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-   -   Training with full hip replacement (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20931)

Alec Corper 03-01-2012 04:44 AM

Training with full hip replacement
 
Hello to all,
This is a general question to hear what, if any, experience is out there concerning continued training after hip replacement. My left hip is pretty much gone, maybe another year or two at max before I need surgery. I'm 60 this year and I've trained for 35 years, the last 20 in Aikido ( and other stuff). My training in aikido now is mostly teaching since I can't take much ukemi or move at really full speed. In Tai Chi and PMA I have less problem than with aikido, tenkan particularly is stressful. I don't want to stop training so I am delaying surgery as long as possible. Anybody out there can tell me the "good news" part of hip prosthetics ?
many thanks, Alec

LinTal 03-01-2012 04:50 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
It's not full, but one of our guys had the joints resurfaced. 2 months off the mat, he avoids breakfalls and goes slowly but he's back. :)

All the best!
S.

Peter Goldsbury 03-01-2012 05:08 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
Quote:

Alec Corper wrote: (Post 304391)
Hello to all,
This is a general question to hear what, if any, experience is out there concerning continued training after hip replacement. My left hip is pretty much gone, maybe another year or two at max before I need surgery. I'm 60 this year and I've trained for 35 years, the last 20 in Aikido ( and other stuff). My training in aikido now is mostly teaching since I can't take much ukemi or move at really full speed. In Tai Chi and PMA I have less problem than with aikido, tenkan particularly is stressful. I don't want to stop training so I am delaying surgery as long as possible. Anybody out there can tell me the "good news" part of hip prosthetics ?
many thanks, Alec

Hello Alec,

Is the hip that bad? My colleague in the dojo has just had a hip replacement and she is gradually coming back to training. She is German and had the operation done in Germany. I think she was out of action for a coupe of months, but when she came back to Hiroshima she could walk without crutches. Of course, there was no aikido training at first and I don't think she takes ukemi, yet.

If you PM me, I can give you more information and you can contact her directly.

Best wishes,

PAG

Shadowfax 03-01-2012 08:24 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
May Heiny Sensei had one several years ago. She also just recently had a knee replacement. And she is still teaching seminars all over the place and as far as I can tell she is managing quite well. From what little I have heard her say the hip replacement really made things a lot better for her than they were before she had it. The big key is to get serious about doing the PT afterwards.

Alec Corper 03-01-2012 09:09 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
Thanks all for the responses so far. Nice to hear that Mary says it is better now than before.
Peter, thank you I have PM'ed you.

woudew 03-01-2012 09:46 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
If you decide to go ahead with the operation, i hope it will be better also for you.

philipsmith 03-01-2012 10:25 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
Provided you take your rehab slowly and seriously it shouldn't be a problem.
As a physiotherapist I've seen quite a few people return to all kinds of sport following hip replacements.

Generally speaking don't look to take ukeme for about a year post-op, although you can go back to gentle practice after 3-4 months.

Hope that helps.

P.S. I was training with a good friend of mine on Sunday who had aTHR about 3 years ago. He is fully OK now

Howard Popkin 03-01-2012 10:57 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
I have a total knee replacement. Best thing I have done for myself in a long time. Pm me for details. Howard

SeiserL 03-01-2012 01:50 PM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
I have trained with several people will ful hip replacements.

They do fine.

Rehab mindfully youngster.

Shadowfax 03-01-2012 09:10 PM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
I was listening to my sensei this evening coincidentally telling a visitor the story of Heiny sensei's hip and mentioned this thread to him. He reminded me that Kayla Feder sensei also has a total hip replacement and as I saw in her seminar at Oberlin last month she is still taking breakfalls. He mentioned several other names of people who have had them and still practice but I don't recall who they were.

Chuck Clark 03-01-2012 11:25 PM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
I'm due for total hip surgery and they've told me that I should be able to do just about everything I used to do except impact sute ukemi. They said it might be okay but there's a chance of breaking the joint if the angle is wrong one time. That's fine with me... I've done enough of those in my life.

Alec Corper 03-02-2012 01:59 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
Once again thanks to all, including the many PMs I received with concrete info and suggestions. I'm not looking to do any more break falls either Chuck, but I'm curious as to their recovery schedule for you. I appreciate that Lynn calls me "youngster" and cautions for a slow rehab, what have your docs told you to expect and do they take into account your training history and what you want to be able to do in the future?
regards, Alec

Chuck Clark 03-02-2012 10:05 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
My docs at the VA (they come over from the University of Washington Med School to volunteer) have told me that with my history of 55+ years of this activity I should be able to do just about anything I've been capable of doing for the past twenty years except high impact falls of any kind. The afternoon of the surgery they'll have me up walking with a walker and will keep me in the hospital for about five days to check for infection, etc. When I get home they recommend walking, climbing stairs, doing whatever I feel comfortable doing. Pain will be there for about two or three weeks or so average and I should be pushing the envelope appropriately. They said that within two months I should be able to do normal activity as I've described what I want to do. They said other patients are walking, hiking, jogging, tennis, skiing, etc. within reason from that two month period into the future. They have told me that they'll give me the prosthesis with the highest levels of range of motion, etc. Alignment, proper movement, etc. is important. They said the range of flexibility outside the normal daily walking, running, etc. is more limited. For example no extreme postures in yoga, sitting in full lotus for example is a no no... I'm actually feeling pretty good about the possibilities. After 65 years of using this hip, I've realized that from about age 8 until early 40's I did some pretty crazy stuff that did damage to hips, knees, etc. Lots of stuff growing up doing judo was very macho oriented... this realization didn't hit me until I was in my early 50's... seems I'm a bit smart because I know some older folks that are still trying to do that stuff. I was very proud of being one of the guys that finished doing 4,000 squat thrusts one afternoon in USMC boot camp at MCRD San Diego (yeah, I am a "Hollywood Marine") Now they won't let anyone do one squat thrust the way we used to... it's bad for the knees and hips. I've had two knee surgeries and have arthritis in both knees, hips, hands (lots of punching a makiwara and breaking hard stuff during junior and senior high school), lots and lots of duckwalking with someone on my back around the dojo and up and down 108 steps to a Shinto jinja, etc. in Japan and other crazy shit that has really nothing to do with learning good budo.

I'm still pretty active and when the hip is replaced I'm told that I'll very surprised at how good I feel (along with some other meds I'll be taking for the rest of my life...) plus being able to continue pretty juicy budo practice. I have just one more thing to say, "thank you very much for your tax dollars that help take care of vets that laid their lives on the line... I and many others really appreciate it.

Get good docs to take care of you and I hope things go well for you Alec (and others in a similar boat).

Regards,

- Chuck

Alec Corper 03-02-2012 11:22 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
thanks for your patience in replying Chuck, I can relate to your training history. i have also done a lot of stupid stuff that made sense at the time, but they don't tell you that the bill comes due later. even some of the stuff that seems sensible like shikko (good for training the centre, according to the japanese) is maybe not so good for us Westerners. I also have some arthritic damage in my hands from breaking techniques and "Iron palm" training. Makes me wonder now who I was planning to fight, robocop maybe?
Anyway I wish you well with your surgery, please let me know how it goes with your recovery, I'll be thinking of you.
I have been told I can hold off for a year or two, dependent upon the integrity of the rest of the skeletal and muscular structure which is being monitored by points scoring method so i'm now trying to find the best place to have it done.
regards and respect, Alec

edshockley 03-07-2012 08:49 PM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
Henry Smith Shihan had successful hip replacement surgery two years ago followed by double knee replacement recently. (All football injuries). He does not do break falls but is back teaching. He currently cannot sit seiza but moves far better than before the operations.

NagaBaba 03-08-2012 02:39 PM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
Hi Alec,
I know very well one instructor with full hip replacement. He is back to practice with few limitations mentioned above, and very happy. His comment is go as fast as possible, younger you are, better recovery time will be. Also when come to choose the material for replacement, explain to the doctor what you gonna be doing after, it helps to choose a stronger one (sorry forgot a right name of this material). Concerning time recovery the most important in his case was doing regularly with great commitment all those physio exercises.
take care

Chris Wallace 10-13-2012 11:36 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
Hi Alec
Just spotted your question
I am 58 and had a total hip replacement in Dec 11. So getting on for 12 months ago
I am 3rd Dan Aikido and co run a club in Marple, Cheshire UK
I had been troubled with a painful hip for quite a few years and although I could cope with everyday life, it was certainly affecting my Aikido
It was a very difficult decision, as I could still do reasonable Ukemi and I wasnt sure how the hip replacement would restrict my Aikido. Would I still be able to continue?
I sought guidance from Phil Smith UKA (and a consultant Physio) and gave it considerable thought.

Anyway, I had it done and was back on the mat teaching and doing very careful Aikido after 3 months. Now 10 months on I am back to 90%. I am still a little sore when taking ukemi and havent yet tried high level ukemi from say Shihonage or Kotogieshi, although I probably could
Tenkan was a little scary for a while but ok now

My advice to any Aikidoka, based on my experience is to go for the replacement but make sure you really work hard on the physio straight after the op and to continue with the exersises for at least 3-months

I would be interested to know what you decided, if you went ahead with the op and if so, how are you doing

Regards
Chris Wallace

Janet Rosen 10-13-2012 12:41 PM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
Best of luck to all for infection free surgeries and successful rehab!

rachmass 10-14-2012 02:28 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
Hello, did you opt for the surgery, and if so how are you feeling? Back on the mat?

oisin bourke 10-16-2012 01:29 PM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
This thread could provide a useful guide to types of training best to avoid in terms of chronic joint injury. There's a lot of good advice already here. If I could ask another few questions:

What type of training do you feel specifically leads to joint injury?

How would you modify said training?

At what stage did you start to notice chronic joint damage and how did it manifest itself?

Alec Corper 11-07-2012 02:05 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
Hello All,
A brief reply due to the kind interest of all, I have quit using Aikiweb, but received notification of posts so a courtesy visit. My injury is not the result of training. Apparently there is a birth defct which causes both hips to sit shallow in the socket. As a result the left thich bone ahs twisted to the left resulting in constant wear and tear to the point of virtual cartilage disappearance. In all likelihood 35 years of MA has kept me out of surgery rather than leading to it. I will have the op on Dec 3rd and I plan for a 9-12 month full recovery. My advice FWIW, stay light (difficult with ageing), stay flexible (keep training) emphasis lower body movement over upper body strength, and connect your body with good IS/IP skills.
travel straight, Alec

oisin bourke 11-07-2012 02:34 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
That's great information,and reassuring to know.

Best of luck with the operation.

woudew 11-07-2012 02:49 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
Quote:

Alec Corper wrote: (Post 318580)
Hello All,
A brief reply due to the kind interest of all, I have quit using Aikiweb, but received notification of posts so a courtesy visit. My injury is not the result of training. Apparently there is a birth defct which causes both hips to sit shallow in the socket. As a result the left thich bone ahs twisted to the left resulting in constant wear and tear to the point of virtual cartilage disappearance. In all likelihood 35 years of MA has kept me out of surgery rather than leading to it. I will have the op on Dec 3rd and I plan for a 9-12 month full recovery. My advice FWIW, stay light (difficult with ageing), stay flexible (keep training) emphasis lower body movement over upper body strength, and connect your body with good IS/IP skills.
travel straight, Alec

Good luck with the operation Alec.

i hope to see you soon back

Neal Earhart 11-07-2012 10:04 AM

Re: Training with full hip replacement
 
We have a student at the dojo in his mid-60's, who has had both knees and a hip replaced. He does very well in class. Practices in both our morning and evening classes each weekday. No seiza/suwari waza or breakfalls. He will be testing for Shodan this December and should have a very good test.


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