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My Path Blog Tools Rating: Rate This Blog
Creation Date: 06-08-2009 01:55 PM
Linda Eskin
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My path to and through Aikido. Observations on Aikido, horses, & life, by a 51 y/o 1st kyu.

This same blog (with photos and a few additional trivial posts, but without comments) can be found at www.grabmywrist.com.

I train with Dave Goldberg Sensei, at Aikido of San Diego.
Blog Info
Status: Public
Entries: 211
Comments: 359
Views: 316,671

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In Spiritual Being seen, and seeing Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #101 New 10-20-2010 08:01 PM
There are many times when I am struck with gratitude for my teacher. Here is a man who has trained in Aikido for many years, who is a perceptual genius, and who has devoted himself to sharing the art with his students.

The physical experience of training with him is that of being enveloped - utterly controlled, and completely safe. The emotional sense is one of total freedom to try, fail, and learn, again completely safe, trusting.

That is not to say it's all sweetness and nice, painless, or comfortable. Sensei sees through pretense, to the heart of the matter, and is willing to be direct and honest. Sometimes a seemingly off-hand comment cuts deep. My initial reflexive reaction is to defensively discount it as a moment of temper or frustration perhaps, or simply something misperceived. "That's not so." "I am not like that." "He's wrong."

But it's probably true that more it stings, the more accurate it is, and the harder I've been trying to hide it.

I've learned to allow for the possibility, even in my initial denial (which I now recognize as automatic, and meaninless), that there may be some truth there. "What did I do, or how was I being, that created that perception?" Of course, there is no differentiation between how I am perceived and who I am really. There is no "real us" that the world never sees. There is only how we come across to others.

It's a privilege to work with someone who sees so clearly. No one has ever had such faith in me to be open to str ...More Read More
Views: 960 | Comments: 5


In Spiritual How am I limiting myself? Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #100 New 10-19-2010 01:32 AM
I have posted about past Aikido In Focus workshops. They are held at our dojo, and led by Dave Goldberg Sensei. Each (as the name suggests) focuses on one aspect of Aikido. I've done all that have been offered since joining the dojo, and each its own way has been life changing.

My first, just over a year ago, was called "Relax, It's Aikido." You can read about my experience of that workshop here. The work we did in that short morning session let me see there was a whole way of being I had unconsciously walled myself off from, and allowed me to regain access to that way of experiencing life.

So here we are with another workshop coming up this weekend. I signed up for it weeks ago. I'm looking forward to it in the way one might normally reserve for going skydiving, or doing a ropes course: Excited, nervous, hopeful, maybe a little scared, giddy... I try to balance this against the reality that this is just a 2-1/2 hour one-time thing, with one very human sensei leading it, and a varied handful of students. Who knows how it might go. I try to not get my hopes up about what could be accomplished in so short a time. But then my past experiences tell me that significant insights and changes are possible.

Here is the subject of this workshop:
In what ways am I getting in my own way?
How am I limiting myself?
What should I be "looking at" in my own practice?
Interesting. I don't feel frustrated or stuck. I haven't been on a plateau. I'm preparing for my upcoming 4th ...More Read More
Views: 836


In General A Mysterious Gift Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #99 New 08-24-2010 11:28 PM
Sometimes my brain seems like hard, dry ground. If too much information is poured onto it, a lot runs off, and down the gutter. More soaks in from a gentle rain than from a fire hose. Even so, it sometimes sits in pools for days before it settles into the soil. Eventually the ground softens, and some time later I begin to notice hints of green. Tiny leaves of knowledge, sprouting.

Sometimes bits of information are more like ping-pong balls, fired from all directions. I see them all, but can only grab so many before they bounce away. I might notice that several went off into a corner, and I can go and collect them later, but many more escape.

And then there are times like tonight, when something precious is gently offered. I accept it with both hands, not sure what it is, and hold it as tightly as I dare, for fear of dropping it. It seems fragile, and important. Rare. I turn it this way and that in the light, feel the roughness and smoothness of it, and listen for any sound. Perhaps if I sit quietly enough, and look into it long enough, I will understand its message.
Views: 837


In General Practicing Love Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #98 New 08-21-2010 11:16 AM
One of my horsey friends, Lisa Illichmann, posted this yesterday in a discussion thread about some ongoing hatefulness or other in the popular media. This is so well stated, and relates so well to Aikido training, that I asked her if I might share it here. (And she said that I may.)

"Anger, like any strong emotion, is addictive. We actually begin to enjoy the rush of anger (which really is only a form of fear), it makes us feel right - some injustice has been done to us - and this, of course, makes the others wrong.

Interestingly enough, the same is true with strong feelings of love. We can just as easily become addicted to the rush of love. And more interesting, both of these emotions can be trained, honed and perfected. All we need is conscious practice in order to go from fear to love. (Emphasis is on the word "conscious.")"


For me, the dojo is the place to practice. And make a little change. And practice. And fall back into familiar patterns, and see that, under the magnifying glass of Aikido. And practice some more. "…conscious practice in order to go from fear to love." So well put.

Frank Doran Sensei says simply, and to the point, "Practice kindness."

Dave Goldberg Sensei says, in his most recent blog post, "Love is the glue between Yin and Yang—Uke and Nage. If you let the glue set and harden you lose the qualities that make your Aikido compassionate. You will not be a protector of *both* Uke and Nage. Keep the glue alive and vibrant so that it will s ...More Read More
Views: 829


In General Meditation in the New Dojo Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #97 New 08-11-2010 09:13 AM
The same ocean breeze is here, warmed and softened as it made its way inland up nine miles of wide river valley, Still familiar, but stronger near these hills on the north side, it wanders in through the broad half-open door. The bright high note of two small bells invites us to settle deeply into sitting, breathing.

The river to our west flows in silence, but the distant freeway's roar could be a river's roar. Breathe. Spiraling fans above confuse and redirect the breeze. Inhale. The river-scented air expands our lungs and our awareness. We sit on what was fertile bottomland a hundred years ago. Exhale. Settle.

The breeze touches our necks and lightly strokes our hair, like a lonely ghost glad to find company. An empty tanker truck rumbles and bounces down the road. Inhale. Inspire. Inspiration. Breathing.

The soft mat and the hard floor and the fertile soil and the flowing river cradle us, sitting, eyes closed, in their open palms.

The mission's bell, still just a whisper here, sounds more urgent on this side of the valley. It calls the farmers in from their fields as it has for centuries, not knowing they are long gone, the farmers, and their fields too. Exhale, and let them go. We cultivate something else here now. Our work nourishes the spirit.

The two small bells guide us back as the mission's bell falls silent. The breeze remembers its direction and continues, through another door and up the valley.
Views: 1285 | Comments: 3


In Spiritual Rediscovering Joy Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #96 New 08-11-2010 12:25 AM
Amazed at the joy available in Aikido.
I mean, WTH?

Breathless, smiling-for-no-reason joy.
Joy for no reason.

Excited-to-get-up-in-the-morning joy.
Joy in everything.

Full of energy, comfortable in my body.
Embodied joy.

Settled mind, leaping heart, yearning.
Forgotten joy.

A song you loved and hear again.
Every word a friend.

New messages, new meanings, new joy.
Listening anew.

Fresh ears, fresh eyes, an open mind.
Fresh joy.

An open body in clear air. Connection.
Love in motion.
Views: 1029


In General Back to work Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #95 New 08-09-2010 09:46 AM
A few months ago I said I felt "Like Bread Dough," letting things settle in as a new 5th kyu. I decided to allow myself to spend some time just showing up and training. I have indeed been doing that, while mostly concentrating on other things - training my horse, getting some health questions answered, helping move the dojo, and doing my work and a few house projects. While some of those things are still ongoing, I've found that lack of focus on my Aikido rather unfulfilling, and now I'm eager to get back to work. Looking forward to class tonight!
Views: 818


In Spiritual A Tree in a Hurricane Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #94 New 05-26-2010 07:44 PM
I've had a bit of a scare recently. I will not be fine (who among us will be, really?), but I'm a lot better off than I feared.

The past week was difficult. I had just started outlining a twenty-year plan for my life and career from 47 to 67. I'd ordered a stack of interesting books, and made a list of mentors to talk to. There were things to learn, possibilities to investigate... Exciting stuff.

Then I stumbled onto what sounded like some very bad news during a routine physical. Suddenly the future didn't look like it was going to be much fun. I don't scare easily, but I've never been so afraid.

It was like being in a hurricane, struck by new information and realizations like 2x4s hurled in the wind. In that hurricane, Aikido was the deeply-rooted tree I was clinging to. Friday night's class (see my previous post about it) could not have come at a better time or been more perfect. (How does Sensei do that?) Everything I've learned about meditation, breathing, staying present, being in my body, moving in, keeping my center... It all came into play. On Monday, when I should have been up in the mountains training my horse, I arranged for him to be turned out to play, and went to the dojo instead. Clinging to my sturdy tree. Another two classes last night kept me grounded.

Today I got test results that added up to very good news. More tests ahead, and ongoing management. But I was already doing that.

Aikido is probably the best thing I could have been doing for ...More Read More
Views: 1259 | Comments: 1


In Off The Mat Aikido Good Ukemi and Life Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #93 New 05-22-2010 10:35 AM
Life lessons from last night's class, in which Sensei focused on good ukemi in freestyle:
  • Be present in your body.
  • Don't move, or take a fall, in anticipation of what you think is coming.
  • Feel what's actually happening.
  • Stay soft and responsive.
  • Spring back the moment the pressure is off.
  • Keep your integrity.
  • You have more power in the situation when you have a solid base.
  • Keep moving. Do something. Don't just stand there and wait for the attack to come.
  • By choosing how you invite the attack, you will be better able to deal with it.
  • If your balance is really taken, go with it. Make the new direction yours. Own it.
  • Keep your center, and be ready to respond to openings for reversals.

Important points to take to heart, in Aikido and in everything.

Along those same lines, via my friend William Cummings on Facebook yesterday:
"I am an old man and have known a great many troubles , but most of them never happened ."
- Mark Twain
Views: 1450 | Comments: 2


In General Like Bread Dough Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #92 New 05-19-2010 01:04 AM
I've really been enjoying training lately, even though I have been at the dojo somewhat less to make time to work with Rainy, my horse. I look forward to classes like a kid on Christmas morning. I'm having fun with Rainy, and we're progressing well, but I miss Aikido on the days I don't go.

The connections and similarities between Aikido and horsemanship go much deeper than I had expected. That will be the subject of my next column for "The Mirror" on AikiWeb, in June. I'm constantly making wonderful discoveries in that area, and hearing virtually the same words from my horsemanship teacher and Sensei. There have been a few jaw-dropping moments with each where all I could think was "did I really just hear them say that?"

For most of this spring, summer, and probably fall I am in a really wonderful place with respect to dojo life. I'm not close to testing (my next exam will be for 4th kyu), and I'm not advanced enough to mentor others. I don't have any seminars coming up. Nothing in particular is expected of me. I feel like bread dough that's been left in a warm, quiet place to rise. The ingredients are all there, and well mixed. There's nothing to do but let them expand and mature. Just train.

I can almost feel the synapses in my brain making new connections, as the discrete skills and pieces of information I've accumulated over the past year weave themselves together. Recently, after being off the mat for a few weeks with a minor muscle strain I felt like I'd bee ...More Read More
Views: 1216



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