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white rose
02-09-2006, 04:53 AM
Another thread which you lot have being over so many times, but here we go.

At the moment I am not training for my next grading. I have been told by my Sensei that I need to look as if Iam doing nothing when I am training, this will help me when I start to train for it.

All I have to say at this point in time is HELP :confused:

eyrie
02-09-2006, 05:48 AM
I think he/she means motion approaching stillness. Better yet, ask your Sensei what he/she means... ;)

white rose
02-09-2006, 05:54 AM
Cheers for that. I know what he means, I just can't do it and was wondering if someone had some magic way of being able to do it. :cool:

SeiserL
02-09-2006, 09:39 AM
All I have to say at this point in time is HELP :confused:
Stay relaxed.

Mark Freeman
02-09-2006, 12:06 PM
Cheers for that. I know what he means, I just can't do it and was wondering if someone had some magic way of being able to do it. :cool:

There is no magic! :( as Lynn said, stay relaxed. your sensei has given you a paradox 'do nothing' truth is often in the seemingly impossible.

regards
Mark

Steve Morabito
02-09-2006, 12:30 PM
I just got through C.M. Shifflett's book, "Ki in Aikido: A Sampler of Ki Excercises" and on page 90, there is an excercise in doing nothing. Basically in the excercise you are letting your arm completely do nothing while a partner supports it and/or lifts it and/or lets it go. There is an interesting quote from Koichi Tohei there which reads, "Do nothing! Doing nothing is not the same as 'not doing anything'" Anyway, the excercise is in the "Keep Weight Underside" section of the book and follows the "Relax Completely" section. It might be helpful to check it out. See reviews of the book in Aikiweb's "book reviews" section.
Steve

eyrie
02-09-2006, 04:27 PM
The hardest thing, I think, is "letting go" of the notion of actually doing something, i.e. performing a technique. Staying relaxed allows you to better lead and follow your partner. But ultimately, you will need something in the way of ki and kokyu ability to actually do something without doing anything, especially if uke is not being "co-operative". ;)

nathansnow
02-09-2006, 08:26 PM
Suggestion only.... try to act bored or totally disinterested while doing the technique. I have a picture in my head of a little kid that is being told to do something that he doesn't want to do at all. He mopes around with limp arms not paying attention to the task at all,trying to complete it without using one ounce of energy!!
I also had a senior student tell me that when he finds himself trying too hard, he watches the clock while doing the technique. It's kind of wierd, but it can get you out of your own way!

good luck!!

eyrie
02-09-2006, 08:41 PM
I think the idea is to "connect" yourself and "connect" with uke. Watching the clock sounds too much like "dis-connecting", or dis-embodying one's self, which at some level you do - i.e. watching yourself from the outside. Maybe that's not what is meant?

Nick Simpson
02-10-2006, 08:32 AM
Good advice here. Do what you tell me. Look bored. Like uke is beneath you trying to put them down and just go through the mechanics.

Ron Tisdale
02-10-2006, 09:17 AM
I tend to agree with you Ignatius...the saying is "the mind leads the ki"...if your mind is not engaged, it will change the results. Negatively, in my opinion.

Best,
Ron

I think the idea is to "connect" yourself and "connect" with uke. Watching the clock sounds too much like "dis-connecting", or dis-embodying one's self, which at some level you do - i.e. watching yourself from the outside. Maybe that's not what is meant?

NagaBaba
02-11-2006, 11:51 AM
All I have to say at this point in time is HELP :confused:
I'd suggest to change a dojo as fast as possible.It looks not healthy at all.

Robert Rumpf
02-11-2006, 12:14 PM
Ask yourself this question about every motion in your technique - "is this motion really necessary? is this amount of force or torque really necessary?" A lot of times people add more to a technique than it really needs.

Learning to do more with less is essential for randori.

Rob

Edwin Neal
02-11-2006, 12:27 PM
"Look bored. Like uke is beneath you trying to put them down and just go through the mechanics."

Brilliant!!! maybe an attacker will lose interest and go away... no intention... therefore no aikido or effectiveness...

http://www.aikiweb.com/columns/cclark/2004_05.html

Nick Simpson
02-11-2006, 01:10 PM
;)

I wish you were my sensei Edwin.

Edwin Neal
02-11-2006, 01:12 PM
Granted... ready for your lesson?

Nick Simpson
02-11-2006, 01:20 PM
Next time im in North Carolina, after visiting Jacksonville, Your dojo will be my next stop!

Edwin Neal
02-11-2006, 01:22 PM
don't worry i work the cyber dojo just as well...

Nick Simpson
02-12-2006, 07:19 AM
Thanks, but no. Sorry, but cyber is just a little freaky for me. Theres no substitute for the real deal. Like I said, If Im ever around NC and you are in a dojo by that time, then I'll call by to train ;)

Nick Simpson
02-12-2006, 08:01 AM
Also, I would have liked to add this yesterday, but this PC is sometimes crippled with pop ups :p

There is a difference between looking bored and being bored. It is deception, it is a tactic. It does not mean that one lacks intention, or that one can not be effective. It is merely a psychological tool. If someone was attacking you, it would not be wise to look scared (if you could possibly help it) and it would not be wise to let your attacker see your intent. Someone who appears completely unrattled and unbothered is by far the more formiddable opponent. Your mileage may vary...

Edwin Neal
02-12-2006, 12:32 PM
so instead of worrying about whether you look bored or not, focus on doing the waza technically correct...

eyrie
02-12-2006, 05:05 PM
Or better yet, forget waza entirely and focus on being connected with uke...

Lyle Bogin
02-12-2006, 06:52 PM
Sounds like "chill out" to me.

Aristeia
02-12-2006, 09:02 PM
relax harder!

Edwin Neal
02-12-2006, 09:14 PM
if you do the waza correctly then you must be connected to uke...

Mark Freeman
02-13-2006, 06:28 AM
if you do the waza correctly, you wouldn't need to ask for help.

Nick Simpson
02-13-2006, 07:15 AM
'Sounds like "chill out" to me'

Thats about it basically, technique can be correct but you can still use too much effort to perform said technique. Its about getting maximum effect for minimum energy expended.

James Davis
02-13-2006, 11:51 AM
Behave as if you're being attacked by kids. Throwing them a beating would be the wrong thing to do, so just do what you need to do to make tecnique work. Only use the force that's required. ;) Treat it kind of like play.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot; HAVE FUN!! :D

Nick Simpson
02-13-2006, 05:13 PM
'HAVE FUN!!'

Now that is excellent advice! James can I also just say that I have appreciated your sig for quite a while now. great stuff :)

James Davis
02-14-2006, 11:23 AM
James can I also just say that I have appreciated your sig for quite a while now. great stuff :)
Thanks Nick. I'm sure you're aware that Winston Churchill hit some people with some real witty stuff in his day. ;)

white rose
02-14-2006, 12:40 PM
Cheers I think.

I can tell people to chill out and look bored but for some reason for me it doesn't work. As for changing Dojo, NEVER I'am proud to by part of it (even if a little crap at the mo). My Sensei just say's less is more. It a cool saying I think, but hard to do.

Well I guess the only thing to do is train and train some more.

Mark if your ever in Sunderland or fancy a trip over, please feel free to come and teach us. We're a very friendly lot. (well apart from Nick that is, Oh yes and Tim and Keith and Colin, but I'am lovely)

Lyle Bogin
02-14-2006, 04:36 PM
I also think it may have something to do with taking a posture that doesn't look so "martial artsy". You know, the old kung-fu stance with gazing eyes and all that...sitting too low in the legs...tightening the muscles of the face...pointing with your fingers...whatever.

I once had a kung fu master (Li Peng) say to me "your movements look like you are doing them for someone else. do them for yourself." Good advice.