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-   -   "solo" training? (http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=22313)

Messias 02-11-2013 05:27 AM

"solo" training?
 
Hi there,

Today itīs a national Holiday in Brasil (Carnaval) and everything is closed until further notice, so I was wondering if you have some exercises that can be done when you are alone.
For me itīs probably too soon for trying to do something on my own besides ukemi (and I have a small living room, so that is out as well), but is it possible to train the techniques by yourself?

Cheers,
Messias.

Demetrio Cereijo 02-11-2013 08:41 AM

Re: "solo" training?
 
Samba... for the hips.

:)

Messias 02-11-2013 10:36 AM

Re: "solo" training?
 
:D
eheheheh...

phitruong 02-11-2013 01:51 PM

Re: "solo" training?
 
Quote:

Demetrio Cereijo wrote: (Post 323434)
Samba... for the hips.

:)

tango for the ladies :)

Dave de Vos 02-11-2013 02:01 PM

Re: "solo" training?
 
Quote:

Phi Truong wrote: (Post 323445)
tango for the ladies :)

A friend of mine would advise bachata for that!

lbb 02-11-2013 02:51 PM

Re: "solo" training?
 
Solo aikido training is difficult, especially if you're pretty new to it. Here's an idea for something you can try, that might be both fun and educational:

Part 1: practice tai sabaki (footwork). Start with the basics. Every step you make, check and correct, check and correct. Are your feet where they should be, lined up as they should be? Is your weight where it should be? Are your hips oriented correctly? Check and correct. Do that until you are doing the basic tai sabaki correctly, then start to combine them. Irimi tenkan. Irimi kaiten. Et cetera. Again, check and correct, check and correct.

Part 2: go to youtube and find some aikido videos of techniques that you know. Watch the videos and identify the footwork being used. Is this how you're used to seeing it done? If not, how is it different? Could it be done another way?

Footwork is one of the most fundamental skills in aikido, and I think that for most of us, the ability to observe is another. Trying to practice waza without a partner is probably a waste of time, but perhaps you can get some good practice of some of the skills that are the foundation of waza.

Messias 02-12-2013 04:04 AM

Re: "solo" training?
 
Hi there,

Thank you, lbb. Thatīs exactly what I meant! Something that could be done "solo" and would somehow benefit the learnings on the matt.
Iīll have a look into what you said.

And thank you to all the dancing suggestions, but I guess my wife wonīt be too happy with me dancing the Samba/Lambada, especially in this time of the year...:p

Cheers,
Messias.

Dan Richards 02-14-2013 03:56 PM

Re: "solo" training?
 
Messias, training solo really is a large part of effective training, even after people have been on the mat for years. In fact, after awhile, the training can become part of everyday life - even in the way we sit, stand, walk, move, open doors, put the dishes away. There's always places to study and play around. It actually becomes a sort of mindfulness - an attention, an opening in consciousness that can help keep us more awake.

I think if more people would train solo before they ever even stepped on the mat, they'd be more prepared to really learn. A lot of people who come into aikido have to actually be deprogrammed, and rewired. The main thing we run into, especially in the West, is the idea that large muscle groups and their use are our source of strength. We can move into an entirely different level of strength by disengaging the large muscle groups and tapping into the intrinsic strength in the body's natural design.

I'm actually working on developing something especially for people like you, who are remote and may not have access at times to training places. And even for people who do train, as something supplemental on aspects that might not be so readily apparent.

Have a look at this video, in which I explain that your skin is what makes the structure of your body.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybVBN2qUFFA

Michael Hackett 02-14-2013 04:43 PM

Re: "solo" training?
 
Felipe, you might consider doing the aiki taiso exercises that Tohei sensei propounded. Fune kogi undo and so forth are excellent exercises for developing aikido movement and I believe all of our techniques can be found in those movements. You Tube has plenty of example videos. We do them at the start of every class. I learn something each and every time that translates to what we do later that same class. I do them at home frequently and find they help.

Adam Huss 02-15-2013 08:13 AM

Re: "solo" training?
 
Given your small space you could practice knee walking techniques. I often do weapons when training by myself. If possible I would recommend asking your teacher or senior to allow you to video tape any solo exercises such as kata, suburi, aiki taiso, tai sabaki or whatever similar things are taught in your dojo. That way you can use it as a reference for training when the dojo is closed or you are traveling. I would keep it simple though, you don't want to overburden yourself!

bkaaria 05-16-2016 11:50 AM

Re: "solo" training?
 
Hello. I am very happy to be associated with this community.

I hope to learn alot.

rugwithlegs 05-16-2016 03:56 PM

Re: "solo" training?
 
Many schools in Aikido have some solo practices. Some serve a variety of purposes, some are specific. I was given recipes and 100 day assignments many times. Ki no taiso, Aiki Shin Taiso, Aikiken or Aikijo, musubi no Ken or Jo, whatever.

The problem was I had a life outside of the dojo. For example, around day 88 once I joined my dad for a 90 kilometer cross country skiing event. I felt guilty that my jello legs were not up to the solo exercises, then realized 90 kilometers of skiing certainly counted as training!

Exercise counts, meditation counts, reading counts - even taking a chance to watch the best judoka, boxers and wrestlers on the planet compete at the Olympics coming up soon in Brazil I believe has something to inform my practice. I see this is a resurrected thread, but dancing in Carnaval - heck yes it counts as training for me.

fatebass21 12-29-2016 01:18 PM

Re: "solo" training?
 
How about session warmups and practicing techniques involving tenkan while visualizing the other person there.

After several instances of leaving the mat for a few years, this was the only thing that kept me involved in Aikido. Studying at home has brought me many benefits even when I wasn't technically advancing my training onsite.

I try to do a class warmup at home every day.

ninjedi 03-29-2017 03:31 PM

Re: "solo" training?
 
No mention of the do kihon dosa yet? These are fantastic for solo practice.

Currawong 03-29-2017 06:40 PM

Re: "solo" training?
 
Funnily enough, it was the kihon dosa that inspired a training method I used to improve my, and subsequently other people's tasabaki.

Quote:

Mary Malmros wrote: (Post 323450)
Part 1: practice tai sabaki (footwork). Start with the basics. Every step you make, check and correct, check and correct. Are your feet where they should be, lined up as they should be? Is your weight where it should be? Are your hips oriented correctly? Check and correct. Do that until you are doing the basic tai sabaki correctly, then start to combine them. Irimi tenkan. Irimi kaiten. Et cetera. Again, check and correct, check and correct.

To add to this excellent advice, here is what I practice:

As we tend to over-focus on our arms, I first start taisabaki practice by sticking my thumbs in my belt (or pants) and then practicing. As my hands are in front of my center, they can't screw up my focus.

Second, I take my hands out and relax them 100% and practice again. They must be relaxed 100% and the speed and rhythm of one's movement will be entirely related to that of one's arms.

Third, I practice the same but with movements from incoming attacks (shomen-uchi, tsuki), using my arms in the most relaxed way possible, the focus entirely on my center body. The aim is to have one's arms not interfering with the turning movement, so requires some experimentation with finding the ideal, and most relaxed movement.

I also extend this with longer or shorter steps and slower and faster turning around my center line. I've also found that any movement practice based on a technique, or parts of it to be very helpful.

I now also practice some of the drills on https://trueaiki.com and various methods documented on pages such as here: http://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/...-ryu-aikibudo/


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