Welcome to AikiWeb Aikido Information
AikiWeb: The Source for Aikido Information
AikiWeb's principal purpose is to serve the Internet community as a repository and dissemination point for aikido information.

Sections
home
aikido articles
columns

Discussions
forums
aikiblogs

Databases
dojo search
seminars
image gallery
supplies
links directory

Reviews
book reviews
video reviews
dvd reviews
equip. reviews

News
submit
archive

Miscellaneous
newsletter
rss feeds
polls
about

Follow us on



Home > AikiWeb Aikido
Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > AikiWeb AikiBlogs > LinTal's Blog

Hello and thank you for visiting AikiWeb, the world's most active online Aikido community! This site is home to over 22,000 aikido practitioners from around the world and covers a wide range of aikido topics including techniques, philosophy, history, humor, beginner issues, the marketplace, and more.

If you wish to join in the discussions or use the other advanced features available, you will need to register first. Registration is absolutely free and takes only a few minutes to complete so sign up today!

LinTal's Blog Blog Tools Rating: Rate This Blog
Creation Date: 07-14-2011 06:52 PM
LinTal
Offline
rss2
Aikido's a lot more than I first thought it would be.
Blog Info
Status: Public
Entries: 31
Comments: 52
Views: 49,659

In General Dancing with Goliath Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #6 New 07-22-2011 07:02 AM
I'm not exactly tiny, I'm not exactly a feather, but lately I've been pondering how, as a younger gal, I can twist aikido to my needs. I'm blessed with a dojo full of friendly, burly guys to practice on! A few thoughts from my headspace atm:


Common obstacles from opponents:
Strength
Weight
Length

My answer:
To combat strength, craft larger spirals. A tighter embrace, a broader swoop.
To combat weight, move deeper. Blend and crest together to utilise the force of gravity and momentum.
To combat length, pivot. Stretch. Hips make a great pulley. Their comfort zone lies much higher than yours, lower your center and your playing zone to maximise control.


Does this sound on the right track? Maybe I'll see something entirely different about it all in the next season.
Views: 738 | Comments: 3


RSS Feed 3 Responses to "Dancing with Goliath"
#3 07-23-2011 09:10 AM
Belt_Up Says:
When it's half a foot or more difference (my own wild estimate, there's probably a measurable ratio somewhere) it appears to have a glaringly obvious effect. I weigh about 2.5 to 3x what she does, yet she has no problem moving me, due to her centre being much lower (e.g. a hip check destabilises my leg). Stiffening my arm merely gives her a nice lever with which to move me. If I resist otherwise, she changes direction, using my resistance to move me into the technique.
#2 07-23-2011 06:39 AM
LinTal Says:
I know what you mean! I had the pleasure of watching at a gassuku about a week ago. The smallest person threw a mammoth enough to clear several meters! It was like the principles needed to be greatly emphasised. Is lack of height an advantage then? A further thought, could we view relative height as a weakness, an ad for ways by which uke can be overcome? Like other concepts this seems so counter-intuitive yet plausible at the same time, quite opposite to popular culture and common practice.
#1 07-22-2011 04:57 PM
Belt_Up Says:
Quote:
lower your center and your playing zone to maximise control.
One of my instructors, at 4'10 to my 6', is naturally low enough to put me off balance almost immediately when I grab her wrist. The initial movement for things like kotegaeshi, kokyu nage, kaiten nage etc is nearly enough to topple me as she moves. My choice is either bend at the waist or squat, if she takes things lower, and both end with me flat on the floor.
 




All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:54 AM.



vBulletin Copyright © 2000-2014 Jelsoft Enterprises Limited
----------
Copyright 1997-2014 AikiWeb and its Authors, All Rights Reserved.
----------
For questions and comments about this website:
Send E-mail
plainlaid-picaresque outchasing-protistan explicantia-altarage seaford-stellionate