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JRY 05-10-2011 09:17 AM

1st Kumijo
 
Hi guys

I was wondering if anyone could help me shed some light into this.
I've been watching Saito sensei's first Kumijo and was wondering about the movement where Saito sensei strikes to the head of uke.

Video here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7IQf6kqxMk

Time: just after 2:00

attack is Haiyai gaeshi? (apologise for wrong spelling)
I'm assuming its a strike to the temple? like a yokomen?

chris wright 05-10-2011 10:13 AM

Re: 1st Kumijo
 
Hi Jerry, as far as i know the strike is a - Gyaku yokomen uchi, similar to Jo Suburi 10.
Stepping with the left, striking over to the right side.

Michael Varin 05-11-2011 05:29 AM

Re: 1st Kumijo
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7IQf6kqxMk

No. I believe Jerry was asking about the first head strike, "just after 2:00."

I always strike to the temple using the last 6 inches or so of the jo. But really temple, behind the ear, jaw line should all have a powerful effect and are close enough to not change the form much.

When I learned this we did both awase (uchi and uke move together) and start-stop, where each partner remains in place until the other has completed his movement, which allows you to be more precise about your targeting.

Was this your only question about the 1st kumi jo? That was very specific!

JRY 05-11-2011 07:49 AM

Re: 1st Kumijo
 
Thanks very much for your input guys :D

yes, the strike that I'm referring to is the first head strike.
I wonder what's the difference with that strike and yokomenuchi?
and Saito sensei called it haiyai gaeshi (I'm sorry I still don't know how to spell it) or is this a type of yokomenuchi?

Cliff Judge 05-11-2011 09:01 AM

Re: 1st Kumijo
 
Quote:

Jerry Teo wrote: (Post 283531)
Thanks very much for your input guys :D

yes, the strike that I'm referring to is the first head strike.
I wonder what's the difference with that strike and yokomenuchi?
and Saito sensei called it haiyai gaeshi (I'm sorry I still don't know how to spell it) or is this a type of yokomenuchi?

Haiyai gaeshi = quick turn?? Sorry that's not a definitive answer.

That strike is exactly what I would call a yokomenuchi in aiki-jo context. It's jun, not gyakku, as I understand the terms. But I could be wrong about any or all of this.

Dazzler 05-11-2011 09:12 AM

Re: 1st Kumijo
 
Sounds like Hasso Gaeshi?

grondahl 05-11-2011 09:40 AM

Re: 1st Kumijo
 
So the word of Morihiro Saito regarding the strike is not definitive enough? Then what is?

Haiyai gaeshi is a regular term in Iwama style aikijo. It´s quick yokomen. In first kumijo you can do it with one or two haiyai gaeshi depending what version/level you are doing.

Demetrio Cereijo 05-11-2011 09:49 AM

Re: 1st Kumijo
 
It is a yokomen uchi, I understand the "quick turn" as a reference to the need to make a fast transition from the choku tsuki parry to the yokomen.

Ed.
FWIW, in Saito's Traditional Aikido (Vol 2, p. 100) it simply says "jodan gaeshi".

JRY 05-11-2011 11:26 AM

Re: 1st Kumijo
 
Thanks guys! very much appreciated for clearing that up nicely :D
nicely added to my Aikido vocabulary.

Quote:

Peter Gröndahl wrote: (Post 283549)
So the word of Morihiro Saito regarding the strike is not definitive enough? Then what is?

just clearing up the meaning of haiyai gaeshi in this context. I don't think anyone said the word of Saito sensei was not definitive :)

David Partington 05-11-2011 05:19 PM

Re: 1st Kumijo
 
Isn't the attack jodan gaeshi uchi like the 5th jo suburi? but modified because although Saito sensei steps forward with his back foot, he doesn't actually advance towards his partner?

I thought the term "hayai gaeshi" referred to the movement with your feet whereby you change your stance "on the spot" so that your body remains the same distance away from your opponent. In the clip (although I admit not exact), Saito sensei's rear foot (his right) steps up to his front foot (left) and then proceeds to step back (eventually) with his left so that he is now in migi hanmi but no closer to his opponent.

Done at speed the footwork/body movement would tie in with Cliff's translation as quick turn.

Ethan Weisgard 05-24-2011 04:50 PM

Re: 1st Kumijo
 
Saito Sensei would use the term "hayagaeshi" ( "haya" being the abbreviated form of "hayai" - quick, and "gaeshi /kaeshi" - turn) to refer to both the hand movement where you bring the jo up to jodan and rotate it in order to perform a strike (the usual combination for Hayagaeshi is from Tsuki no Kamae - or a completed Tsuki - to Jodan Gaeshi Uchi) as well as to the footwork as described earlier in this thread: right foot steps up to the left and left foot steps back.
So one term, two actual references: tesabaki (hand movements) and/or ashisabaki (foot movements).

In aiki,

Ethan Weisgard


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