister,

I have moved your above post from the It Had to Be Felt #7: Yamaguchi Seigo: Suburi with People column thread as your post is not congruent with Ellis's wish that "Only people who have actually taken ukemi the teacher who is the subject of this thread, may post" in that particular thread.

Further information on the "It Had to be Felt" series may be found in his introductory column.

Thanks,

-- Jun

Chicko Xerri 04-20-2012 09:11 PM

Re: It Had to Be Felt #7: Yamaguchi Seigo: Suburi with People
 
(Being My Own.) So there you go. What a great Compliment to have put in your direction. O,sensei's Aikido certainly Transformed Yamaguchi sensei to become a free thinking, free acting individual Japanese man. This is the beauty of Modern Aikido developed out of the mind of an Ancient but deeply insightful mind of a Japanese Master of Budo. O,Sensei Aikido is evident in being able to change the Mind of a Nations future. This was his Dream for Japan, the World and Humankind... THANK YOU FOR THE ABOVE ARTICLE.
Chicko.

akiy 04-20-2012 11:48 PM

Re: It Had to Be Felt #7: Yamaguchi Seigo: Suburi with People
 
Hi Chicko,

I have moved your above post from the It Had to Be Felt #7: Yamaguchi Seigo: Suburi with People column thread as your post is not congruent with Ellis's wish:
  • If, for any reason, you find something to praise or condemn in anyone's description or wish to amplify your insights and perceptions, do so elsewhere. Start a thread about that subject in the appropriate section of Aikiweb. rather than posting direct replies to others.
Further information on the "It Had to be Felt" series may be found in his introductory column.

Thanks,

-- Jun

Chicko Xerri 04-21-2012 11:11 PM

Re: It Had to Be Felt #7: Yamaguchi Seigo: Suburi with People
 
OOPS Sorry Jun, I apologise [quote=Jun Akiyama;307780]Hi Chicko,

I have moved your above post from the It Had to Be Felt #7: Yamaguchi Seigo: Suburi with People column thread as your post is not congruent with Ellis's wish:
  • If, for any reason, you find something to praise or condemn in anyone's description or wish to amplify your insights and perceptions, do so elsewhere. Start a thread about that subject in the appropriate section of Aikiweb. rather than posting direct replies to others.
Further information on the "It Had to be Felt" series may be found in his introductory column.

Thanks,

-- Jun[/QUOTE

OOPS. Sorry Jun, I apologise


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