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My Path Blog Tools Rating: Rate This Blog
Creation Date: 06-08-2009 01:55 PM
Linda Eskin
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My path to and through Aikido. Observations on Aikido, horses, & life, by a 51 y/o 1st kyu.

This same blog (with photos and a few additional trivial posts, but without comments) can be found at www.grabmywrist.com.

I train with Dave Goldberg Sensei, at Aikido of San Diego.
Blog Info
Status: Public
Entries: 209
Comments: 359
Views: 314,471

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In Horses O Sensei Raised Horses!!! Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #149 New 02-20-2012 12:30 AM
I have wondered about this, and tried to find any information on whether O Sensei may have kept horses, or worked with them. I thought maybe... I knew he was a farmer, but he could have farmed by hand, or with oxen. I had not found any mention of horses, until just now, in The Art of Peace, by Morihei Ueshiba & John Stevens. From Part One - Morihei Ueshiba, Prophet of the Art of Peace:
"Looking for new worlds to conquer, in 1912 Morihei led a group of settlers from Tanabe to the wilds of Hokkaikdo, Japan's northernmost, largely undeveloped island. The group settled in remote Shirataki, and started to build a village from scratch. Morihei worked tirelessly to make the project a success. He put up buildings; cleared the land for the cultivation of potatoes, peppermint, and sesame; engaged in prudent logging of the great forests; raised horses; and eventually served as a local councilman. (Despite Morihei's great efforts, the settlement never really succeeded. Crops failed the first few years, and there was a disastrous fire in 1916 that destroyed 80 percent of the village, including Morihei's first home. Morihei did learn how to tame wild animals, though, becoming pals with several big Hokkaido bears.)"
O Sensei raised horses!!!

If anyone has more information, details, stories, references, anything, I'd love to know about it. Did he ride? Did he train them? Use them as draft animals? Did he raise them for sale? For meat? I'd love to add notes here with any links, book ...More Read More
Views: 974 | Comments: 8


In Spiritual Life in the Dream World Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #148 New 02-17-2012 02:05 AM
A couple of years ago, after my first few months in Aikido, I had a vivid dream, which I posted about then. When I woke up I could see and feel it in great detail, and I still can. It wasn't until later that day I realized it was about Aikido.

In the dream I suddenly found myself in a totally unfamiliar, incomprehensible new world. A simple, quiet, calm place, where the people seemed to share a sense of purpose and belonging. Sensei was an old, wise woman, a compassionate leader, trusted by the people. I knew there was no going back, that this was to be my new life. I was upset, but I knew I was safe. I knew the leader and the people could be trusted.

And that's exactly how it's been.

On a recent Thursday evening, just two days before a friend's exam for 4th kyu, I limped into the dojo hoping I could at least sit for the 15 minutes of meditation before class. I had gotten out of a chair the wrong way, and badly screwed up something in my right hip. I'd been kept up by the pain most of the previous night, and had only gotten around the house that day by using a jo as a walking stick. My dear husband, Michael, drove me to the dojo, because he knows how I am. He insisted that I go, if only to watch. Bless his heart.

I had been training with my friend for her exam. When I got to the dojo I told Sensei that I wouldn't be able to take ukemi for her - he'd need to find someone else. In the past, never half as bad as this time, it had taken weeks for my hip to get bette ...More Read More
Views: 911


In Off The Mat Aikido Stop Resisting. Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #147 New 02-14-2012 11:43 PM
It's funny how we have to keep learning the same thing over, and over, and over, and over again. An old lesson looks unfamiliar in a new situation. Principles that are old friends in one context seem strange when seen in a different light.

The lesson? Stop resisting. Stop denying. Stop wishing. Notice. Feel. Become aware of the actual direction of the energy. Not your story about it. Not how it was supposed to be. Not how you meant to have it work out.

Notice what's actually happening. Blend with that. Align with that. Move into that. Use that. Act from that.

Being in harmony with the reality of the circumstances is the only place you have any power. You can't act from resistance, denial, and wishing. Effective action is only possible from awareness and acceptance. Not resignation, acceptance.

This is what's so. Stop dragging your feet, and move.

I think I get it… Again.
Views: 853 | Comments: 2


In General Master Pat, A True Force of Nature Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #146 New 02-13-2012 09:36 AM
This is a guest post, by Michael Hancock, one our instructors at Aikido of San Diego. Originally from England, he teaches, and leads meditations, with a lovely Brit-dialect, respect for tradition, thoughtful insight, and a gentle sense of humor. Michael is an avid golfer, pilot and horseman, and when living in England was an accomplished polo player, having once been Chairman of the oldest club in the world, Silver Leys. He is an entrepreneur whose focus is on his family and community. Among other things, Michael is active in promoting and advising the Wampler Foundation, providing camp and outdoor education programs for kids with physical disabilities. Enjoy.

-----
Master Pat - A True Force of Nature
By Michael Hancock
Written Early 2011

Because my Google search gave me little since he received an honor from the Japanese Ambassador on behalf of the Emperor in London several years back, I wrongly assumed he had since passed on. I'm back in England, and last night, by chance or providence, I'm nearby the dojo of ‘Master Pat' Stratford, my first mentor.

It was 7.25 pm for the 7.30 start and the door was still locked. He looked old to me 25 years ago, but I was still surprised to see a pensioner struggling to climb out of someone's car and stagger across on crutches at 7.29 on the dot. Yes, same face and instantly recognizable except for a few more good vintages behind him. For a fleeting moment I wondered if this was a good idea, but I reintroduced myself anyw ...More Read More
Views: 1248 | Comments: 6


In Training Diary My Aikido Teachers Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #145 New 01-31-2012 10:42 AM
This is sort of a sister post to My Aikido Timeline. Here I'll try to keep track of all the teachers I've had the privilege of training under. They are listed starting at the beginning, with most recent additions at the bottom, in order by the first time I trained with each. I will be adding to this post over time. Putting this list together just reminds me of how extraordinarily fortunate I am to have had this breadth of experience.

This is the initial version of this post. I will be keeping it up to date, more or less, here: www.grabmywrist.com > my-aikido-teachers

Dave Goldberg Sensei
Chief Instructor, Aikido of San Diego
May 5, 2009 - My first day of Aikido training
To Present - Hundreds of training days, many workshops, and seminars.

Mike Coit
Instructor, Aikido of San Diego
May 9, 2009 - My second day of training, and many classes since.

Karen Kustejo
Instructor, Aikido of San Diego
May, 2009 to Present - Many classes.

Jay Palm
Instructor, Aikido of San Diego
May, 2009 to Present - Many classes.

Megan Palm
Instructor, Aikido of San Diego
May, 2009 to Present - Many classes.

Andy
Instructor, Aikido of San Diego
May - December 2009 - Various classes (mostly weapons).

Cyril Poissonnet
Instructor, Aikido of San Diego
May, 2009 to Present - Many classes.

Jason Lim
Instructor, Aikido of San Diego
May, 2009 to Present - Many classes (mostly weapons).

Michael Hancock
Instructor, Aikido of San Diego
May, 2009 to Pre ...More Read More
Views: 889


In General My 2nd Kyu Exam (video) Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #144 New 01-26-2012 11:04 PM
I suppose it's a good sign that I'm too busy training to do much posting. Catching up a little, from last weekend, heres the video of my 2nd kyu exam. I couldn't do suwariwaza (goshdarnit!) because my leg kept going into spasms. Other than that, I had fun, and discovered a hundred more things to work on next.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CicJQO_q0UY&hd=1

My 2nd kyu Aikido exam, on 21 January, 2012. Many thanks to my mentor and uke, Cyril Poissonnet, 3rd Dan, whose teaching, coaching, and encouragement have been an important and happy part of my Aikido training from the beginning, and to Dave Goldberg Sensei, and all the teachers and students at Aikido of San Diego.

It's been a steady stream of "aha" moments since my exam. More to come on that soon.
Views: 762 | Comments: 2


In General The Bridge Seminar 2012, Days 2-5 Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #143 New 01-18-2012 11:39 PM
Well, fine. I can't train 6 hours a day and keep up with blogging at the same time. So, here's a bit of catching up.

The seminar was a wonderful experience, with the ouchy exception of some persistent leg muscle spasms that started a couple of weeks ago. I got through most of it, and had a good deal of fun, but was also pretty limited in what I could do, and distracted, which was unfortunate.

There were 6 guest instructors in addition to the main 3. Here's a quick summary of a few of the classes, to the best of my recollection.

Troy Farrow Sensei taught on Friday morning. We worked on a variety of swirly techniques from gyakute-dori (cross-hand grab), including one I do all the time in jiyuwaza, but can recall ever seeing anyone teach it. It was a fun, high-energy class, and a great way to get going in the morning.

Friday evening's class was led by Greg O'Conner Sensei, who I had the pleasure of training with at the Aiki Retreat last summer, too. His focus was on movements coming from sword technique, with a lot of cutting energy.

On Friday night I hustled out the door and back to my home dojo, Aikido of San Diego, because Goldberg Sensei would be teaching the 90-minute class. I miss those lately, because he usually teaches the 90-minute class on Wednesdays (my date night). These longer classes are often more seminar-like in temperament, really going into depth on some aspect of Aikido as a practice, as opposed to techniques. It was a truly inspired class, a ...More Read More
Views: 1126


In General The Bridge Seminar 2012, Day 1 Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #142 New 01-13-2012 01:43 AM
For the third year running, I am participating in the Aikido Bridge Friendship Seminar in San Diego, with Doran Sensei, Ikeda Sensei, Tissier Sensei, and 6 guest instructors. (sandiego.aikidobridge.com)

Today, Thursday, was the first of five days, and just ran from 6-8 p.m., but I'm exhausted, so this is going to be quick. :-) I'm taking vacation time (Thursday-Monday) for the seminar, so I had the whole day free. Naturally I filled it with all kinds of fun. Here's how it went:
  • Set the alarm for oh-dark-hundred.
  • Hit snooze about 6 times.
  • Jump out of bed, soak food for the donkeys, eat.
  • Feed donks.
  • Shower, grab my stuff, and head to my home dojo (Aikido of San Diego).
  • Participate in a 90-minute conference call from the dojo (was there alone), so that I could be there on time to train with Jean, who has her 5th kyu exam coming up next week.
  • Train with Jean for an hour.
  • Participate in the the first session of our new 8-week Low Impact class, which was really a nice experience.
  • Hang around and chat after class.
  • Mozy on home. Eat a banana and raw nuts on the way.
  • Have a 90-minute massage, in an attempt to un-spasm my left calf and hamstrings, which seem hell-bent on preventing me from practicing suwariwaza.
  • Have a hearty snack of nachos, grab a fresh gi, and run out the door.
  • Forget my phone. Oh well.
  • Get to the seminar with maybe 5 minutes to spare. Change, get on the mat, bow in.
  • Have a fantastic time training. Get a few things easily, and totally miss a
...More Read More
Views: 945


In General A Warp in the Fabric of Time Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #141 New 01-13-2012 01:04 AM
Between work, the holidays, the server being down for a bit, and training even more than usual, I've gotten the two versions of my blog out of sync. As it's nearly midnight, on the first evening of a 5-day seminar, I will resist the urge to fix that right this minute,

When I do fix it (in a few days, I promise) I'll date those posts as of the dates I originally posted them on GrabMyWrist.com, so the two match up. That means 3-4 new posts will appear before this one.

For the next few days, though, I'll be posting about the Aikido Bridge Friendship Seminar, happening now (Jan. 12-16, 2012) in San Diego.
Views: 574


In Learning Expectations, Failure, and Persistence Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #140 New 12-06-2011 09:13 AM
A friend from work shared a link today to this article: The Trouble with Bright Kids. It describes some research on the kind of positive, praising feedback we get when we succeed, and how that can influence our chances of success on future attempts. It's also interesting to read how girls/women and boys/men are affected differently.

It really rings true for me. Or hits a nerve. Or maybe it's both. I was one of the "high ability" kids (possessing an innate quality, as opposed to making a "strong effort"). I went through school accompanied by a litany of desperate admonishments by my teachers: "You're one of the brightest students in the class. You should be getting better grades." Mind you, no one in the school system did a thing to help me learn how to do that, they were just constantly disappointed in me.

It wasn't until college, when I took Cognitive Psychology, and Psychology of Learning & Perception, and put the principles into practice, that I figured out how to succeed in school. Went from Cs and Ds, and academic probation, to all As, on the Dean's List.

What I realized after reading the article, and thinking it over on the way to the dojo, was that the whole issue is skill-area dependent. Or at least it seems that way to me.

No one ever told me I was athletically gifted (in spite of being a very physical, coordinated kid). I was never on any teams, or competed at anything. And here I am being patient with myself, and sticking to it, learning Aikido in my l ...More Read More
Views: 908 | Comments: 2



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