AikiWeb Aikido Forums

AikiWeb Aikido Forums (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/index.php)
-   Training (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=15)
-   -   Menace 2 society (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=9178)

O-Ren 10-30-2005 06:58 AM

Menace 2 society
 
I don't know just what's going on hear but it seems that in the past couple of classes I have been given bad ukemi. Either that or uke just isn't on the ball. I ask Sensei what I'm doing wrong, he says my technique is good. Any one ever have a similar experience? By the by, I'm only a 5th kyu so that might have something to do with it. Anyone have a suggestion on how to elevate this. I would appreciate anything.

Regards O-ren

P.S. I pissed no icons 8(

Amir Krause 10-30-2005 10:19 AM

Re: Menace 2 society
 
It is impossible to say much without seeing. The secret is in both sides understanding that being Uke is as teaching as being Tori.

Amir

justin 10-30-2005 10:47 AM

Re: Menace 2 society
 
i to have bad days where it hurts and others where i come out not feeling a thing, did try and work it out couldnt so guess i shall just train through it and with more experience under my belt so to speak hopefully i will make light of it

Mark Uttech 10-30-2005 02:10 PM

Re: Menace 2 society
 
I would venture to say that being a 5th kyu has something to do with it, and that is all right. Your views will change as you go.

Kevin Leavitt 10-30-2005 03:21 PM

Re: Menace 2 society
 
I agree with Mark.

AIkido is an interesting art. You can master the techniques and skills and cognitively know them cold, yet some days, weeks, or months you just can't seem to quite be in the zone.

I was suprised several years ago when I took off about a year and a half and came back cold into a big seminar how well my aikido improved during that year and a half. While I had been into meditation, had worked on alot of mental aspects of budo, I had not praticed aikido for that time.

I was in the zone and in my game! It was amazing how relaxed and how everything flowed.

That ended a few weeks later it seemed as I picked apart my technique and got back into trying to "get better".

I attribute a great deal of what happens to the mental and emotional aspects.

As a 5th Kyu, you are probably experiencing all this at once. Sometimes you are good and master the techniques, then WOW! you are hot, then all of a sudden you just can't seem to get it right for whatever reason!

I think we all experience this from time to time. I think higher ranking students are able to "shorten this cycle" more as they develop themselves in all three realms of mental, physical, and spirtual. (at least I hope that is the case!) :)

James Davis 10-31-2005 11:41 AM

Re: Menace 2 society
 
Quote:

Kevin Leavitt wrote:
I agree with Mark.

AIkido is an interesting art. You can master the techniques and skills and cognitively know them cold, yet some days, weeks, or months you just can't seem to quite be in the zone.

I was suprised several years ago when I took off about a year and a half and came back cold into a big seminar how well my aikido improved during that year and a half. While I had been into meditation, had worked on alot of mental aspects of budo, I had not praticed aikido for that time.

I was in the zone and in my game! It was amazing how relaxed and how everything flowed.

That ended a few weeks later it seemed as I picked apart my technique and got back into trying to "get better".

I attribute a great deal of what happens to the mental and emotional aspects.

As a 5th Kyu, you are probably experiencing all this at once. Sometimes you are good and master the techniques, then WOW! you are hot, then all of a sudden you just can't seem to get it right for whatever reason!

I think we all experience this from time to time. I think higher ranking students are able to "shorten this cycle" more as they develop themselves in all three realms of mental, physical, and spirtual. (at least I hope that is the case!) :)

Don't give too much of a damn. Just pay attentioin and let the learning happen. It's kind of like dating, I guess; the harder you try the more you're likely to fail. ;) Aikido, like love, sometimes comes when we're not looking so hard for it. :)

MaryKaye 10-31-2005 01:20 PM

Re: Menace 2 society
 
I thought I had one of our solo exercises down, and then the head instructor made a small correction and now I can't do it at all. (Our blue-belt twelve-year-old was asked to lead it for the class, which gives him the right to make comments: he looked at me and said, "Hate to say it, Mary, but you look like a robot.")

This just happens, and eventually things will get better. If it's any comfort, it will probably keep happening all the way along your aikido career, but the level you rise to each time you recover will be higher.

Mary Kaye

O-Ren 11-05-2005 01:04 AM

Re: Menace 2 society
 
Thank you all for the wonderful replies, I appreciate them very much. I know I didn't elaborate all that much, that post was writing in hast. What happens is the uke kind of just flails to the ground, then make sounds like it hurt. I have been trying something new like focusing on connecting to there center, blinding and connecting then just concentrating on how to perform the technique. So maybe I'm releasing uke to early or something like that? Don't know. Please, if anyone else can relate fill free the chime in. T H A N K S

Regards O-ren

jss 11-05-2005 04:46 AM

Re: Menace 2 society
 
It happens to me too when training with beginners.
If I am too careful (restraining my technique), my technique will fail (not good) and the beginner won't improve his/her ukemi (even worse). If I am not careful enough, the beginner will learn ukemi the 'old skool' way :freaky: (not good and not nice). The trick is to do something in between and try to throw in such a way that uke will have to try really hard to take bad ukemi, which is quite the technical challenge.

What also may be happening is that your throws are really throws, which in my opinion is not necessary during practice. I try to disbalance uke to a point where my hold is the only suppport they have and then I remove that support, but I won't apply any extra force downwards.
Shiho-nage is a good example. Even if you want to control uke on the ground, you remove the support you're giving, but keeping your hold on uke's wrist you follow the falling motion, without forcing the arm (and thus uke) to the ground.

Of course, it can be something else altogether. :D


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:59 PM.

Powered by: vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.