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pcallen
02-28-2006, 03:13 PM
The true answer to those that know me is my big b...body, yeah that's the b word I was going for. :rolleyes:

The question of colored belts or no colored belts has been repeated ad nauseum, I'm sure, but I have noticed a big difference, even within a single organization, on when or if a brown belt is worn.

The different answers that I have recieved for my organization - ASU are:
1. sankyu - ikkyu

2. nikkyu - ikkyu

3. anyone teaching below the rank of shodan

4. No brown belt only white (kyu) and black (dan)

Is this true for other organizations as well? Please post organizations with your reply.

Phil Allen

Larry Feldman
02-28-2006, 03:19 PM
Only Black and White. Shin Budo Kai.

Karen Wolek
02-28-2006, 03:27 PM
White til Black. USAF-ER

Ron Tisdale
02-28-2006, 03:50 PM
Doshinkan dojo (IYAF)
9 kyu
colored belts
brown = sankyu to ikkyu

I think there are people who just wear white until shodan though.

Best,
Ron

Michael O'Brien
02-28-2006, 04:04 PM
White till Black.

Qatana
02-28-2006, 04:16 PM
My dojo has a different belt system than our Parent dojo, but its Brown for 2-1 kyu. My current belt is green, which "technically" doesn't exist in any other dojo/seminar I've ever visited.Sensei just feels that we all deserve a tangible acknowledgement of our progress. I have a couple of kohai who are way beyond me in technical ability but they test less often due to attendance.
if a school Does have a colored belt system and somebody decided they want to wear their white belt I feel it is a pretension of humility and I find this type of person extremely arrogant and inconsiderate in their partnering, in general.

Toothpaste
02-28-2006, 04:50 PM
At my dojo the order is white, yellow, orange, green, blue, purple, brown, black. As a personal preference, I would prefer my dojo's current system to anything else, mainly because it helps new people know who to turn to for help (with their technique, for example) and, also, I think it's a great source of motivation for children. :p

aikigirl10
02-28-2006, 04:57 PM
Ours is
1. starting out - whitebelt
2. 5th kyu (1st colored belt) - blue
3. 4th kyu - blue "2nd degree"
4. 3rd kyu - brown "3rd degree"
5. 2nd kyu - brown "2nd degree"
6. 1st kyu - brown "1st degree" , plus you start wearing a hakama
7. shodan- black
and so on

tarik
02-28-2006, 04:59 PM
if a school Does have a colored belt system and somebody decided they want to wear their white belt I feel it is a pretension of humility and I find this type of person extremely arrogant and inconsiderate in their partnering, in general.

That would be me, apparently, although I perceived my pretension of humility and arrogance as politeness.

Due to belonging to an independent dojo, my rank, though attained legitimately, is unregistered with anyone and the only proof of it is in mind and body.

I usually wore a white belt whenever visiting other dojo until I reached black, even though we wore various colors in my home dojo. Now I still carry a white belt and when it seems appropriate still ask at new dojo what I should wear before getting on the mat.

Regards,

Tarik

tarik
02-28-2006, 05:03 PM
The true answer to those that know me is my big b...body, yeah that's the b word I was going for. :rolleyes:

Funny.. I was going to say cotton when I saw your question.

My dojo has white for noh-kyu-5th kyu, blue for 4th and 3rd, and brown for 2nd and 1st. There's the occasional rebel who tries to wear white all the time.

Tarik

bkedelen
02-28-2006, 05:11 PM
ASU does not have written rules regarding brown belt to the best of my knowledge. I think that as far as ASU is concerned if your instructor presents you with a brown belt, wear it.

koz
02-28-2006, 05:18 PM
Where I trained originally: white until shodan, hakama at shodan.

When I went to Japan: white until shodan, hakama at ikkyu but only at the home dojo and not when training elsewhere.

Where I'm training now: White until sankyu, brown until shodan, hakama as soon as you can afford it.

As a personal feeling, I believe mudansha (if training elsewhere) should follow the general guidelines of the dojo they visit. If only their yudansha wear hakama, it's probably best that you don't etc.

tarik
02-28-2006, 05:20 PM
As a personal feeling, I believe mudansha (if training elsewhere) should follow the general guidelines of the dojo they visit. If only their yudansha wear hakama, it's probably best that you don't etc.

I think the best policy is always to ask what is permissible or expected. I've found that for short visits, people don't usually care what you wear, but it's always best to ask first.

Regards,

Tarik

James Kelly
02-28-2006, 05:38 PM
As a personal feeling, I believe mudansha (if training elsewhere) should follow the general guidelines of the dojo they visit. If only their yudansha wear hakama, it's probably best that you don't etc.
I've seen udansha kick visiting mudansha off the mat to remove their hakama in order to conform to the local standard. So the above is probably more than just good advice, it's sometimes the rules.

oh yeah, the two asu dojo i've studied at: white and black, hakama when the cho thinks you're ready (apocryphally when your ukemi is good enough that a half blind visiting sensei can see the skirt and call you for uke and not have to worry if you can take a fall).

nathansnow
02-28-2006, 07:40 PM
8th kyu = white
7th kyu = yellow
6th kyu = yellow
5th kyu = green
4th kyu = green
3rd kyu = brown
2nd kyu = brown
1st kyu = brown
Shodan = black

I think the colors are a good visual tool to know right away the ukemi ability of the uke.

Qatana
02-28-2006, 08:14 PM
Hey Tarik, its really hard to see what color your belt is under a hakama! Now I hafta remember to check next time I see you!

Dajo251
02-28-2006, 08:41 PM
A wise man once told me, it doesnt matter what color your belt is as long as it keeps your pants up

batemanb
03-01-2006, 02:38 AM
A wise man once told me, it doesnt matter what color your belt is as long as it keeps your pants up

That would be fine if the obi one wears with a keiko gi was actually designed to hold the pants up. I'll lay odds that there aren't too many people out there who could keep their pants up with one of these belts as worn during practice :D


In the Lancashire Aikikai here in the UK, it's white until black. I am also a member of the Aikikai in Japan where it's usually white until black, however, the club I belonged to in Tokyo have white until brown (2nd and 1st kyu), then black, even though they are an Aikikai club.

rgds

Bryan

PeterR
03-01-2006, 02:41 AM
What's in a belt.

Cloth, dye, sweat and millions upon millions of bacteria.

Michael Meister
03-01-2006, 03:49 AM
Funny.. I was going to say cotton when I saw your question.

Tarik

My first thought either. And quite appropriate for a piece of clothing.

We do have colored belts: red (unranked beginners), white, yellow, orange, green, blue, brown, black (shodan ;) )... and I've seen a number of 6. Dans wearing red/white striped belts under their hakamas.

Ron Tisdale
03-01-2006, 08:56 AM
if a school Does have a colored belt system and somebody decided they want to wear their white belt I feel it is a pretension of humility and I find this type of person extremely arrogant and inconsiderate in their partnering, in general.

Hmm, I haven't noticed that in the people I've seen doing it. They get on the mat and train like everyone else. There is also a custom in our dojo that if you've been off the mat for a while you wear a white belt (even if yudansha) until you feel up to snuff again. I wear a white belt when I train at Daito ryu seminars and some others...I also used to wear a white belt at our saturday morning basics class (the tradition there was mudansha all wear white, but I was fairly new to training at the hombu full time, and didn't want any misunderstandings to arise).

So no, I haven't noticed what you speak of.

Best,
Ron

SeiserL
03-01-2006, 09:08 AM
Cloth, thread, and sweat.
That's what's in a belt.

Robert Rumpf
03-01-2006, 09:23 AM
ASU does not have written rules regarding brown belt to the best of my knowledge. I think that as far as ASU is concerned if your instructor presents you with a brown belt, wear it.

As far as there being no written rules at the general level, you're probably right... but then again, there isn't much in the way of written rules that are consistently followed. There's the ASU handbook, but you wouldn't know that it exists from many people's inconsistency in etiquette, attitude, etc.

Every different ASU dojo that I have trained in has had a fixed, unspoken expectation for when (or if) you wear a brown belt and has expected me to adhere to that standard. Those rules have always been treated as though they are the rules for the whole federation too, oddly.

That can be difficult to digest - your old instructor gives you a brown belt and your new instructor in your own federation makes you take it off, or your old instructor gives you a white belt and your new instructor in your own federation makes you put on a brown.

Who care, its only a belt, right? Giving it up or taking it up shouldn't mean anything.

But it DOES mean something in the sense that your new instructor or new peers may perceive you as putting on airs, or as acting needlessly humble, or whatever when in reality it is just a difference in how you were raised and that you wish to honor your old instructor and their decisions. They may even choose to do something about it to rectify the perceived problem. Or even worse, those instructors or peers may be correct and you just are putting on airs or pretending to be humble. Who can say?

To be honest, I think the farther you get in martial arts, the notion of being so observant and judgmental of your peers from everything on how they dress to how they bow to the way they tie their belt needs to be taken with a gain of salt - not everyone was raised the same way, and "different" is only equal to "wrong" in Japanese.. :) Judging someone by their exterior is very dangerous, and often misleading.

I guess what I'm saying is that if someone shows up in a pink gi and a neon green belt, you should take them as seriously as anyone else and train with them. They may just not know any better...

A general suggestion: use a large amount of caution when switching dojos (even in your own organization), as first impressions of these types of things mean a lot and can affect the tone of the relationships between students and teachers and students and students for a long time to come.

This is a touchy subject, and I'm not trying to badmouth ASU or any of the dojos I've trained at. What I like about ASU is its internal flexibility - but flexibility can lead to confusion and misunderstanding, too. I think its a price worth paying.

I'm sure that anything said about ASU would also apply to other organizations that are similarly flexible.

Rob

Ron Tisdale
03-01-2006, 09:42 AM
A general suggestion: use a large amount of caution when switching dojos (even in your own organization), as first impressions of these types of things mean a lot and can affect the tone of the relationships between students and teachers and students and students for a long time to come.

While this is true, it should also be stressed that by having a bit of patience, and being willing to just train and learn as you go can make a difference. I am in a situation where I am now training at the hombu as opposed to the branch dojo I was ranked to yudansha in. I made (and still make some) a lot of 'mistakes' as far as ettiquite and procedure are concerned. But once people realize that you are there to stay, and not carrying an attitude about the way you used to do things, as opposed to how you do things now, people really do cut you a lot of slack as you catch up. Being open about the fact that you came up in a branch dojo and don't know everything goes a long way too. Just train hard, listen, and learn.

Best,
Ron

Nick Simpson
03-01-2006, 11:34 AM
White until black, hakama at first kyu (if you get it awarded to you). The kyu grades do have a colour attached to them, we just dont wear a coloured belt :)

James Davis
03-01-2006, 11:36 AM
White until black, hakama at first kyu (if you get it awarded to you). The kyu grades do have a colour attached to them, we just dont wear a coloured belt :)
Same with us, except anyone can wear hakama.

Michael Zartman
03-01-2006, 12:38 PM
In the late 1970's, at my ASU dojo, the understanding was white until black and then white again (if you were Doshu), and hakama when you could take a high breakfall with ease (usually 3rd kyu). In the late 1980's, at my Aikikai dojo, the understanding was white until black, except if you were specifically asked by the sensei to wear brown only for teaching before shodan rank--hakamas for yudansha (or brown while teaching). In the late 1990's, at my ASU dojo, the understanding was white until black--hakamas were worn by anyone who wanted to do so, all yudansha did. Now, in the mid 2000's, my independent dojo uses colored belts, but permits white until black if preferred by the student. Most of us are (relatively) older, including our sensei, and we do not usually wear hakamas (unless there are special guests) because we get too hot and sweaty and tend to trip and fall with brittle bones--one of our students is a coroner, and we are afraid to give him any business. Actually, our aikido classes are mixed with judo techniques and the hakamas just get in the way of the pain.

Robert Rumpf
03-01-2006, 12:57 PM
While this is true, it should also be stressed that by having a bit of patience, and being willing to just train and learn as you go can make a difference. I am in a situation where I am now training at the hombu as opposed to the branch dojo I was ranked to yudansha in. I made (and still make some) a lot of 'mistakes' as far as ettiquite and procedure are concerned. But once people realize that you are there to stay, and not carrying an attitude about the way you used to do things, as opposed to how you do things now, people really do cut you a lot of slack as you catch up. Being open about the fact that you came up in a branch dojo and don't know everything goes a long way too. Just train hard, listen, and learn.

Its amazing how much other people having a positive perception of your attitude helps in terms of them being flexible to your needs and differences. Or how true the converse is, if they perceive you as having a bad attitude.

Sometimes, that perception is even related to what your attitude actually is with respect to this issue, and not just a reflection of their perception of your personality in general.. :)

Berney Fulcher
03-01-2006, 01:04 PM
We're white until Nikkyu, the Nikkyu, Ikkyu brown. No Hakama until black belt.

hakama when the cho thinks you're ready (apocryphally when your ukemi is good enough that a half blind visiting sensei can see the skirt and call you for uke and not have to worry if you can take a fall).

I remember having a visiting ASU dojo in house and doing a technique with a breakfall in it. I thought I had killed the hakama wearer. After class I mentioned to sensei that "that black belt couldn't fall that well", and getting the response "what black belt?". Assumptions get you every time :p

Dajo251
03-01-2006, 03:41 PM
That would be fine if the obi one wears with a keiko gi was actually designed to hold the pants up. I'll lay odds that there aren't too many people out there who could keep their pants up with one of these belts as worn during practice :D


In the Lancashire Aikikai here in the UK, it's white until black. I am also a member of the Aikikai in Japan where it's usually white until black, however, the club I belonged to in Tokyo have white until brown (2nd and 1st kyu), then black, even though they are an Aikikai club.

rgds

Bryan
I was just trying to make a joke ;-p

batemanb
03-01-2006, 03:47 PM
I was just trying to make a joke ;-p

so was I ;) :D

Dajo251
03-01-2006, 04:06 PM
I know I just couldnt figure out how to add the smileys into the post it self....damn my untech savvey ness

Dajo251
03-01-2006, 04:07 PM
I came from a school that didnt used a colored belt until shodan, my current school has colored belts, and I really have no idea what color I should be at 6th kyu but I will stick with my white belt that is fine by me

Mark Uttech
03-02-2006, 04:12 PM
at 6th kyu, you can safely hide with a white belt

Dajo251
03-02-2006, 05:36 PM
I have no qualms with it...infact I'd be perfectly happy with it until I hit shodan.

Mark Freeman
03-02-2006, 06:36 PM
I know I just couldnt figure out how to add the smileys into the post it self....damn my untech savvey ness

Just hit the 'go advanced' button and voila loads of smilies at your disposal. :cool:

Dajo251
03-02-2006, 07:19 PM
thankya

justinmaceachern
03-03-2006, 01:46 PM
There is nothing in a belt. It is just there to hold up your pants. "Dereck Gaudet" I think people get to involved with what it is a person is wearing around his\her waist.
Fear not the belt, but the one whoi earned it.

bratzo_barrena
03-03-2006, 02:47 PM
For what I've seen different associations/dojos have different ideas about the use of belt/hakama: white till black, different colors for different grades, hakama when shodan, anyone can use hakama, and so on.
What they all have in common is testing to 'earn' a degree.
I really don't agree with this testing. I don't consider that a one-day test can be used to evaluate your skills/improvement in Aikido. I think every class is a test and you just learn.
I specially don't agree with the testing system with the fact that almost no one ever fails the test, so you can see shodan, nidan, sandan, or higher degrees don't don't know what they do, and have less knowledge than a kyu grade (not all, but to many). But they passed the test... :freaky:
I even find ridiculous that a teacher that watches his students all the time, all the classes, and–if he/she is a good teacher– trains as uke and tori with them, needs one special day to see their students improvement.
Or this situation is worst, the sensei who comes once in a while, and who only watches the test and judges from watching. It doesn't matter how big a sensei one is, you can't judge just by looking.
Would be different if this sensei who comes once in a while trains with a person and then judges him or her. Then he/she can properly evaluate the student, but not from sitting in one corner and just looking at an exam.

So belts, degrees means nothing. What you do is what counts.
Now that I teach, I see three 'levels' (to call it some way):
1 you're just a student. (wearing white belt, because you have to wear something)
2 you're a student who teaches (at least one class), under the supervision of the "main" teacher of the dojo.
(wearing black belt and hakama)
3 You're ready to open your own dojo. (keep the black belt and hakama if you like. it's your dojo now. You make the rules)


I see my students every class, train with them every class (as uke and tori) and evaluate them every class. I won't need a special TEST/EXAM to see how are they doing. I'll see how they progress in every class.
When I consider he/she has achieved some advanced level, I'll ask him/her to teach at least one class in my dojo under my supervision. At that moment I'll also ask him/her to wear a black belt and a hakama. Once I consider he/she doesn't need my supervision to teach anymore, I'll let him/her know that under my judgment he/she is ready to open her own dojo.

Now in all these 3 'levels' you're always learning, even when you have your own dojo, you can learn from your students, from other instructors, from other students, from other arts. You never stop learning.

That's just my opinion

Bratzo Barrena
Instructor
Aikido Goshin Dojo
Doral FL

Michael O'Brien
03-03-2006, 03:58 PM
What they all have in common is testing to 'earn' a degree.
I really don't agree with this testing. I don't consider that a one-day test can be used to evaluate your skills/improvement in Aikido. I think every class is a test and you just learn.
I specially don't agree with the testing system with the fact that almost no one ever fails the test

So according to this policy we should stop all testing then, correct?

No need to ever test students in school because the teachers see the students every day and know their improvement, right? When they feel the student is ready they just tell them "Pack your bags and go to the next grade".

Testing allows teachers to see how students perform under a more stressful, on the spot, type of enviroment. Testing allows the teacher to evaluate how well a student has truly learned a technique by requiring the student to do something the student may not have had to perform in quite a while. Testing allows a teacher to evaluate how well a student truly understands and comprehends a technique by asking the student to perform the technique in a non-typical manner.

Testing has it faults and it isn't a perfect system by any means. Should it be abolished, not in my opinion.

bratzo_barrena
03-03-2006, 04:03 PM
MIKE,
and I respect your opinion.
Mine is just different.
Bratzo

Shoshin
03-03-2006, 05:01 PM
White til Black. Centro de Difusión del Aikido de Argentina . Under YAMADA Yoshimitsu Shihan

Michael O'Brien
03-06-2006, 05:12 PM
MIKE,
and I respect your opinion.
Mine is just different.
Bratzo

Bratzo,
Being able to agree to disagree and go on with life as friends is what helps us all grow and learn.

If we were all identical life would become boring quickly.

giriasis
03-06-2006, 08:29 PM
As far as what a belt means, it means what you want it to. As far as testing is concerned my sensei has found it very useful as a motivational tool for students to show up and train and while pursuing their goal of their next grade he always sees an improvement in their skill and abilities. At the same time rank isn't overly emphasized in our dojo - white until black and no lining up according to rank. I think the only time we do something by order of rank is when we practice jiyuwaza and that's only to determine who should go first and so someone junior can watch the seniors before it's their turn.

Also, what I've noticed the real "test" is sensei watching us getting ready to test, especially starting at the higher kyus and up. He only puts us up to test when he determines we are ready. The "test" is all the preparation we put into it, not the 5-10 minutes in front of Yamada Sensei or the 30-40 minutes for 1st kyu. Also, the thing is we have demonstrate our abilities in that short of a period of time. You don't have time to think about what to do. And I have seen people get failed.

Ron Tisdale
03-07-2006, 07:57 AM
And I have seen people get failed.

Me too. Actually, I failed a test myself.

Best,
Ron

bratzo_barrena
03-07-2006, 10:01 AM
Just to clarify,
I wrote, and quote: "...almost no one ever fails the test,..."
I didn't say that everyone ALWAYS passes the test. So I have also seen a few people fail their tests, but the problem is that MOST people that pass the test are not ready, and don't have the technical skill to pass. At least from my point of view, which could be wrong for other people, but is my opinion.
This situation is even more troublesome from shodan up, where you see so may people not ready (technically, understanding of principles, madurity, etc..) to be a shodan or higher, but they pass the test anyway; thus so many high ranks with poor technique.
Also, I didn't say students should not be evaluated. I said evaluation is a process that begins on the first day of training. Every class, every technique should be an evaluation. Instructors should train with their students, as uke and tori, and evaluate his/her progress in every moment.
So if after, for example, 4 years of constant evaluation, in which the instructor have seen in every class the progress of a student, Why would it be necessary a 20-minutes, 30-minutes, or 1-hour test? You've evaluated him/her for 4 years, why would you need a test? I think you should already know what level/degree/rank (whatever you wanna call it) he/she is in.
Now the idea that a test puts 'pressure' on the student, and he/she needs to work under that 'pressure'. Which is true, but I think is a 'meaningless kind of pressure', just to show that you can comply with some 'requierements', but is not the kind of 'pressure' that is going to make you a better martial artist.
I think training, not with the goal of achieving a belt, or passing a test, or having a rank, just training to be better, wiithout expecting other kind of reward but the fact of improving your technique, and the fact taht some day you'll be ready to share what you have learned with others, that makes you a better martial artist.
But that's just my opinion.

Bratzo Barrena
Instructor
Aikido Goshin Dojo
Doral, FL

James Davis
03-07-2006, 12:27 PM
I think training, not with the goal of achieving a belt, or passing a test, or having a rank, just training to be better, wiithout expecting other kind of reward but the fact of improving your technique, and the fact taht some day you'll be ready to share what you have learned with others, that makes you a better martial artist.
But that's just my opinion.


Mine, too. :)

justinmaceachern
03-07-2006, 12:51 PM
Ok guys a couple of things i dont agree with here. For one I dont think it is up to the instructor to advance aperson soley to keep them interested. What i mean is, an instructor is to pass on knowledge to a nother. It isnt his job to run around and say are you still interested, what could i do to make you more interested? A person is only going to be interested if they want. In the end it will always be the person showing interest. We should't put to much faith in a belt. We keep talking about belts the way western society does. Remember over seas you are still just a beginner at black belt. they dont put too much thought into what is a belt, and we shouldnt either. You should just be there to train.

Nick Simpson
03-07-2006, 01:58 PM
to be a shodan or higher, but they pass the test anyway; thus so many high ranks with poor technique.

Shodans a relatively lowly rank isnt it? Beggining and all that?

Chris Li
03-07-2006, 02:21 PM
Ok guys a couple of things i dont agree with here. For one I dont think it is up to the instructor to advance aperson soley to keep them interested. What i mean is, an instructor is to pass on knowledge to a nother. It isnt his job to run around and say are you still interested, what could i do to make you more interested? A person is only going to be interested if they want. In the end it will always be the person showing interest. We should't put to much faith in a belt. We keep talking about belts the way western society does. Remember over seas you are still just a beginner at black belt. they dont put too much thought into what is a belt, and we shouldnt either. You should just be there to train.

Just "being there to train" is a nice ideal, but how many people can do that right off the bat? My guess would be very few adults, and almost none of the children.

When my daughter went to public elementary school in Japan they awarded the children kyu ranks in the swimming classes. A big part of the rationale was to keep the children interested. Another part was to make a daunting task seem less formidable by breaking it down into bite sized chunks. They seemed to make both goals work pretty well, from what I could see.

Best,

Chris

bratzo_barrena
03-07-2006, 02:38 PM
Shodans a relatively lowly rank isnt it? Beggining and all that?

Ok, If you ask me what I a shodan means for me, well means nothing. I don't believe in ranks/degrees/belts or whatever one wants to call it. though I respect any association/dojo that uses this systems and respect their grades. I just don't agree with that methodology.
Now Shodan is considered in most association (as far as I know) a 'begining level', which means having the basic knowledge of principle, movements, techiniques, and so on, so you can 'really' begin to learn. But a lot of shodans or higher ranks don't even have this basic knowledge to be shodan. But they passed the test anyway. That's a big problem.

Quote: "Shodans a relatively lowly rank";
If what you mean by this statement, is that it's ok that shodans don't have proper basic knowledge or should just be consider closer to a beginner, then what's the point of being a shodan if you are as good or bad as any other lower level?
If you're gonna use a ranking system then each rank must mean and reflect something, that's common sense. But saying that because shodans are low rank anyway, and use that affirmation to justify that one should not expect much from them, is sutpid.

What's the meaning of using a ranking system and then say ranks doesn't mean anything? That's nonesence.

If one consider ranks don't mean anything, then don't use the rank system. if one consider ranks means something, then each rank must show and reflect what they mean.

Just a thought

Bratzo Barrena
instructor
Aikido Goshin Dojo
Doral, FL

daverun
03-07-2006, 05:32 PM
If one consider ranks don't mean anything, then don't use the rank system. if one consider ranks means something, then each rank must show and reflect what they mean.



Very well put. In the Chudokai Yoshinkan style of Aikido, the style which I train under, at the Retsushinkan Dojo, we use a the color belt ranking system as follows:

8th kyu - white (this is the starting belt)
7th kyu - gold
6th kyu - orange
5th kyu - green
4th kyu - blue
3rd kyu - purple
2nd kyu - brown
1st kyu - red
Shodan and up - black with Hakama (only black belt wear Hakama)

Even in our organization this may change from dojo to dojo, but it stays basically the same. As for the meaning for the belts it is to let others know where you are in your training, not for you really, but that is not to say it does not give some encouragement and a sense of accomplishment. As for becoming shodan, all that means in our organization is that you know and understand the basics of the techniques and you are ready to start learning the more advanced aspects of the techniques and Aikido itself. Shodan, in my opinion, is a big steping stone on your life long journey down the path of enlightenment, but it is just one of many steping stones that make up that path.

Masakatsu Agatsu - True Victory is Victory Over Oneself

Dave

justinmaceachern
03-08-2006, 08:50 AM
Your absolutly right Chris. You should just be there to train. Stop worrying about your rank or the rank of the guy next to you. I train in bjj and i told the sensei that i wasnt interested in moving up the ranks i just wanted to know a little bit about ground fighting in case i ever find my self in a situation where I need some of those skills. Plus it is an exellent workout.

justinmaceachern
03-08-2006, 08:55 AM
Hi dave, In goshin Aikido we have
7th kyu white
6th kyu yellow
5th kyu orange
4th kyu green
3rd kyu blue
2nd kyu brown
1st kyu recomended
Shodan.
I think it is pretty interesting to see the sifference in ranking systems

daverun
03-08-2006, 02:16 PM
I think it is pretty interesting to see the sifference in ranking systems

i agree it is very interesting, but like you said in your preveous post, it really doesn't matter, just as long as you train, the art (whatever art it may be, and i'm not just talking MAs, i.e. the art of writeing, or the art of math, ect.) the training is for yourself, not others; once again just as long as you train.

-dave

Nick Simpson
03-08-2006, 02:23 PM
Im sure I've said it before, but your always gonna find people of certain grades that dont live upto/deserve that grade in your opinion. Tough. It's got nothing to do with you, if you dont like it, dont take it out on them, go tell their sensei that you think he was wrong in grading them when they are obviously incompetant...

I admit that it is frustrating/annoying/disheartening to see *insert whichever grade here* be not upto scratch but at the end of the day, the only thing that matters is that you are happy with what you are doing and who you are doing it with. God I've mellowed.

Ron Tisdale
03-08-2006, 02:33 PM
Hi Nick. Strongly agree. If you have a problem, talk directly to the person who gave the rank. In my opinion, the rank represents the relationship between student and teacher as much as all the other things.

Best,
Ron

MaryKaye
03-08-2006, 03:07 PM
It's also worth noting that if an instructor gives someone a particular rank a bit too soon--and everyone makes mistakes--they can sigh and plan for a long gap before giving the next rank. In the long term, it won't have made much difference.

Mary Kaye

Nick Simpson
03-08-2006, 07:49 PM
It's also worth noting that if an instructor gives someone a particular rank a bit too soon--and everyone makes mistakes--they can sigh and plan for a long gap before giving the next rank. In the long term, it won't have made much difference.

Word. Hi Ron, Im right again, surprise huh? ;)

giriasis
03-08-2006, 08:00 PM
If you choose to make an issue that something really is nothing then maybe that nothing really is something.