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Go Back   AikiWeb Aikido Forums > AikiWeb AikiBlogs > The Eternal Student

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The Eternal Student Blog Tools Rate This Blog
Creation Date: 09-13-2006 01:08 PM
Eric Cook
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The ability to teach is a true test of one's ability to learn.
Blog Info
Status: Public
Entries: 1
Comments: 1
Views: 3,748

In General Intellectual Cravings Entry Tools Rate This Entry
  #1 New 09-13-2006 01:08 PM
Three hours a week is hardly enough, be it Aikido or Object-Oriented Software Development.

When I decide to take a class, I choose one that will not only keep my interest, but stimulate my mind too. I know I've found a good class when I actively pursue knowledge outside of the given curriculum. I know I've found a great class when I push myself to my limits just to uncover a few gems hidden between the lines. Aikido qualifies as a great class.

In my first class, I was awkward at best. Everything seemed so foreign to me and I found myself losing track of everything. I performed the techniques correctly about twice out of the several minutes I was given. I knew what to do, I could see it in my mind, but applying the technique was a completely different story. But instead of blowing them off and waiting for the next lesson, I studied them intensely in my room. First the footwork, then moving from my hips, moving with my center, extending ki, the arm motions. I disassembled everything, just like I would a computer program. Everything can be taken apart as a separate entity and studied, but together, they became much more than a sum of their individual capacities. I could start to see the ties between them, what made them work.

During my second class, we didn't work on those same techniques, but new ones I had obviously never seen before. But this time, everything flowed together much more smoothly. Instead of just repeating the movements, I carried them out with intention. There were a few mistakes, of course, but I was able to grasp the concepts of the technique as uke, which I was unable to do by myself.

Even though I was drained and sore by the end of class, I was ready to go again. I felt alive and aware, a feeling I have only rarely achieved. And damn it felt good.
Views: 801 | Comments: 1


RSS Feed 1 Responses to "Intellectual Cravings"
#1 09-18-2006 02:57 AM
RoyK Says:
It's funny to me that you compare software development and Aikido. But, whatever floats your Ki
 




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