PDA

View Full Version : Losing my religion


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


aikigirl10
11-12-2005, 08:46 PM
Hello.

As i've stated in a couple other threads in the past, i am catholic. And for a while i was very devoted to my religion. I went to church almost every sunday, i got confirmed last year, and i attended my classes on a regular basis.

However recently (in the past 4-5 months) i feel like im really pulling myself away from God. This is not what i want at all. I want to be like i was. I want to learn how to love God again, and i want to learn how to be devoted again. I dont know what happened to me.

I still pray every night, but it seems like my heart isnt in it like it used to be. And every time i try to sit down and tell myself what i want and that i need to change its like my mind wants to go back but my heart doesnt. Honestly its starting to scare me.

Please give me some words of advice, preferrably from other catholics and christians who wont try to "convert" to me into being a protestant. In other words, what i need is encouragement and advice, not criticism. I think i've criticized myself enough already.

Thank you.

malsmith
11-12-2005, 09:20 PM
i dont know if this is the right thing to say, but maybe this is just a phase... i mean as long as you are still praying and you want to really be like you used to be... then maybe in a few weeks or months you will be like you used to be.

even though it may feel like your forcing yourself to pray and stuff right now, as long as you keep on doing it maybe it will feel right again.

i geuss what im really getting at is dont give up.

something that my mom always tells me to do to love God is to think of five different blessings every day.

aikigirl10
11-12-2005, 09:28 PM
haha... seems like not too long ago i was giving you advice about religion... ( i hope that was you if not im gonna feel really stupid)...such irony...

But, I hope you're right , i hope it is just a phase. I really dont want to lose God.

Thanks for the advice i will try the blessing thing... except i think i'll write them down.

malsmith
11-12-2005, 10:17 PM
yeah i think you did give me advice about religion, but i think i already lost mine, its like im pushing myself away from God more and more every day and nothing seems to bring me back, well maybe one day itll come back to me, but now it seems like religion is more of a hastle to me than a help.
but i know for some people religion means everything, so it could be worth holding on to.

Dave Himrich
11-12-2005, 11:07 PM
I inferred from your post and see from your profile that you are a quite young person. It's normal I think for people to wonder about religious ideas and to struggle with what role religion will have in their lives. Keep doing what you're doing and try not to worry very much. In a few years, your worries will look much different than they look now.

bogglefreak20
11-13-2005, 05:47 AM
To me, also, it seems that you've come to a time in your life where you question the platform you have been riding-on up until now. That only shows that you're growing up to be a person that really thinks with her own head. Good on you!

I believe scepsis is a normal and mostly very benefitial for anyone trying to get to the bottom of things. As Decartes said: "Dubito, ergo cogito. Cogito, ergo sum." (I doubt, therefore I think. I think, therefore I am.)

I owe you a word or two about my personal standing point, so you'llbe able to better understand where im coming from. Credo in unum Deum, patrem omnipotentem... I believe in God, one and only, creator of all things, living or dead. But I do not percieve myself as a member of any particular Church. Simply because all of them, to me, seem to have too narrow boundaries. What I'm trying to say is this - even if I don't go to mass but nonetheless try to live by rules that can be seen as god-pleasing, then I believe God is present in my soul also.

And if you perhaps someday feel that leading your spiritual life as you have until now no longer satisfies you and that you need to find your own path - do so without hesitating. You have a mind of your own, you certainly have a sense of responsibility - it shows through your posts - and IMHO it is much more important to do things in a way so that your conscience is at peace rather than to do things in a certain way just so that people around you won't say anything bad about you.

Te fear you might be experiencing is quite normal everytime we start exploring the world on our own. The once so firm and solid ground we stood upon is now shaking, making us uncomfortable but also urging us to set up a new platform - our own.

All the best to you and remember, Jesus was born into a mostly Jewish society. He was certainly seen by most to be a "religious outlaw", someone who in the eyes of his fellow-men decided to walk his own way, in many ways contradictory to the well-founded and settled traditions. Should we now blame him for taking the path less trodden?

Mark Uttech
11-13-2005, 06:50 AM
You asked for advice from other catholics: Since we are ever on a journey, we never return to "how we once were." Instead, we are ever where everything is becoming new. Sometimes it is dark and we have a long way to go. I used to attend Mass every chance I got, it was always wonderful to share the peace. Now, sharing the peace is something to practice everywhere. One way to do it, is by simply bowing. Mindful bowing is acknowledging the presence of something greater than ourselves, and there is no end to it.

In Gassho

Kevin Leavitt
11-13-2005, 07:48 AM
I am not a Catholic, but who is asking you to make a decision or choice today? I understand you are young, and looking for answers! We all are! Don't be in too big of a hurry to look for them, you might get yourself steered in the wrong direction.

Take your time and be easy on yourself.

Also, do you not feel comfortable talking to your priest, parents, etc?

Looking for advice from strictly Catholics says to me that you are only looking to validate that what you are being told to believe is correct. I don't think that will ultimately help you as it will not be your own decision.

Certainly it is good to talk to others that have been through similar issues though!

I know it is difficult sometimes to understand, but it is a journey that sometimes you must take alone and it may take a while.

Again, don't be so quick to find answers, it may take a long time. You should not be in a hurry. It is good, IMHO that you are aware and conscious about this! Celebrate it, don't feel guilty!

I'd personally start by talking to those that you are closest too, and to those in your church.

Others most definitely offer good advice here!

aikigirl10
11-13-2005, 08:00 AM
Of course i have thought about talking to my priest and i probably will if the situation doesnt get any better. I dont think i'd really feel comfortable talking to my parents. Honestly i dont think either of them are spiritually "in tune" if that makes any sense. My dad just forces me to go to church so that he wont look bad, and my mom doesnt even go to church anymore so... oh well.

I just figured i'd post on here and see what kind of answers i dug up before going to confession and talking with my priest.

Kevin Leavitt
11-13-2005, 08:10 AM
I know exactly where you are with your parents on this. I have been there as well. Good luck, you are miles ahead of this at your age and your understanding of this than I was at your age!

aikigirl10
11-13-2005, 08:12 AM
Looking for advice from strictly Catholics says to me that you are only looking to validate that what you are being told to believe is correct. I don't think that will ultimately help you as it will not be your own decision.


If you look back at the original post i said Catholics and other christians. The reason i would like to hear from Catholics is because they know exactly what my religion is so they might have experience close to mine or whatever. It wasnt so that i could validate my beliefs.

Personally, I dont think any one man has the answers. I dont think any certain church has all the answers. We can only believe to the best of our knowledge, and catholicism is really all i've ever been taught.

As far as it not being my own decision.... it will definitely be my own decision. I make all of my own decisions based on my own beliefs, and im not passive. But encouragement helps, hearing from people who have been there helps. And that was why i started this thread.

Best,
-Paige

aikigirl10
11-13-2005, 08:16 AM
I know exactly where you are with your parents on this. I have been there as well. Good luck, you are miles ahead of this at your age and your understanding of this than I was at your age!


:) Well hey its good to know im not the only one

Dirk Hanss
11-13-2005, 09:30 AM
Hi Paige,

doubts are a sign of getting grown-up. Those who never doubt, will never be adult. They just look and sound as if.

Definitely your believes will neve be the same as before. You will see that what the little girl has been told, or what she understood from what she has been told, was totally wrong, at least partly. So what is the truth the? You'll never know and recognising that all those good christians and even the priests are just human beings with all their mistakes and prejudice, etc. will not help. You have to find your own religion as you will have to find your own aikido.

The good news is that you have no chance to lose God. You might lose your faith. You have lost its for a while. But your words show that you will get it back again, even if somewhat different than bee before.

I understand, That you do not want to talk to your parents about your problem. Naybe you can talk to your father about simple details.

Always visiting the same church could get somewhat boring. Maybe your father allows you to visit other catholic churches in your surroundings. It could give you good inspiration. And you can talk to some other young people, although it might be dificult to find some you can talk about religion.

I am not chatholic, but I recall a good advice from an eldery catholic in a discussion a few years ago: " may those guys in Rome do what they want. We don't care. We just stay catholic!"

So being different from other catholics and even disagree somewhat with official clerical proclamations does not mean anything. You can stay with God.

May God bless you


Dirk

Julian Straub
11-13-2005, 11:28 AM
Paige,

I agree with the general sentiment of the responders of this thread, being that there is a "natural-ness" (that may not be a word) to going through times of spiritual crisis (or absence, for that matter).

I know that your parents are "forcing" you to go to church, and that isn't working for you right now. I can tell you as someone raised Catholic that I believe that parents that make church attendance regular for their children are doing so out of a genuine interest for the child's spiritual welfare. The issue here, I think, is that you feel that your relationship with God isn't what you'd like it to be.

So what can you do about it? God is a spirit being, and can only be reached through prayer from the heart. Church liturgy is a template to pray and to worship, but it (like very other form) is completely meaningless if there is not a deep, absolutely personal relationship. I am glad that you are sticking with it with regards to prayer, and I think that's good. You may be being tested by God at this stage of your life, and that's ok, and that's normal, and you seem to be doing fine. You might consider reading some devotional works like John Donne's"Holy Sonnets", the works of St. Theresa of Avila, or St. John of the Cross's "Dark Night of the Soul". These are Catholics or Catholic-born (in the case of Donne) that have gone through what you are going through, and the poems and writings that they have created are so beautiful and deeply inspiring.

Faith is by definition cannot be dependent on your circumstances around you, on what you see with your eyes. It may require you to go for month, even years, before you come out of it. But on the other side of doubt, and of unknowing, is what can be called "the blessed hope", which is strengthened by your trial. Faith is something that requires a lifetime of work. If you feel that you lack faith, pray to God and ask Him to strengthen your faith, to solve your unbelief, for He is the only one who can. Do that, and you will be happy with the outcome, I promise you.

Regards,

SeiserL
11-13-2005, 01:27 PM
IMHO, many people have to lose their religion to gain their spirituality. You may not feel closer to your religion, but you can feel closer to your God. After a time of inquiry, we tend to be stronger.

aikigirl10
11-13-2005, 04:46 PM
Paige,

I agree with the general sentiment of the responders of this thread, being that there is a "natural-ness" (that may not be a word) to going through times of spiritual crisis (or absence, for that matter).

I know that your parents are "forcing" you to go to church, and that isn't working for you right now. I can tell you as someone raised Catholic that I believe that parents that make church attendance regular for their children are doing so out of a genuine interest for the child's spiritual welfare. The issue here, I think, is that you feel that your relationship with God isn't what you'd like it to be.

So what can you do about it? God is a spirit being, and can only be reached through prayer from the heart. Church liturgy is a template to pray and to worship, but it (like very other form) is completely meaningless if there is not a deep, absolutely personal relationship. I am glad that you are sticking with it with regards to prayer, and I think that's good. You may be being tested by God at this stage of your life, and that's ok, and that's normal, and you seem to be doing fine. You might consider reading some devotional works like John Donne's"Holy Sonnets", the works of St. Theresa of Avila, or St. John of the Cross's "Dark Night of the Soul". These are Catholics or Catholic-born (in the case of Donne) that have gone through what you are going through, and the poems and writings that they have created are so beautiful and deeply inspiring.

Faith is by definition cannot be dependent on your circumstances around you, on what you see with your eyes. It may require you to go for month, even years, before you come out of it. But on the other side of doubt, and of unknowing, is what can be called "the blessed hope", which is strengthened by your trial. Faith is something that requires a lifetime of work. If you feel that you lack faith, pray to God and ask Him to strengthen your faith, to solve your unbelief, for He is the only one who can. Do that, and you will be happy with the outcome, I promise you.

Regards,

Thank you. I really enjoyed this post.

God bless

mathewjgano
11-14-2005, 12:07 AM
I do not believe in evangelism, so anything which may sound as such is simply poor phrasing on my part. These are simply my thoughts which i hope serve a good purpose.
A psychologist named Karen Horney ("hor-nay") articulated a concept called the "tyranny of the should". All of us have ideas about what we should do or shouldn't do and sometimes they get in the way of simply living and learning from our lives. If, in your heart, you don't feel as compelled to pray, ask yourself why. You're the only person who can answer these kinds of questions. Are you drifting from God or from the Catholic conception of God, or is your mind simply focusing on something different for the time being? It's easy to become distracted and time seems to have a knack for throwing distractions our way...or so it seems to me. Questions like these were valuable to me when I began to feel a distance from what I hold to be most sacred. I think ultimately what matters most is one's sincerity. If you remain sincere in everything you do, I think matters of spirituality answer themselves over time. Look to your heart for guidance. For me, I often have to prevent myself from thinking too much about things. When I simply focus on doing my best, be it physically or spiritually (usually both at the same time, in my case) I find the "knots" of confusion undo themselves and a deeper understanding of myself often occurs. Gambatte.
Take care,
Matthew

James Davis
11-14-2005, 11:50 AM
Hey, Paige.

I joined the Catholic church a couple years ago at the age of 27, having been raised a baptist. My wife (girlfriend at the time) was catholic, and I initially went to church with her because I had not been to a church of any kind for a few years. I'd had some negative experiences with some judgemental people, and had been turned off to religion for some time. The people that I met at my current church are some of the most wonderful people I've ever known. I feel a much greater sense of community with this parish than in any place prior.
When my wife was in college, she too had some doubts as to the existence of God and the way she'd been living her life. On a backpacking trip through europe ( :) cool, I know) she encountered all sorts of good people and saw a great many beautiful things that God created. While on this huge hike, my wife came to a conclusion that reinforced her faith and a few years later brought mine back to life.
The epiphany that my wife had concerned the existence of love. Science can explain why animals protect their young or why they congregate with others to better protects themselves; it's about survival. What about love? Theoretically, our race could exist without love. We could have been made to function on instinct, like the animals. Why do we love? On some levels, it doesn't make sense to us at times. People that are not necessarily good for us or have ideas completely opposite to our own, often still have our love. For all of the problems it causes us, love is still a good thing. When I think about how best to do God's will, I think to love other people. Laugh with 'em, cry with 'em, comiserate about how much homework stinks with 'em...

If you haven't already, maybe you could join a youth group. Try volunteering to help people in your community. God wants more from you than the bare minimum. ;)

Try talking to God about it. Whenever you're having a problem with any other friend of yours, the best thing is to talk about it with them, right? Just like any other friend, God likes to hear from you whether your day has been great or cruddy.

Man, what a long post! Sorry about the rambling; I hope it helps. :)

LadyLailah
11-15-2005, 05:42 AM
This is a topic that people would have many different views and opinions on

The only advice I would give, is to follow your heart. Only you can know what's right for you

:)

Matt Molloy
11-15-2005, 06:28 AM
This is a topic that people would have many different views and opinions on

The only advice I would give, is to follow your heart. Only you can know what's right for you

:)

Seconded totally. :D

Cheers,

Matt.

Chuck.Gordon
11-15-2005, 07:45 AM
Paige,

Question everything. Critically examine your reasons for wanting to abandon your church as well as the reasons you think you shouldn't. To some people, losing religion is a freeing experience, to others it's unthinkable.

Any religion that cannot (or will not) withstand critical scrutiny and doubt is not a religion worth practicing anyway, IMNSHO.

Mary Eastland
11-15-2005, 08:55 AM
IMHO, many people have to lose their religion to gain their spirituality. You may not feel closer to your religion, but you can feel closer to your God. After a time of inquiry, we tend to be stronger.

A big amen to that :)
Mary

Julian Straub
11-15-2005, 12:25 PM
I wonder if some of the people on this list, the ones who are seem so eager to dispense with and ignore the good points to religious institutions, and "faithfully" adhere to the modernist, neo-gnostic mentality that they have it within themselves to attain some kind of nondescript "spirituality"; those who "blaze their own path" because they somehow know better than anyone else; whether they have the same attitude towards their aikido/budo sensei.

If true, it would explain a lot of some of the budo I've seen out there.

mazmonsters
11-15-2005, 12:55 PM
Paige,
I know exactly where you are coming from. I remember going through all of those emotions and feelings, doubts and fears. I can only say that we do not live by emotions or feelings, as these can be mis-leading. Just because something feels good, doesn't necessarily make it a "good thing." Our faith is not based on feelings, but a belief held in God through His Son, Christ Jesus. All man made rules are just that, man-made. Look in the Bible for yourself, and read with faith. And Faith is a gift from God, given to you, Paige. He loves you so very much. No evil you do can make Him love you less, and no good you do can make Him love you more. Your life is in His hands, and He is working all things in you for His glory. This is a phase, and a necessary one. His love for you is eternal...if it weren't, would He have come down to take on our fleshly "costume" and willingly hang on a cross for us? The answer is no.
In His love,
Matthew

aikigirl10
11-15-2005, 02:50 PM
Try talking to God about it. Whenever you're having a problem with any other friend of yours, the best thing is to talk about it with them, right? Just like any other friend, God likes to hear from you whether your day has been great or cruddy.

:)

Wow... what a great way to put that. I never thought about it like this.

Thanks

aikigirl10
11-15-2005, 02:52 PM
Paige,
I know exactly where you are coming from. I remember going through all of those emotions and feelings, doubts and fears. I can only say that we do not live by emotions or feelings, as these can be mis-leading. Just because something feels good, doesn't necessarily make it a "good thing." Our faith is not based on feelings, but a belief held in God through His Son, Christ Jesus. All man made rules are just that, man-made. Look in the Bible for yourself, and read with faith. And Faith is a gift from God, given to you, Paige. He loves you so very much. No evil you do can make Him love you less, and no good you do can make Him love you more. Your life is in His hands, and He is working all things in you for His glory. This is a phase, and a necessary one. His love for you is eternal...if it weren't, would He have come down to take on our fleshly "costume" and willingly hang on a cross for us? The answer is no.
In His love,
Matthew

That made me tear up... hahaha :p
But it also made me feel better.
Such great advice im getting!

mathewjgano
11-15-2005, 09:08 PM
I wonder if some of the people on this list, the ones who are seem so eager to dispense with and ignore the good points to religious institutions
Do you think people on this list have implied religious institutions haven't many good points? I certainly hope I didn't come across that way at all. Whenever there are conversations about religion and spirituality I find both a strong desire to join in and a strong desire to remain quiet because on one hand the topic is centrally important to me. However on the other hand I never feel I adequately convey what ideas I have about them. After rereading my post one thought came to mind: I should have said one sentance: "Follow your heart." It seems the more I speak sometimes, the more I realize the less I should.

those who "blaze their own path" because they somehow know better than anyone else; whether they have the same attitude towards their aikido/budo sensei
This brings up an interesting thought, which is probably better suited to a thread all its own: how individualistic a nature is the study of aikido/budo?
Take care.
Sincerely,
Matthew

Kevin Leavitt
11-16-2005, 03:29 AM
I wonder if some of the people on this list, the ones who are seem so eager to dispense with and ignore the good points to religious institutions, and "faithfully" adhere to the modernist, neo-gnostic mentality that they have it within themselves to attain some kind of nondescript "spirituality"; those who "blaze their own path" because they somehow know better than anyone else; whether they have the same attitude towards their aikido/budo sensei.

If true, it would explain a lot of some of the budo I've seen out there.


I am probably one of the people you are referring to, at least I identify myself with this! :)

I think you bring up some very good points! And I have had these very thoughts years ago.

Here's the deal. For me at least dispensing of what I label "organized, western religion" was not an easy or over night process. That and you don't dispense of it! I thought you did, but it is not something that you can "turn off" or "repackage" nor do you really stand up one day and declare "I am no longer an Episcopalian!"

It took me many, many years to figure this out!

The fact remains, that I am a white, anglo saxon protestant by upbringing, culture, and paradigm, and nothing will ever change that! I will always be influenced by that.

I can choose not to go to church, and to no longer mentally identify and consider myself apart of that religiious community, but I cannot escape it 100%. This is important to realize and accept.

Next,

I think those that do choose the path that I have chosen realize better than anyone that the path you choose is personal in nature and that each person must make his/her own decision and it must be made carefully. I am always very cautious about offering advice in this area as what works for me, does not work for everyone. It is something that you must find on your own.

Do I have my opinions and beliefs about Catholicism? Certainly. Are the correct, for me they are, but that does not necessarily mean they are correct or should be transformed to others. This is a western mentality that says there is only one right and one wrong. It must be absolute for everyone! Not so! What is right for me is what is right for me!

I don't think anyone really blazes there own path. We have lessons learned, situations, history, and teacher that guide us. It isn't "ala carte" for us "spiritually liberated", we can't just "choose" what we want to out of convienence! You still must adhere to the universal laws that exist out there! (we might disagree on what they are, but they are there!).

What I interpret as "blazing your own path" is "thinking for yourself". Questioning, looking inward, introspection, making religion and spirituality your own practice.

I think the conflict for most comes into play as they look deeper and want to go beyond the rote actions of "checking the block" by simply attending mass, taking communion, and going to confession. They want a deeper, more personal relationship that they own!...this is blazing your own trail and thinking for yourself!

I really dislike the terms "modernist, neo-gnostic mentality ". it drums up all kinds of emotions and labels that people that usually are trying to be negative and cause separation between people.

What you call this, I call "nothing". Most people that you would label in this category follow very old practices such as Buddhism, Yoga, Taoism...etc. What is "new" about the practices is that simply they use them as tools to help them one their path.

It is those that are confined to simply the religous institutional "box" mentality that feel the need to label things in a nice neat way. Why confine yourself or limit yourself to only one way of self discovery? Unless you are insecure and feel threatened by exposing yourself and your beliefs to other experiences?

gotta run...maybe more later!

Thanks!

SeiserL
11-16-2005, 09:09 AM
I wonder if some of the people on this list, the ones who are seem so eager to dispense with and ignore the good points to religious institutions, and "faithfully" adhere to the modernist, neo-gnostic mentality that they have it within themselves to attain some kind of nondescript "spirituality"; those who "blaze their own path" because they somehow know better than anyone else; whether they have the same attitude towards their aikido/budo sensei.

If true, it would explain a lot of some of the budo I've seen out there.
Which people specifically?
Which religious institutions specifically?

IMHO, none of us "blaze" our own paths, know better than others, and we all follow those ways we respect and seem to work.

Leon Aman
11-30-2005, 04:13 AM
Hello.

As i've stated in a couple other threads in the past, i am catholic. And for a while i was very devoted to my religion. I went to church almost every sunday, i got confirmed last year, and i attended my classes on a regular basis.

However recently (in the past 4-5 months) i feel like im really pulling myself away from God. This is not what i want at all. I want to be like i was. I want to learn how to love God again, and i want to learn how to be devoted again. I dont know what happened to me.

I still pray every night, but it seems like my heart isnt in it like it used to be. And every time i try to sit down and tell myself what i want and that i need to change its like my mind wants to go back but my heart doesnt. Honestly its starting to scare me.

Please give me some words of advice, preferrably from other catholics and christians who wont try to "convert" to me into being a protestant. In other words, what i need is encouragement and advice, not criticism. I think i've criticized myself enough already.

Thank you.


(Losing my Religion a nice song by Gregorian)

Although you didn't elaborate the reason of consternation I still believe there is a reason behind it.

It is right for catholic people to supplicate an advise from a priest in a situation like yours. Sometimes they are able to provide solution but sometimes, not.

If for any reason you didn't get what you expect , thats okay . No condemnation, no recusancy or whatever. Anyway you can try making your own reconnaissance, without self criticsm or prejudism.

Just keep in mind Life goes forward not backward ... after all life is for living so just keep on going.


Leon

DH
12-03-2005, 07:53 AM
Paige

Fast and pray. He didn't go anywhere. Matters of faith are just that. It is my belief-and it has biblical precedent-that faith requires exercise.
Remember Jesus said , when talking to the disciples "There is so much I want to tell you but you are not ready to hear it. Paul said you are not yet ready for solid food-meaning certain people are still at an infant level compared to what? Others who are ...moving forward. Paul also talked about exercising the body and exercising the spirit. We can assume than there are levels of spiritual strength. Remember when we are talking about these matters we are talking about not just the physical plain- but the spiritual one. Who said "We do not battle men but the prince of the power of the air?"
So, that said, there are phases in our lives I have found where we move closer but then he pulls back a bit and we have to reach.
Pray on these things and read all the many references where Jesus noted different levels of faith, different strengths of faith. These are not just given freely-given yes, but there is growth. One of my favorite Biblical phrases is this.
"The kingdom of heaven suffers violence, and violent men take it by force." It is a profound and defining statement about who we are in him, yet where we are here. It has a pragmatic explanation for people of faith. What does it mean?
We are in a fallen world, there is a battle for our souls we assail and assault that realm-spiritually, with prayer, with fasting and prayer, and accomplish things of the spirit. A faith based life is like Yoga! wierd, I know, but wait. I mean it looks easy and peaceful on the outside but its very hard and very taxing and will require much of us.
I say... no matter what.... just hang in there for starters. Then fast and pray for periods. Just when ya think "I am just so dead inside." Wham! Glory… kiddo, Lovin arms.

Cheers
Dan

Chizikunbo
12-03-2005, 08:21 AM
Hello.

As i've stated in a couple other threads in the past, i am catholic. And for a while i was very devoted to my religion. I went to church almost every sunday, i got confirmed last year, and i attended my classes on a regular basis.

However recently (in the past 4-5 months) i feel like im really pulling myself away from God. This is not what i want at all. I want to be like i was. I want to learn how to love God again, and i want to learn how to be devoted again. I dont know what happened to me.

I still pray every night, but it seems like my heart isnt in it like it used to be. And every time i try to sit down and tell myself what i want and that i need to change its like my mind wants to go back but my heart doesnt. Honestly its starting to scare me.

Please give me some words of advice, preferrably from other catholics and christians who wont try to "convert" to me into being a protestant. In other words, what i need is encouragement and advice, not criticism. I think i've criticized myself enough already.

Thank you.
Hello friend,
I used to be catholic, and my family still is, except my mom who is a Jewhovahs Wittness (scary). I am spiritual but not belong to any really organised religion, recently I have been studying Oomoto Kyo however. But that is beside the point.

Pray, pray pray my friend, god will guide you. Ask for help and state your intentions rather than the standerdized prayers that are so common. For instance in Matthew when it was stated for followers of chrsit to pray in this manner, it was simply a model of christs prayer. You must open you mind and heart to god, and then follow what seems right.

You may not be like you were before but maybe better. Seek earnestly what feels right and all things will fall into place. Do all things with compassion, love, and respect in mind, and nothing bad will come of it.

Yours in :ai: :ki: ,
--Joshua Paszkiewicz

aikigirl10
12-03-2005, 09:10 AM
Hello friend,
I used to be catholic, and my family still is, except my mom who is a Jewhovahs Wittness (scary). I am spiritual but not belong to any really organised religion, recently I have been studying Oomoto Kyo however. But that is beside the point.

Pray, pray pray my friend, god will guide you. Ask for help and state your intentions rather than the standerdized prayers that are so common. For instance in Matthew when it was stated for followers of chrsit to pray in this manner, it was simply a model of christs prayer. You must open you mind and heart to god, and then follow what seems right.

You may not be like you were before but maybe better. Seek earnestly what feels right and all things will fall into place. Do all things with compassion, love, and respect in mind, and nothing bad will come of it.

Yours in :ai: :ki: ,
--Joshua Paszkiewicz

Thank you very much

Chizikunbo
12-03-2005, 09:16 AM
Thank you very much
Your very welcome my friend,
Yours in :ai: :ki: ,
--joshua

aikigirl10
12-03-2005, 12:40 PM
Paige,
I know exactly where you are coming from. I remember going through all of those emotions and feelings, doubts and fears. I can only say that we do not live by emotions or feelings, as these can be mis-leading. Just because something feels good, doesn't necessarily make it a "good thing." Our faith is not based on feelings, but a belief held in God through His Son, Christ Jesus. All man made rules are just that, man-made. Look in the Bible for yourself, and read with faith. And Faith is a gift from God, given to you, Paige. He loves you so very much. No evil you do can make Him love you less, and no good you do can make Him love you more. Your life is in His hands, and He is working all things in you for His glory. This is a phase, and a necessary one. His love for you is eternal...if it weren't, would He have come down to take on our fleshly "costume" and willingly hang on a cross for us? The answer is no.
In His love,
Matthew

I just wanted to say something about this post again.

Since this thread has sort of died... i've been kinda going in and out of faith. Right now i feel very faithful again and i plan on staying that way. But this post has really motivated me to stay in there and keep praying and keep trying. Everytime i was feeling upset or down about something i would get online and read this post... thats really how much better it made me feel. And the first time i commented about it i dont think i specified that enough.

Thank you Matthew... you seem like a great guy. PM me anytime u want and you'll be in my prayers.

-Paige :)

Lorien Lowe
12-04-2005, 10:55 PM
Remember that whatever you decide, however you end up, the beauty and awe and glory are always there - no matter what name you attach to them.

LK

Trish Greene
12-05-2005, 12:31 PM
Paige,

I haven't chimed in yet so here it goes!
As a Christian I have to remember that it is my relationship with the Lord that matters the most. Not my relationship with this type of church or that type of church. I am not catholic, but I am a Christian. I keep reminding myself that I follow Jesus, the Word that was given to us and what He stood for, unconditional Love.

James Davis
12-05-2005, 04:33 PM
I just wanted to say something about this post again.

Since this thread has sort of died... i've been kinda going in and out of faith. Right now i feel very faithful again and i plan on staying that way. But this post has really motivated me to stay in there and keep praying and keep trying. Everytime i was feeling upset or down about something i would get online and read this post... thats really how much better it made me feel. And the first time i commented about it i dont think i specified that enough.

Thank you Matthew... you seem like a great guy. PM me anytime u want and you'll be in my prayers.

-Paige :)
I'm glad you're doin' okay. I'd been wondering. Be good. :)

Mark Uttech
12-07-2005, 08:49 PM
One goes in and out of faith like the butterflies among the flowers, like the fireflies among the dark shadows.