AikiWeb Aikido Forums

AikiWeb Aikido Forums (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/index.php)
-   Techniques (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=4)
-   -   Does this practice have a name? (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20785)

Krystal Locke 01-31-2012 01:23 PM

Does this practice have a name?
 
Sometimes, we chain techniques together through maintaining contact and control during uke's ukemi. We connect shiho nage into a back roll (nage keeping contact with uke's controlled arm through the roll) then, as uke stands up out of the roll, flow into kotegaeshi into a back roll in which nage stays on uke's affected wrist with the nage's "secondary" hand, and nage uses that controlled arm to move into irimi nage.

Does this practice have a name I am forgetting, and better yet, anyone have a video of this and other technique chains?

SeiserL 01-31-2012 01:35 PM

Re: Does this practice have a name?
 
Kanren: linking (?)

Mark Freeman 01-31-2012 01:39 PM

Re: Does this practice have a name?
 
Quote:

Krystal Locke wrote: (Post 302196)
Sometimes, we chain techniques together through maintaining contact and control during uke's ukemi. We connect shiho nage into a back roll (nage keeping contact with uke's controlled arm through the roll) then, as uke stands up out of the roll, flow into kotegaeshi into a back roll in which nage stays on uke's affected wrist with the nage's "secondary" hand, and nage uses that controlled arm to move into irimi nage.

Does this practice have a name I am forgetting, and better yet, anyone have a video of this and other technique chains?

Hi Kystal,

no idea what this series is called, but we occasionally do the same with the last technique being ikkyo, good practice, whatever the name.

regards

Mark

sakumeikan 02-01-2012 01:08 AM

Re: Does this practice have a name?
 
Quote:

Krystal Locke wrote: (Post 302196)
Sometimes, we chain techniques together through maintaining contact and control during uke's ukemi. We connect shiho nage into a back roll (nage keeping contact with uke's controlled arm through the roll) then, as uke stands up out of the roll, flow into kotegaeshi into a back roll in which nage stays on uke's affected wrist with the nage's "secondary" hand, and nage uses that controlled arm to move into irimi nage.

Does this practice have a name I am forgetting, and better yet, anyone have a video of this and other technique chains?

Hi , Krystal,
Renrakuwaza. cheers, Joe.

tlk52 02-01-2012 04:10 PM

Re: Does this practice have a name?
 
I think that you'd call it a variation of Henka waza, or changing from one technique to another

gtaba 02-02-2012 01:29 AM

Re: Does this practice have a name?
 
Without breaking the initial contact? I've heard it called Renzoku, linking the ikkyo, to the kotegaishi, etc...

hughrbeyer 02-02-2012 09:23 PM

Re: Does this practice have a name?
 
It's a fun practice, but I'm suspicious of it. I got into it with a black belt from another dojo at a gasshuku last year, kotegaishi to nikkyo to irimi to kaiten-nage. Fun, but the truth is if he hadn't been getting his center back at the end of each technique, he'd never have been able to attack well enough to motivate the next technique. Since then, I've been working more on the "one cut/one kill" end of the spectrum.

Tom Verhoeven 03-20-2012 07:54 PM

Re: Does this practice have a name?
 
Quote:

Joe Curran wrote: (Post 302226)
Hi , Krystal,
Renrakuwaza. cheers, Joe.

Or renzoku waza. The meaning is almost the same, I would say. Renraku waza translates as a continuation of techniques. While renzoku waza means a group or serie of techniques.

Both are used in Aikido for a sequence of techniques. Although I remember a conversation with a Judo teacher who pointed out to me that there is supposed to be a subtle difference between renzoku waza and renraku waza.
Renraku waza would then be more a combination of two or more techniques, while renzoku waza would be a series, a sequence of techniques.
But I have never heard any of my Aikido sensei make that distinction.

kind regards,

Tom

Tom Verhoeven 03-20-2012 08:25 PM

Re: Does this practice have a name?
 
Quote:

Toby Kasavan wrote: (Post 302267)
I think that you'd call it a variation of Henka waza, or changing from one technique to another

Henka means change or alternation. What you change is the form of the technique because your partner is resisting, or trying to counter or because there is another attacker (etc). In other words, the situation changes and so you change the technique.

If the change of situation leads you to another technique then I suppose you could say that it is henka waza, but more precise would be renraku waza (or renzoku waza).

Best,

Tom

sakumeikan 03-21-2012 08:52 AM

Re: Does this practice have a name?
 
Quote:

Tom Verhoeven wrote: (Post 306112)
Or renzoku waza. The meaning is almost the same, I would say. Renraku waza translates as a continuation of techniques. While renzoku waza means a group or serie of techniques.

Both are used in Aikido for a sequence of techniques. Although I remember a conversation with a Judo teacher who pointed out to me that there is supposed to be a subtle difference between renzoku waza and renraku waza.
Renraku waza would then be more a combination of two or more techniques, while renzoku waza would be a series, a sequence of techniques.
But I have never heard any of my Aikido sensei make that distinction.

kind regards,

Tom

Hi Tom,
My initial contact with the phrase renrakuwaza was in my judo days circa 1960.It was used primarily as an indication of linking attacks /combining waza.I may well be wrong here but Saito Sensei in Jo work used the term rensokuwaza in relation to his jo movements.I think perhaps the terms are /have similar meaning.Cheers, Joe.

Tom Verhoeven 03-21-2012 12:17 PM

Re: Does this practice have a name?
 
Quote:

Joe Curran wrote: (Post 306145)
Hi Tom,
My initial contact with the phrase renrakuwaza was in my judo days circa 1960.It was used primarily as an indication of linking attacks /combining waza.I may well be wrong here but Saito Sensei in Jo work used the term rensokuwaza in relation to his jo movements.I think perhaps the terms are /have similar meaning.Cheers, Joe.

Hi Joe,
You are right, that is what I meant. I do not have that much experience with Judo. At that time I was teaching Aikido at this Judoschool and after class I often had discussions with the judo-teacher about the similarities and differences between Judo and Aikido, and I remember that this point came up. He had some wonderful drawings on the wall that showed the difference between renraku - and renzoku waza. You are also right about rensoku waza in relation to Aiki Jo; linking one technique after the other. There, I feel, is the difference between renraku waza and renzoku waza even more a blur.

Perhaps we do not use the distinction between renraku waza and renzoku waza so much in Aikido, as it does not in a didactic sense really clarifies things, but rather complicates matters?

Greetings from the Auvergne,
Tom


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:11 AM.

Powered by: vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.