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karim\\\
03-11-2006, 11:55 PM
is there any practices one can do at home to enhance his techniques?????????

Aiki x
03-12-2006, 02:51 AM
If you study Iwama style you can practice your weapons kata.

jss
03-12-2006, 04:32 AM
There's plenty!
Tai-sabaki (body movement): normal stepping, sliding step, knee walking, irimi, tenkan, irimi-tenkan, etc...
ikkyo undo, shiho giri (with or without bokken), shiho tsuki, the rowing exercise; basically all the aiki taiso exercises
And that's just the basic solo exercises.

Joep

ps.: If you don't know what some of those mean, just ask. ;)

SeiserL
03-12-2006, 10:36 AM
Tenkan, tenkan, tenkan.
Relax, breath, keep posture/alignment.

karim\\\
03-12-2006, 12:19 PM
There's plenty!
Tai-sabaki (body movement): normal stepping, sliding step, knee walking, irimi, tenkan, irimi-tenkan, etc...
ikkyo undo, shiho giri (with or without bokken), shiho tsuki, the rowing exercise; basically all the aiki taiso exercises
And that's just the basic solo exercises.

Joep

ps.: If you don't know what some of those mean, just ask. ;)
wow thnx man........well :rolleyes: idon't know what is the ikkyo undo, shiho giri, and the shihu tsuki , but i think i know the rowing exercises it's when u move ur upper body fowrward and ur arms pointing forwards then retuning backwards right what's it for any way??

Skribbles
03-12-2006, 12:26 PM
dunno maybe im wrong but couldnt you practice the teniques? just like the motions over and over? get them ingrained in yer head?

Aristeia
03-12-2006, 08:17 PM
Yep, I agree with Brian. I once asked my first instructor if we had and kata for solo practice like Karate. He responded that all kata were were techniques done without a partner strung together so there's nothing to prevent you doing that yourself. It helps you get your foot work down and work on your balance in motion. Great stuff.

koz
03-12-2006, 09:23 PM
dunno maybe im wrong but couldnt you practice the teniques? just like the motions over and over? get them ingrained in yer head?

Training without a partner is essentially a dead practice. All you are doing is ingraining a set of motions which will have no bearing on reality the moment you have a partner to train with. Their posture, movement and 'energy' dictate your response, not vice-versa.

Aikido is a live practice, you need to feel the relationship between yourself and uke. Every partner you train with is different, thus this 'relationship' changes from person to person, as it even does with the same person from one moment to the next.

Sorry if that's not very clear.

Aristeia
03-12-2006, 10:40 PM
yes and no. Training the basic forms can make you lighter on your feet, more able to keep your balance as you shift and turn. What that means is that when you come to train with a partner you are in better control of your body which = increased ability to move and blend with theirs.

koz
03-13-2006, 07:02 PM
yes and no. Training the basic forms can make you lighter on your feet, more able to keep your balance as you shift and turn. What that means is that when you come to train with a partner you are in better control of your body which = increased ability to move and blend with theirs.

I guess we're just going to have to agree to disagree.

The point I was trying to make, admittedly not very well, is that while you can train the body to move from A to B to C as per the basic form of a technique, most likely what will happen when training with a partner is that you will try to make them do the same. Because through repetition you have taught your body to move to these positions irrespective of the dynamic relationship between yourself and uke.

jss
03-14-2006, 04:55 AM
idon't know what is the ikkyo undo, shiho giri, and the shihu tsuki , but i think i know the rowing exercises it's when u move ur upper body fowrward and ur arms pointing forwards then retuning backwards right what's it for any way??
Doing exercises you do in you dojo is probably best. Your teacher thinks they are important and he can correct you when you do them in class. And yes, that's you rowing exercise you described.

Ikkyo undo: is doing the first movement of shomen uchi ikkyo omote by yourself. You stand in hanmi with your arms by your side, shift your weight forwards and raise your arms/hands to eye level, return to begin position. Think of it as the rowing exercise with a vertical direction added.
shiho giri: striking (shomen uchi) in the four directions, normally with a bokken, but without is fine as well
shiho tsuki: tsuki (a 'punch') in the four directions with a jo, haven't found a decent way to do it without jo, though

Nick Simpson
03-14-2006, 06:07 AM
Get a friend to come to class and then go over the techniques/exercises in your own time (if it's possible). I started with a good friend of mine (who has since quit training) and with the help of 'Total Aikido' by Shioda et al (whom we held in superstitious awe, after reading angry white pyjama's) which was our bible, we would refresh our minds on things that we had learnt in the previous class.

Yes, its possibly dangerous, yes we made mistakes without the supervision of an instructor, but, overall it was a very positive experiance that contributed greatly to me advancing in the very early stages of my training.

Lnr
03-14-2006, 06:24 AM
There is plenty of Aikido based Qi gong that you can do at home by yourself to improve your coordination and posture, and to really center your energy. it looks a bit more like tai chi than Aikido but it's really good to do. It really helped me anyway.

Lnr

Nick Pagnucco
03-14-2006, 10:02 AM
There is plenty of Aikido based Qi gong that you can do at home by yourself to improve your coordination and posture, and to really center your energy. it looks a bit more like tai chi than Aikido but it's really good to do. It really helped me anyway.

Lnr

There are?
Where can I find more information about these? I mean, I've been following all the Qi gong threads going around, but I didn't know stuff was actually done.

justinmaceachern
03-14-2006, 10:16 AM
Just a quick note, It never hurts to practice your ukemi where ever you are. i practice in my basement without any pads. The way i see it, if you can fall alright on cement then you can fall anywhere.
As for other techniques, shore you can practiceany of your techniques anytime. All you have to do is try to invisualize your opponets. I recomend the computer program aikido 3D, it is truly a great program.

ajbarron
03-14-2006, 10:25 AM
What can you practice alone. We do a good deal of weapons at Calgary Aikikai. which allow one to practice footwork and positioning while alone. Although we don't practice any "kata" ( by this is mean a set form or hand technique moves with an imaginary uke) we have had Sugawara Sensei visit us for a seminar where he introduced us to some of his ideas. (Taichi style Aikido 42 Forms) This web site might be of interest

http://www.santarosaaikido.com/sugawara.html

Nick Simpson
03-14-2006, 10:30 AM
All aikido techniques are Kata (paired though they may be) but it is of course possible to do it alone. Ukemi at home is also good training as long as you dont injure yourself. I used to roll in my living room on carpet over a wooden and concrete floor and flip in the back yard onto grass just fine. Be careful though :)

Lnr
03-16-2006, 11:58 AM
The set of movements i would do most regularly at the moment are called Hachidankan the eight silk brokade, I don't really know where to find out about them but i hope ou can track them down.

Lnr

Nick Simpson
03-17-2006, 09:19 AM
That doesnt make any sense Eleanor, where did YOU find out about them? Qi Gong in aikido sounds sus to me. Ki/Chi, yeah. Yoshinkan hiriki exercises, yeah. Ki society exercises, yeah. But this sounds a bit bizaare to me?

Mark Uttech
03-17-2006, 09:34 AM
Right effort is to get rid of everything extra. I didn't learn that until after more than 10 years of fiddling around with extra things. I wonder if that is why it is best to stick with just one thing for ten years first? Usually after ten years, the next step is to go another ten. The second ten is easier than the first. In gassho

Alex Megann
03-17-2006, 10:04 AM
The set of movements i would do most regularly at the moment are called Hachidankan the eight silk brokade, I don't really know where to find out about them but i hope ou can track them down.
Lnr

Kanetsuka Sensei used to teach the hachidankin as a preparation exercise. He learned it from Kanazawa Sensei of the Shotokan, whom he knew from University in Tokyo. Kanazawa Sensei in turn learned it from Yang Ming-Shi, a tai-chi teacher who is originally from China but lives in Japan. He wrote a book showing all eight of these exercises, called "Illustrated Tai- Chi Chuan for Health and Beauty". It's published by Bunka Publishing Bureau, Tokyo.

Alex

Nick Simpson
03-17-2006, 10:16 AM
Aha, that makes sense. So it's a Tai Chi/Qi Gong exercise that some people have incorporated into their arts, not an aikido exercise perse...

Dillon
03-17-2006, 10:43 AM
Yeah, the 8 silk broadcade (sp?) is pretty standard fare in Qigong that you find in a lot of Chinese systems.

Lnr
03-21-2006, 11:42 AM
Chill Nick, you needn't get all het up about it! it's just what i do and i said it was like tai chi anyway but i learned it as an aikido exercise so sorry if you don't like that i'll be sure to run everything by you in future before i try and help someone else... oh wait no i won't!

Lnr

Nick Simpson
03-21-2006, 11:53 AM
Pardon? Chill? Het up? Whos aggitated here? I was merely confused by hearing of a 'qi gong aikido exercise' when to my mind they are separate arts, thats all. Im not trying to push my definition of aikido on you, I was merely interested in where this exercise came from. As I imagined, it's from another art and some people incorporate it into their aikido training. The 'YOU' looks a little aggressive, I didnt mean it that way, I just meant were did you learn it from, because you didnt offer any explanation as to where information on this exercise could be found. I forget that Mark studies aikido too...

Lnr
03-21-2006, 12:12 PM
they're not exactly separate i don't think... not by my understanding but that's just a point of view. If you want to be pedantic about it (and i have a feeling you do) fine they are separate but there is huge overlap

Lnr

Nick Simpson
03-21-2006, 12:14 PM
Of course we all have a different point of view, thats what makes this such a wonderful varied world etc etc. Pedantic? This is my last regarding this...

Adman
03-21-2006, 03:44 PM
Training without a partner is essentially a dead practice. All you are doing is ingraining a set of motions which will have no bearing on reality the moment you have a partner to train with. Their posture, movement and 'energy' dictate your response, not vice-versaThen what about aiki taiso or hitori-waza? These are all training without a partner.
The point I was trying to make, admittedly not very well, is that while you can train the body to move from A to B to C as per the basic form of a technique, most likely what will happen when training with a partner is that you will try to make them do the same.Why would it be "most likely?" I for one don't try to make my partner do anything.Because through repetition you have taught your body to move to these positions irrespective of the dynamic relationship between yourself and uke.Or maybe one has taught their body to move to "these positions" without the burden or anxiety of training with a partner. Your statement certainly doesn't apply to me or many of the people I train with. You can learn to respect the dynamic relationship between yourself and uke when you get back in to the dojo to test your new understanding (or mis-understanding) of the movement.

You are definately the authority on wether or not this approach works best for you. However, you certainly can't disagree with how it works for somone else (well you can disagree, but it would essentially be useless).

thanks,
Adam

Adam Alexander
03-22-2006, 12:19 PM
Training without a partner is essentially a dead practice. All you are doing is ingraining a set of motions which will have no bearing on reality the moment you have a partner to train with. Their posture, movement and 'energy' dictate your response, not vice-versa.

K. Ueshiba recommends it in "Aikido: The Master Course." I believe that's the one-- it's like an electric blue color?

I'd suggest giving it some serious effort before shooting it down. I find it extremely beneficial.