AikiWeb Aikido Forums

AikiWeb Aikido Forums (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/index.php)
-   General (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=1)
-   -   Aikido and cross-training (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15122)

CarrieP 09-15-2008 01:54 PM

Aikido and cross-training
 
The other thread about the evolution of Aikido has gotten me thinking more about Aikido and cross-training. I figured it was a different enough subject to warrant its own thread.

What are the general thoughts about doing other martial arts, or conditioning, as supplements to aikido? Not necesarily to replace it, or to evolve the practice, but as complimentary cross-training? Are there arts that are better fits to Aikido, and others that clash?

I've got some thoughts on this as well, but I wanted to pose the question and generate some discussion first before posting them.

lbb 09-15-2008 03:00 PM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
I think it's great in theory, harder to pull off in practice. Most people can't find the time to properly train in one martial art, let alone two. I think that's a realistic consideration. If you have to cut back on aikido and can only give one evening every other week to studying your new martial art (because your SO will kill you if you spend one more week at the dojo, any damn dojo), how much will you gain from it (particularly as a newbie)?

salim 09-15-2008 04:31 PM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
Quote:

Carolyn Parkinson wrote: (Post 216236)
The other thread about the evolution of Aikido has gotten me thinking more about Aikido and cross-training. I figured it was a different enough subject to warrant its own thread.

What are the general thoughts about doing other martial arts, or conditioning, as supplements to aikido? Not necesarily to replace it, or to evolve the practice, but as complimentary cross-training? Are there arts that are better fits to Aikido, and others that clash?

I've got some thoughts on this as well, but I wanted to pose the question and generate some discussion first before posting them.

Cross training is always useful and I would say, never let anyone discouraged you from exploring the realm of finding out who you are. Especially if your aim is to learn how to use your mind and body in ways that you have never imagined. If one of your goals is to learn how to manipulate any given situation to best of your ability, then cross training will only enhance and elevate your growth substantially.

I love to cross train and participate in cross training every chance I get. Keep your mind open and your options unlimited, surely it's more healthy and more productivity to have a diversified array of self help abilities. Your mind and body should have no limits, no barriers, no constraints, just find who you are is the key. It will make you self defense abilities much more sound.

Here's a fantastic video to view, showing the abilities of cross training. I hope you enjoy.

http://www.roydeanacademy.com/video/..._the_wristlock

Kevin Leavitt 09-15-2008 06:27 PM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
It depends on your goals and persepctive Salim gives some good advice.

I view aikido not as a separate and distinct thing, but as a methodology to achieve an endstate, which is "aligned" with the "aiki-do" methodology of training, but is not necessarily "owned" by that methdology.

As such, it allows me to explore and not be defined or constrained by someones definitions of "what is" and "what isn't".

So, based on that, I don't see it so much as "cross training"...but simply "training" or better yet "BUDO".

Many of us have found that there are exercises and practices that are maybe not done or concentrated on in our dojos. This may be for a multitude of reasons. One which is the element of time.

So, IMO, in order to get better, it requires you to put in time outside of the dojo.

IT could be doing supplemental stuff that your sensei gives you, yoga, aunkai, uechi ruy karate, or whatever else you do that helps you better understand things.

Most though I think, especially in the beginning have enough to do just doing the basics that their sensei give them to do.

You can be a mile wide and have no depth as well so you have to consider that too.

Mastery is a tough thing that requires alot of soul searching and individual effort as well as good teachers to mentor you.

Good luck in your journey.

CarrieP 09-15-2008 09:09 PM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
Thanks for the thoughtful replies and comments.

As such, my question is more an intellectual exercise more than anything at this time. I've been training for less than a year, and just passed my first test a couple months ago, so I don't have the time or the skills to try something else with any sort of commitment.

But there are times that my dojo will do some grappling, or I'll have a chance to pick up a yoga class or two, or try to train endurance-wise for a 5K, where it comes into play.

To Mary: me and my Mister were hoping to get around the mat-time vs quality time issue by training together. But we're still working that out. He's extremely busy 9 months of the year (teacher) and can't put in the time to train as often as I can.

I appreciate all the perspectives.

grondahl 09-16-2008 02:15 AM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
I consider general conditioning much more important than aikido when looking at the big picture of life.
Aikido can provide som core-strenght, cardio and general flexibility but the individual needs to keep themselves fit outside of class.

Two articles well worth reading:
http://www.24fightingchickens.com/20...ace-of-karate/

http://www.24fightingchickens.com/20...ously-thought/

thomas.martinez 09-16-2008 04:57 AM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
Intellectual exercise may apply to focus on your "hara." Flow your inter-energy throughout your "te" outward. Not using any of your physical strength.

phitruong 09-16-2008 09:20 AM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
taichi (the good kind, not the YMCA type, maybe) and yoga worked well with aikido.

phitruong 09-16-2008 09:24 AM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
forgot to mention of systema. lots of good stuffs there if you can skip the camo stuffs.

SeiserL 09-16-2008 10:51 AM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
I am a big fan of cross-training. Initially it is important to keep them separate in thinking and training and let them integrate by themselves. Also, second the idea of conditioning.

Walter Martindale 09-17-2008 05:11 PM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
Back in the day at the Kodokan, I was told of a famous judo athlete who said he only "did" judo. When seen pushing huge hunks of steel in the Kodokan weight room, and quizzed about this, he said "this is judo preparation" or something like that.
Going for a run is cross-training. So is the weight room. So is trying another martial art, going for a swim, hiking, rowing, or whatever, including even target shooting for concentration skills. It all adds up.
W

Stefan Stenudd 09-17-2008 05:45 PM

Major and minor
 
I'm all for cross training. I've practiced iaido almost as long as aikido - although not as much.

Maybe it's important to be consistent with what is one's major in the martial arts. Otherwise there is a risk of getting more confused than skilled. Also, from the :do: perspective, knowing one's major path is quite essential.

I also discourage complete beginners from trying to learn more than one martial art simultaneously. That would make it hard for them to find some clarity, and to pass the beginner phase.

Other than that - go for it! Actually, it's essential to become familiar with other martial arts in order to properly understand how to attack correctly as uke.

seank 09-17-2008 09:18 PM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
I very much like the idea of cross-training, but as Sugano shihan replied to my question about such, "... it is difficult to climb more than one mountain at a time."

I've trained in other martial arts, mainly kyokushin, and have found the correlations between kyokushin and aikido to be both engrossing and challenging.

I think that it would take a very talented person to practice, learn and integrate two or more arts simultaneously though. The mind also boggles at the juggling of time as far as classes and sessions goes ;)

gdandscompserv 09-18-2008 06:35 AM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
Quote:

Phi Truong wrote: (Post 216310)
forgot to mention of systema. lots of good stuffs there if you can skip the camo stuffs.

Hey, I like the camo stuffs.:cool:

DonMagee 09-18-2008 07:32 AM

Re: Aikido and cross-training
 
For me I would always advise physical fitness (running, weights, whatever). But in terms of crosstraining martial arts, I would say it is great, but proceed with caution.

Training arts that complement each other well and stay out of each other's respective areas will be great for you. For example, bjj and mauy thai. A lot of students train both of these from the start. One focuses on solid striking, the other on solid grappling. In this way you are not going to get confused between the two.

A less great example would be TKD and Karate. They are very similar, but have differences that are going to frustrate you and your instructors during training. Both are striking systems, and keeping the 'uniqueness' of the systems will be hard if you just jump into both. Get a solid base in one, and the other could prove useful.

However, when it comes to grappling, I firmly believe that grappling is grappling. This is why I encourage new bjj students to try out the judo classes or wrestling classes as much as a possible too. BJJ has different strategy and philosophy about fighting, but the techniques are all the same.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:59 AM.

Powered by: vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.