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AikiSean!
10-19-2005, 06:34 PM
4 months back I took a new job, in meeting the people my martial arts inevitably came up. Turns out one of the guys I work with is very proficient in Wing Chung. It was refreshing for him not to ask "Hey what belt are you?" Right away I saw that to be a good sign. Me being curious on how to further my atemi and just generally know some nice basic strikes I picked his brain. Upon him finding out that I did aikido he immediatley expressed interest. SO we did the thing that any two people who love the arts would do. Get together and do some training and begin learning what we can. In trying to relate how he can use aikido through his WC we did sort of a sticky hands excersize where we tried to feel out basic wrist teachings. I thought this would be most bennefical to him, however I was very floored at what I picked up. In dojo training I'm use to some resistance but just enough so that the technique is not given to me. He however provided slightly more, so I found myself having to really rely on body movment more and more and really let go of strength vs strength. All and all, I have been learning a lot of great things to help round myself. I was just curious as to maybe some of you guys stories, good or bad in getting together with people from other arts.

Sonja2012
10-20-2005, 01:41 AM
You know, itīs funny, because I hear so much about people complaining about other budoka not taking aikido seriously or mocking it, but I have - when it comes to real life as opposed to budo forums on the net - never had that experience... :rolleyes: Your post just made me realize that.

I have met a few karateka, judoka and even a couple of people from Wing Tsun, who came in for beginnerīs classes and I found them all to be very respectful. What is more, they seemed to get what aikido or at least what the physical aikido techniques were all about and they seemed to really like it from the start. But I also had the impression that they took their own budo seriously as well - they were not the "I have done karate for 3 months and am an expert" kind of people. So they approached aikido the same way that they approach or respect their own budo. I have found these people great for the atmosphere in the beginnerīs classes, as they bring in a very good training attitude and excellent ettiquette.

Pauliina Lievonen
10-20-2005, 06:19 AM
ave done karate for 3 months and am an expert" kind of people. So they approached aikido the same way that they approach or respect their own budo. I have found these people great for the atmosphere in the beginnerīs classes, as they bring in a very good training attitude and excellent ettiquette.

Yeah, what Sonja said. We have some people in the dojo like this, some of my fave training partners.

I've been doing the drills that were discussed a while back, with a dojomate who also did wing chun for longer than I have done aikido. So far, I've been learning how not to get hit all the time, just some of the time. :D :freaky: Actually getting back at him isn't even on the program yet, lol.

I've also discovered that if I want to have a remote chance, I really need to get in better shape. I get out of breath aftr a minute or two, and get clobbered... :rolleyes:

kvaak
Pauliina

Sonja2012
10-21-2005, 02:03 AM
A friend of mine does WT and the other day we were talking about it, exchanging ideas, and he said how they align their hands, hips and feet so that they can pull power out of the earth and direct it towards the attacker. That reminded me of how much aikido has in common with other martial arts even if they seem to be very different, like WT. I always forget that.

Lorien Lowe
10-23-2005, 12:47 AM
There's a guy I train with who has a black belt in some form of karate; his rolls aren't spectacular, but other than that his ukemi is fabulous. The best word I can think of to describe him is 'slippery.' His punches don't just hang out in the air - one really has to blend, throw accurate atemi, and truly take his balance because he won't just give it up. He's also just a really nice guy. Definitely an asset to the dojo.

-LK

sullivanw
10-23-2005, 02:26 AM
This summer I visited an old friend who has been studying a form of kung-fu (can't remember what) for the past year or two. I watched a class and was invited to participate in some open mat time afterward. It was a wonderful experience as a small group of us compared and contrasted the two arts. I was very impressed with the connection and softness that one of the brown sashes displayed, and heard a few wows when showing (to the best of my ability) uchi kaiten nage. What was especially eye-opening was the wide variety of ways that these guys had for creating and taking advantage of openings, and not only through atemi. The whole time we kept saying stuff like, "Oh, that's a lot like what we do, but like this..." Truly fascinating.