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-   -   Teachine outline needed (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=16504)

bklynjames 07-21-2009 02:37 PM

Teachine outline needed
 
Hi all,
I was wondering if someone could post or recommend a teaching outline. Both daily and yearly, heres what im looking for.

1- A good breakdown of a class.
- Warmup
- Meditation
- Techniques
- Warmdown
2- Yearly, What im looking to do with a class for the long run. Meaning what to work on to build certain skills and techniques.

Sorry for being so direct...
Thank you,

dalen7 07-21-2009 04:26 PM

Re: Teachine outline needed
 
Quote:

James McDermott wrote: (Post 235223)
Hi all,
I was wondering if someone could post or recommend a teaching outline. Both daily and yearly, heres what im looking for.

1- A good breakdown of a class.
- Warmup
- Meditation
- Techniques
- Warmdown
2- Yearly, What im looking to do with a class for the long run. Meaning what to work on to build certain skills and techniques.

Sorry for being so direct...
Thank you,

This will vary Im sure, and I will summarize my ideas like this:

1- warmup, but dont spend half the class doing it... [we tend to over warmup, in the summer its a bit too much.] :)

2- meditation, when you sit in seiza, its up to you how long this is... but you can feel when people start to drop their buzzing minds.
3- Techniques
You should have time for:
a. beginners
b. mixed
c. advanced kyu ranks

This all depends on how many days you practice, if you only meet twice a week, then you can divide the time up in half to focus on specific training. [something I wish we would do as we tend to be left without focusing on the material relevant to our kyu rank] ;)

4. Warmdown...
Sometimes we take turns loading one another on our backs to stretch. Even doing some slower techniques to match the flow of uke and tori can be good.

Again, you ultimately will go with the flow of your dojo.
I suppose if I had a dojo I would eventually have it broken up further for those who want to keep Aikido more of a fluid movement, and then have another class where its a bit more rough/live, as it were. [some grappling, etc.]

Peace

dAlen

p.s.
Also, if your starting a dojo, good to have some experience behind you - not sure how much you have, but the experience you have will tend to lend itself to how you will structure your dojo I believe. ;)

bklynjames 07-21-2009 09:36 PM

Re: Teachine outline needed
 
Hi,
Im a 1st Kyu goin for Shodan in December. But would like to teach to help my training for shodan. Our school has alot of classes and a rotation schedule on Saturdays for newer instructors to teach. This is where I will start and would like to have as many opinions as possible.
Thank you in advance...

Janet Rosen 07-21-2009 11:23 PM

Re: Teachine outline needed
 
Please excuse this non-teacher for butting into this forum...but I have to say, from a sports physiology perspective, to warm up and then to meditate would be counterproductive - why increase body/muscle temperature, get the body primed to train, then sit and cool down while meditating? I would strongly recommend meditating first, then a warmup NOT of stretches but of gentle range of motion that mimics the muscle movements to be used during training, plus rolling. Cooling down after training could include stretching.

dalen7 07-22-2009 04:45 AM

Re: Teachine outline needed
 
Quote:

Janet Rosen wrote: (Post 235251)
Please excuse this non-teacher for butting into this forum...but I have to say, from a sports physiology perspective, to warm up and then to meditate would be counterproductive - why increase body/muscle temperature, get the body primed to train, then sit and cool down while meditating? I would strongly recommend meditating first, then a warmup NOT of stretches but of gentle range of motion that mimics the muscle movements to be used during training, plus rolling. Cooling down after training could include stretching.

very true... meditation is what we start out with... [should have reflected that in my list - though its to late to edit, consider it changed!] :)

- dAlen

Amir Krause 07-22-2009 07:36 AM

Re: Teachine outline needed
 
Quote:

James McDermott wrote: (Post 235248)
Hi,
Im a 1st Kyu goin for Shodan in December. But would like to teach to help my training for shodan. Our school has alot of classes and a rotation schedule on Saturdays for newer instructors to teach. This is where I will start and would like to have as many opinions as possible.
Thank you in advance...

Two simple advices

1 - teach as your teacher does.
--------------------------------------------------

Teaching M.A. is an art onto itself.
So, as you start, I recommend you to do it in the same way as any other M.A. excercise - emulate your teacher to the best of your ability.

This is also better for the students - they are used to a certain way of teaching and explenations.

2 - Teach only things you know well
------------------------------------------------------
Do not experiment, and do not deviate from the curriculum you know well. The students come to learn from you, not to be part of an experiment.
If you have a new idea, check it! But, do your checking somewhere else, and not with your class.

BR
Amir

NagaBaba 07-23-2009 10:51 AM

Re: Teachine outline needed
 
Quote:

James McDermott wrote: (Post 235223)
Hi all,
I was wondering if someone could post or recommend a teaching outline. Both daily and yearly, heres what im looking for.

1- A good breakdown of a class.
- Warmup
- Meditation
- Techniques
- Warmdown
2- Yearly, What im looking to do with a class for the long run. Meaning what to work on to build certain skills and techniques.

Sorry for being so direct...
Thank you,

As Janet wrote, 'meditation' is in wrong place.
1.
I'd start with weapons training 10-15 minutes. There are many reasons for that, one is the weapons give you right spirit for practice.
Then warmup - I agree with Janet, avoid stretching completely. 10 minutes intensive workout to really warm body(with jogging, jumping, pushups...etc). If you don't know how to do it, look at judo warmup, it is a good start.
Then go for techniques.
In the end it is right time to stretch.

2.
First you need to have regular testing time over a year(you or your instructor). It gives you time frame to prepare your students to test.
Second, you should teach minimum two basic techniques per class.
Third, you should teach principles, not techniques. The techniques are simply the tools to develop correct body conditioning of your students.If you are not able to do it, you should'nt be teaching.

Also you need some kind of environment to give your students opportunity to learn application of techniques - it can be jyu waza(with single or multiple attackers).

Teaching meditation it is a separate subject in separate class.

hope it helps.

NagaBaba 07-23-2009 12:24 PM

Re: Teachine outline needed
 
Quote:

Amir Krause wrote: (Post 235273)
Two simple advices

1 - teach as your teacher does.
Amir

I disagree. 99% aikido teachers don't know how to teach effectively.You have very low chance to follow somebody with good teaching skills.

Instead go to local university, and take specialized courses, they will teach you how to use modern methodology to teach pll.

Joe Bowen 07-24-2009 07:01 AM

Re: Teachine outline needed
 
1 Attachment(s)
James,

A good book on the topic: Martial Arts Instruction: Applying Educational Theory & Communication Techniques in the Dojo by Lawrence A. Kane. While this is not an Aikido centric book, it does have some good ideas about teaching a martial art. Additionally, the British Aikido Board (BAB) which serves as an umbrella organization for all aikido in the UK for insurance and certification of instructors, teaches "Coach" certification courses. They have a pretty good "scheme of work" for laying out the program for the coming year. While the BAB does not enforce the use of any type of structured syllabus for the various dojos under it, the formatting which is easily formatable in an excell spread sheet would readily allow you to program out all of your classes for any given time period. I like it, but since I'm not the primary instructor where I train, I don't currently use it. I've scanned the scheme of work for a 10 class beginners' scheme of work that I created. Feel free to use it if you like. If you want to have the excel spread sheet for the blank scheme of work, send me an email and I'll email it to you.


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