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swchiro 12-29-2009 11:05 PM

Types of "Waza"
 
I am just now undertanding the infinate possibilities of: katamewaza (pinning techniques), nagewaza (throwing tehcniques), kihonwaza (basic techniques ex: ikkyo, kotegashi, iriminage, sokomen, shihonage, jujinage, kaitenage, koshinage), oyawaza (advaned applicationof basic tehcniques), and henkawza (changing techniques)...I know there are several interpretations of these but,....does anyone have a different defintion of these or that can add to them?...

mathewjgano 12-29-2009 11:54 PM

Re: Waza...
 
Quote:

Steven Wasserman wrote: (Post 249180)
I am just now undertanding the infinate possibilities of: katamewaza (pinning techniques), nagewaza (throwing tehcniques), kihonwaza (basic techniques ex: ikkyo, kotegashi, iriminage, sokomen, shihonage, jujinage, kaitenage, koshinage), oyawaza (advaned applicationof basic tehcniques), and henkawza (changing techniques)...I know there are several interpretations of these but,....does anyone have a different defintion of these or that can add to them?...

I don't have a different definition, but I know of osae waza as pinning techniques. Do you or anyone else know if they are interchangeable terms?

sorokod 12-30-2009 12:24 AM

Re: Waza...
 
kaeshi waza, sutemi waza.

Adam Huss 12-30-2009 09:37 AM

Re: Types of "Waza"
 
Here are some definitions I wrangled up:

osae: control, a check, a weight
(1)katame: one eye
(2)katame: hardening, defense, fortifying, pledge

That being said, understand that many terms used in martial arts are in a certain context which non-initiated native Japanese speakers may not understand. This could be due to the esoteric nature of the term used (ie, suigetsu zuki) or because its an antiquated term (ie, hiriki).

At our school many martial arts are practiced. We try to distinguish differences when practicing each martial art: both technique and term. Some terms are used for, say judo, more frequently than aikido...and vice versa. Technique-wise we try to do things like keeping are feet together for judo throws, but having them about shoulder width apart for aikido (even if its the same throw)...or even having a hip level hikite for taw kwon do, and one about chest high for karate.

Michael Hackett 12-30-2009 10:23 AM

Re: Types of "Waza"
 
I'm from the same tradition as Steve, but I've heard "Osae Komi Waza" for pinning techniques as well. I think that usage comes from Aiki Jujutsu and is used with Yoseikan Budo, but I'm not sure.

swchiro 01-01-2010 10:27 PM

Re: Types of "Waza"
 
Mike, I think you are correct...I am trying to understand the definitions of waza as described by each Sensei, Toyoda Sensei and Sato Sensei...going over old tapes, etc....Good to see ya here...

swchiro 01-01-2010 11:05 PM

Re: Waza...
 
Quote:

Matthew Gano wrote: (Post 249182)
I don't have a different definition, but I know of osae waza as pinning techniques. Do you or anyone else know if they are interchangeable terms?

not at this time....these defintions of waza are very vague subjects to many instructors, and then different according to the organization you belong to....!

Melchizedek 01-03-2010 05:35 AM

Re: Types of "Waza"
 
Quote:

Steven Wasserman wrote: (Post 249180)
I am just now undertanding the infinate possibilities of: katamewaza (pinning techniques), nagewaza (throwing tehcniques), kihonwaza (basic techniques ex: ikkyo, kotegashi, iriminage, sokomen, shihonage, jujinage, kaitenage, koshinage), oyawaza (advaned applicationof basic tehcniques), and henkawza (changing techniques)...I know there are several interpretations of these but,....does anyone have a different defintion of these or that can add to them?...

thanks I get more from it! 5/5


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