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-   -   I.S. the search continues... (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=17596)

Amassus 01-25-2010 09:23 PM

I.S. the search continues...
 
With all this talk of internal strength I started trawling the net for what was out there. This guy came up...
Ken Gullette.
http://www.internalfightingarts.com/...set=s:415-pm:p

Anyone had the opportunity to train with this guy or see him in action?

I understand there are many people practising internal arts and some are sincere while others are fake.
There are people here in the forums who are well networked so I thought I would put this out there.

Just a query.

Dean.

Shane Goodrich 01-26-2010 11:52 AM

Re: I.S. the search continues...
 
Those clips of him in the tourneys looks like standard stuff to me. Not what Dan or Ark do.

Amassus 04-16-2010 07:04 PM

Re: I.S. the search continues...
 
I appreciate the reply, Shane.

Thank you.

dps 04-16-2010 09:29 PM

Re: I.S. the search continues...
 
Here is a clip from his DVD on internal strength.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7rn7xzD7JI

David

Amassus 04-17-2010 02:04 AM

Re: I.S. the search continues...
 
Thanks, David.

Even the exercises shown in that short clip give me something to think about and try with like-minded others.

Much appreciated.

Dean.

dps 04-17-2010 06:34 AM

Re: I.S. the search continues...
 
Quote:

Shane Goodrich wrote: (Post 251104)
Those clips of him in the tourneys looks like standard stuff to me. Not what Dan or Ark do.

Is this like what they do?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7rn7xzD7JI

David

gregstec 04-18-2010 10:24 AM

Re: I.S. the search continues...
 
Quote:

David Skaggs wrote: (Post 255755)
Is this like what they do?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7rn7xzD7JI

David

Yes, these two exercises are very similar to what you would find in a basic workshop with Dan or Mike as well as in most Ki Society's Ki tests. However, I still think that your training needs to be conducted in person with someone else skilled in IP so you can receive supportive feedback on where your skill is as you progress.

Greg

Mike Sigman 04-18-2010 11:52 AM

Re: I.S. the search continues...
 
There's going to be all sorts of levels and gradations of skills, knowledge, etc., out there, so people will have to learn to pick and choose, just like in every other endeavour. There was a thread on QiJin once about "We're not all doing the same thing".... the idea being that every will talk the talk as soon as they get the vocabulary. One thing for certain is that no one can just "get it" because it takes a lot of work and a number of years to reach real expertise; rough and incomplete expertise mixed with a bunch of technique, etc., is going to be what is most commonly found.

FWIW

Mike Sigman

wuyizidi 04-21-2010 11:03 AM

Re: I.S. the search continues...
 
In Aikido, what are the kanji characters for "internal strength"? What is the definition of internal strength?

In Chinese it's 內勁, where I think the better translation is internal force. In Taiji Quan we say at a fundamental level, fighting is about generating a force (not a strength) and affect your opponent with it. There are many different types of forces, each with its own unique set of characteristics - amount, speed, rate of acceleration, duration, timing, direction, store and release process, etc.

Just as there is no one best car, there is no one best type of force, it all depends on what you're trying to do. In Chinese martial art, we classify forces into two broad categories: external and internal. External means from observing the physical movement used to generate that force, you can understand all its characteristics, and deal with it accordingly. Internal refers to ones where the physical movement is so small, so hard to observe, you can only understand it by feeling it. In general you can generate greater amount of forces with external force, whereas with internal force the chief advantage is that they are great for controlling the opponent.

Lots of so called external martial art actually uses internal type of forces too, but usually they don't emphasize it, or make so little use that there's no need to categorize it and study in detail to start with (ex. boxing). Whereas in something like Taiji Quan (and maybe Aikido?), while we do use external force to finish opponent off, the emphasis is on using internal force to unbalance the opponent first. In a complete art we should understand and use all types of forces as appropriate.

The reason I don't like the term "strength", besides it's not the most accurate translation, is that it further feeds into some of the fundamental misconceptions about internal force. When we say strength, of course more is better. But actually, in training we want to develop as much as possible, in fighting use as little as possible. Be efficient is not some nice-to-have thing when you're fighting multiple opponents or have to fight for a long duration. The other misconception being we want internal force because it's something even more powerful (quantity wise) than external force, when in fact we're comparing apples and oranges.

Here's an article that covers the basics on Taiji Quan's approach to use of force: http://www.ycgf.org/Articles/TJ_Jin/TJ_Jin1.html


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