PDA

View Full Version : Anything


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


~RIYO~
08-01-2005, 07:38 PM
I was wondering, when I'm sitting at home I wish I could go to my class.Too bad I can't.Can anyone tell me if there is anything I can do at home to practice my Aikido.Besides practicing with a weapon. :)

Mark Uttech
08-01-2005, 08:08 PM
practice with an invisible partner.

maikerus
08-01-2005, 08:39 PM
Sit in seiza while watching TV or reading a book or whatever. Make sure its a proper seiza and you'll get better at all sorts of things including balance and power.

Charles Hill
08-01-2005, 10:12 PM
Well, you could start a bunch of threads on Aikiweb. Oh wait, you already thought of that.:)

Charles " I get bored too" Hill

Sanshouaikikai
08-02-2005, 12:19 AM
Get a book on it and practice the techniques in the book...then again...that might not work too well if you're a beginner...and it also depends on what style of aikido the book teaches and what style you are learning in the dojo...see if your dojo has a manual or list of techniques or something so that you can practice them. Mine does...it's for studying for the belt tests. It costs $5 at my place though to get one. Anywho...I think that's a somewhat decent idea, no?

Dirk Hanss
08-02-2005, 02:16 AM
I was wondering, when I'm sitting at home I wish I could go to my class.Too bad I can't.Can anyone tell me if there is anything I can do at home to practice my Aikido.Besides practicing with a weapon. :)
You can stretch - but carefully.
You can do all the aiki warm-up, esp. wrist warming, stretching and strengthening.
You can do ukemi on the lawn or a mattress.
You can do all the tai sabaki, trying to move your hara as flat as possible.

And yes, improving seiza and shikko is good, too.

My family does not like me doing such things in the living room while we are watching tv. But it will help. Really doing techniques, without a partner helps learning the basic move and the names, but it is not much more than tai sabaki. To feel the atttacking power and to respond to it or blend with it, you need a real partner. Unfortunately my family is not willing to support me.


Dirk

DustinAcuff
08-03-2005, 02:12 PM
My best advice would probably be to just relax and not worry about it. Being soft and fluid are a big must here, so stress and tension are big no no's and doing a technique on your own then trying those reinforced bad habits on a partner is a sure way to cause stress. Do the seiza thing, stretch if you want to, practice correct footwork if you want to. But don't take this too seriously. My sensei is a big fan of using the saying "If you seek it you cannot find it" meaning that if you try to force something then it won't happen. I've found that when I plateau in my techniques taking a couple weeks off works some real wonders.

Bronson
08-03-2005, 10:30 PM
THIS (http://www.trainforstrength.com/workout1.shtml) comes highly recommended.

Bronson

NagaBaba
08-03-2005, 11:19 PM
extend your Ki!

Lyle Bogin
08-04-2005, 10:42 AM
Rest.

feck
08-04-2005, 12:45 PM
Meditate

markwalsh
08-04-2005, 01:25 PM
Search forums section for identical threads :)

Jeanne Shepard
08-04-2005, 11:32 PM
Practice randori with your imaginary friends.


Jeanne

Dirk Hanss
08-05-2005, 01:24 AM
Practice randori with your imaginary friends.

Please don't do that! If they are not used to and good in ukemi, they might leave.
Would be a pity,wouldn't it?

Dirk :)

oh sorry, this is not the humor section, but I couldn't hold.

Pdella
08-05-2005, 12:25 PM
When I first started Aikido, I was similarly frustrated by my inability to practice outside of class. But in my dojo, we work with bokken and jo from the beginning, so I did weapons work outside of class. I also worked on my breathing meditation by sitting in seiza and focusing on my breath.

I also read about Aikido and related topics. I would recommend: Sword & Brush by D. Lowry, The Way of Aikido by G. Leonard, Angry White Pyjamas by R. Twigger, and Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere by Westbrook and Ratti.

More recently, I've gotten a lot out of watching Aikido videos, both from my own lineage and other schools. This was only useful to me after I had already done the techniques I was watching repeatedly in the dojo. Then I had little revelations while watching them on video, e.g. "oh they do it like that," or "oh my hand should be there," etc.

.

Nick Simpson
08-05-2005, 05:42 PM
Dont get me wrong, i love aikido. But it always seems that everyone gets a little obsessed with it when they begin. I used to do a lot of weapons work at home and practise ukemi and read a lot of books etc etc. But now i just go to class and talk about it. Eventually your ukemi gets good enough that you dont need to do it at home etc etc.

guest89893
08-05-2005, 11:10 PM
I was wondering, when I'm sitting at home I wish I could go to my class.Too bad I can't.Can anyone tell me if there is anything I can do at home to practice my Aikido.Besides practicing with a weapon. :)

Drink Beer!! Everything hurts less with beer! Only of course if you are of legal drinking age, other wise by books, watch videos, meditate-visual imaging.
Cheers,
Gene

Jorx
08-09-2005, 09:06 AM
Mmm... the seiza advice must be taken carefully... it's hard on your knees...

maikerus
08-09-2005, 05:41 PM
Mmm... the seiza advice must be taken carefully... it's hard on your knees...

Seiza done poorly is hard on your knees. There are ways to make it less so. Just like any other technique, stance or movement there are a myriad of points that you should be taught when learning to sit in seiza.

However, you are correct in that you shouldn't do it too excess or past a pain threshold.

cheers,

--Michael

-

Jorx
08-10-2005, 08:54 AM
Nope. In the long run ANY seiza / shikko is hard on the knees. Human body is not built for that. So if Aikido is your thing my advice is to keep kneeling techs down to a minimum which you need to get better at tachiwaza and pass the examinations.