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Eric LeCarde
10-17-2005, 05:40 PM
I was a bit curious what other styles people have trained in, and which ones seemed to compliment aikido well. I'm curious in exploring other forms while I train aikido.

aikigirl10
10-17-2005, 06:08 PM
I was a bit curious what other styles people have trained in,

I've trained in aikido for 71/2 yrs and i started shaolin kung fu about a year ago.

and which ones seemed to compliment aikido well.

Shaolin compliments aikido VERY well

I'm curious in exploring other forms while I train aikido.

If you want other "forms" shaolin is the thing for you (<< that sounded like a commercial lol) We do tons of animal forms and gajillions of weapon forms and competetive sparring (but u dont have to compete if u dont want to) here is a website , the curriculum is nearly endless.

www.centralshaolin.com

Eric LeCarde
10-17-2005, 06:12 PM
Sorry, I mean forms as in different styles =)

actually, there is a place near by that teaches wing chun and traditional shaolin (I think thats what they called it). Figure Its worth checking out.

aikigirl10
10-17-2005, 06:18 PM
I know what u meant , and shaolin is a very different style of martial art , it just happens to include alot of different forms

Rich Dyer
10-17-2005, 06:26 PM
Arts that would compliment aikido imho include boxing/bjj/judo.

Camille Lore
10-17-2005, 07:51 PM
I've found at my dojo that Kempo for blocking and striking is good to help you defend from an attack and set up for a technique. Jujutsu is good for one on one defense... aikijutsu is really cool!! The JJ and AikiJ are all in the same family of Aikido, so I think they go well together...

mathewjgano
10-17-2005, 08:00 PM
Sorry, I mean forms as in different styles =)

actually, there is a place near by that teaches wing chun and traditional shaolin (I think thats what they called it). Figure Its worth checking out.

I friend of mine studied wing chun a bit and liked it. From what I've seen it looked like the sticky hands drills and close-quarters nature of it were quite usefull and seemed like they might compliment Aikido pretty well. That's my impression at least.
Take care,
Matt

flashdragoon
10-17-2005, 11:27 PM
i am cross training skotokan karate with aikido and it seems to work deveoping the stability and control you can use in aikido, and the strikes and kicks are a plus as well

Devon Natario
10-18-2005, 01:06 AM
Muay Thai and Submission Wrestling seem to be a good combination with Aikido. I am just starting the Muay Thai and submission wrestling. Had I known how great these were, I would have taken these years ago.

Aikido for wrist techniques, submission wrestling for groundfighting, and Muay Thai for stand up. Talk about a great combo

stelios
10-18-2005, 02:11 AM
My previous teacher has been through a few different arts but admantly indicated towards Judo when asked similar questions.
I suppose that an Aikidoka would blend more easily with another martial art as long as there is sufficient flowing motion included.
From my experience, every single Karateka-boxer-kick-boxer-taekwondoka that visited our jojo and tried out aikido for alternative exercise had to quit very soon as they found that out flowing motion moves contradict what they had learned in the past (static defence/offence).
Shaolin kung-fu might be a nice alternative although as I have seen it in practise and I was not left everexcited.
If I had to look for something different I would go for Pagration (the ancient Greek combat martial art) although few teachers teach it nowadays.

Aristeia
10-18-2005, 03:02 AM
People have a wonderful capacity to see the similarities between what they are doing rather than the differences. So while I would say BJJ is a great compliment, I suspect whatever you decide to train in you will find a way to make fit in with aikido and think it's such a perfect match you can't see why everyone doesn't do it. :)

Also do a search on this subject as it's been discussed on Aikiweb many many times and there's a lot of good info there.

ad_adrian
10-18-2005, 04:19 AM
i did kung fu, praying mantis style and ican say that it has nothing to do with aikido unless your going to be judging it on very little things which really dont have much to do with it,
but anyhow ,
i personally, am a firm believer in studyin one art at a time...like a full martial art
you could probably contemplate gym with aikido that would only help strengthen the muscles or even kendo for swordsmanship, but i find aikido is the best of a long range of martial arts with a lot of history,
its derived from aikijujitsu and a number of other martial arts the founder did which all date back with history of the samurai, i just think stick to one martial art that works for you.

SeiserL
10-18-2005, 07:36 AM
I cross-train in FMA/JKD. Actually, I've been training in them over 20 years and Aikido only 11, so I guess Aikido (though now my principle study) is my cross-training. Also get as much Aiki-jujutsu as I can.

MikeE
10-18-2005, 07:51 AM
Coming up on 17 years of Aikido and do it exclusively... along with Batto Do.
Trained in Ryu-Te (ryukyu kempo) for 7 years and still I use the punching style and kyusho jutsu that Taika Oyata taught. It is atemi with a little more precision and flows easily.
6 years of BJJ under Rickson Gracie. I went up the ranks fairly quickly because it is just Aikido on the ground to me. Now, I use it to escape from the ground instead of looking to submit someone.
A smattering of Judo and Bujinkan.

I like to experience other arts, not necessarily to master them, but to understand their philosophy and what they are trying to accomplish, so I can make my Aikido defense more complete.

John Boswell
10-18-2005, 09:53 AM
Coming up on 17 years of Aikido and do it exclusively... along with Batto Do.
Trained in Ryu-Te (ryukyu kempo) for 7 years and still I use the punching style and kyusho jutsu that Taika Oyata taught. It is atemi with a little more precision and flows easily.
6 years of BJJ under Rickson Gracie. I went up the ranks fairly quickly because it is just Aikido on the ground to me. Now, I use it to escape from the ground instead of looking to submit someone.
A smattering of Judo and Bujinkan.

I like to experience other arts, not necessarily to master them, but to understand their philosophy and what they are trying to accomplish, so I can make my Aikido defense more complete.

Six years BJJ from Rickson Gracie? Yeow! Remind me not to ever make you mad, m'kay? ;) How did you enjoy the training? And how did you like the Bujinkan? I've always been curious about them as well.

djalley
10-18-2005, 10:07 AM
I used to train in Aikido and Tae Kwon Do simultaneously in college. I thought that they were diametrically opposed in mindset, technique, and pretty much every martial sense. To ME, this made them compliment each other well. What I was learning in one, I was not getting at all in the other. I just had to make sure I stayed focussed on what I was doing at the time, so I was learning Aikido in Aikido class and TKD in TKD class. I was kind of "pigeon-holing" each type of training, and integrating them together when I had a chance during private workouts with some folks from the club (which they were receptive to). Not everyone can do this, and I daresay I was not doing this as effectively as I might have, but that was my intentions.

I respect the opinions of the others on this list, but I'm not sure training in sister arts (such as Judo or Aiki-Ju-Jitsu ) would yield as much benefit to what you may be looking for, since you'll be learning much the same thing, just different ways of applying it. It would certainly specialize you as a grappling artist, but you may find you want more punch and kick knowledge.

Looking back, if it was available I'd consider a karate, probably kempo. Only one language to learn :) but ultimately, in my opinion, Aikido is best complimented by something completely different. I went for the striking arts to compliment, and am satisfied with the sense of well-roundedness I have taken from that experience. You should find for yourself what would compliment your training.

:ai: D

CNYMike
10-23-2005, 03:57 PM
I was a bit curious what other styles people have trained in .....

Right now, in addition to Aikido (which I returned to 1.5 years ago after a 16 year "break"), I am doing Shito-Ryu Karate, LaCoste Inosanto Kali, Pentjak Silat Serak, and a Vietnamese style of Tai Chi. I've also been exposed to Shotokan Karate and TKD and other Chinese forms from a Shotokan sensei in Maine; Western Boxing; European Fencing; Wing Chun Kung Fu; Seidokan Aikido (that's what I did 16 years ago); and I did Yang Style Tai Chi (I think) until about six months ago. I attended an Eric Paulson seminar once, and I've attended seminars in Jun Fan/JKD.


and which ones seemed to compliment aikido well .....

They all do in different ways, I suppose: Serak is 180 degrees from Aikido, intent on doing the maximum of damage to the opponent -- even lethally so -- whereas Aikido wants to resolve things as peacefully as possible. Definitely got a yin/yang thing going there. (Every other martial art falls in between those two extremes IMHO.) Kali is best described by one word: "More." It starts with the stick, true, but blossoms out to study every type of weapon you can imagine and every type of empty hand technique you can think of. It doesn't so much as compliment Aikido as enfold it.

Tai Chi, like Aikido, focuses on iternal aspects, but has empty hadn forms and is tied to the Chinese classics like the I-Ching.

The karate class I am in is pretty unique; my sensei is studying the kata and comping up with self-defense oriented bunkai, which heavily emphasizes joint locks and throws. So what he does is more influenced by Aikido and jujitsu as opposed to complimenting it.

I should add at this point that I didn't set out INTENDING to put together this training regime. Instead, I followed my nose over the years, initially from karate, and I did what I was interested in. Even when I dropped out of Aikido, I stayed interested enough that I always wanted to go back, and here I am again. Some people will lay out what arts you should train and for what attribute, but I think you should just do what interests you. The Chinese school you mentioned in another post sounds great; go for it! Respect your teachers and seniors, and all the arts you do, and you'll be fine.

HowardBurkham
10-24-2005, 11:30 AM
I studied Tae Kwon Do, Tang Soo Do, Hapkido, Shaolin Long Fist Kung-Fu, Goju-Ryu, and Yoshukai. I have just begun training/studying Aikido, and from what I've seen thus-far, I'd have to say that Goju-Ryu, Hapkido, and Yoshukai are very complimentary to Aikido.

UnholyFracas
10-26-2005, 02:54 AM
After about 6 years of Aikido I've recently started Iaido which has leant a sense of historical realism to Aikido (as in I can see more clearly where it comes from). The foot work is subtly different though so I get rather confused :) I'm also on the verge of taking up Kung Fu. I miss the striking aspect of Karate that I studied at College and Kung Fu has always fascinated me so we'll see how it goes...