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Justin Gaar
06-01-2005, 09:49 AM
Hey Everybody,
I have a small dillema. I guess you could say i don't get out much outside of training for aikido, Except of course walking back and forth to school. The past couple of training sessions have not been exactly what you would call extrememly active, but i have been over come by a sense of exhaustion and overheating. I'd sweat ALOT and i'm talking alot, When i close my eyes it'd feel like my eyes were rolling all the way back into my head, i would involuntarily hyperventilate. I guess my ultimate question is, if you had a partner who had to sit out sometimes for a few minutes because of this, would you feel as that person was being detrimental to your training?
Thanks, Any Input would be appreciated. :ai: :ki:

cconstantine
06-01-2005, 10:03 AM
I would absolutely NOT have any negative opinion of someone needing a rest. There are many many factors that affect your physical performance. Things as simple as a little extra humidty, or a slight illness (mild cold or flu) can affect you drastically.

Make sure your *only* exhausted. Be wary of dehydration, heart palpitations (irregular or skipped beats) or very very high heart rates (over 120 if you're in your 20's/30's would be cause for immediate concern (in my non-medical opinion.)

Breathing exercises will probably help you if there is nothing physically wrong with you. Best of luck!
-c

bkedelen
06-01-2005, 12:06 PM
I do not think anyone will hold exhaustion against you as long as it is genuine. Be sure to drink water before training and challenge yourself to withstand the situation a little longer each time you train. Consciously breathing slower than you would instinctively, trying to maintain your posture, and forcing yourself to slow down your training will all help you develop a mentality of endurance (if not a physique).

Ron Tisdale
06-01-2005, 12:17 PM
Try to always start training 'peeing clear'. Best way to make sure you are hydrated. You loose water overnight...try to go to bed hydrated, and drink through out the day prior to training. Instead of moving quickly for technique, slow it way down, and try the breathing things mentioned above. Especially if you can do ukemi in one long out breath...that seems to help me a lot.

My partner about a week ago and I had to take occational breaks...but it was REALLY hot in the dojo that night, and although he was much younger than I, he had been out drinking the night before :) I don't mind at all...I'll kneel and work on my breath control, I'll do the basic movements associated with the techniuque, I'll work the technque alone, whatever...then when its safe to continue, we do.

Best,
Ron

DustinAcuff
06-01-2005, 12:32 PM
Your exhaustion could be a number of factors>

You could be getting a cold. You could have low potassium in your diet (do you eat bananas?). You could be dehydrated (drink more water). You could drink too many sodas (not good for hot weather, make you pee more and dehydrate you a la sodium). You might have gained some weight and it is just now caught up with you. You might have sleep depravation. Could be a growth spurt (depending on age). Could be a hormone shift (depending on age). Worst case is you have type 2 diabetes (if you are pretty overweight and have a bad diet you might want to go get checked).

There are any number of possibilities ranging from simple diet tweaks to things a whole lot more serious. If it keeps up go see a doctor.

Dustin

Stefan Stenudd
06-01-2005, 02:59 PM
There's a bundle of very good advice above, so I just want to mention a simple breathing technique for people out of breath:

Focus on breathing out, don't worry about breathing in.

Usually when people speed up their brathing, because of a sense of lack of air, they don't empty their lungs with each exhalation, but just make short breaths at the "top" of their lungs. When you feel a loss for air, you tend to refrain from breathing out properly. The result is that you just don't get enough fresh air in.

If you focus on breathing out, pushing the air out of the lungs, you body will itself take care of the breathing in, and you will get a lot of fresh air this way.
This is a particularly good technique to use when you are tense or nervous, for example in a grading or a demonstration.

Pauliina Lievonen
06-01-2005, 05:44 PM
There's a bundle of very good advice above, so I just want to mention a simple breathing technique for people out of breath:

Focus on breathing out, don't worry about breathing in.

Usually when people speed up their brathing, because of a sense of lack of air, they don't empty their lungs with each exhalation, but just make short breaths at the "top" of their lungs. When you feel a loss for air, you tend to refrain from breathing out properly. The result is that you just don't get enough fresh air in.

If you focus on breathing out, pushing the air out of the lungs, you body will itself take care of the breathing in, and you will get a lot of fresh air this way.
This is a particularly good technique to use when you are tense or nervous, for example in a grading or a demonstration.

Hear, hear! I quoted the whole post because you should read it again. :)

Personally I always start breathing excercises with an outbreath, for example.

kvaak
Pauliina

Jeanne Shepard
06-01-2005, 06:03 PM
I can't wait to get to class to try that tonight.

Jeanne

Stefan Stenudd
06-02-2005, 04:17 AM
I can't wait to get to class to try that tonight.Please, let me know how it worked out.

SeiserL
06-02-2005, 08:23 AM
Gotta support what is already said. Hydrate, slow down, relax, breathe, and enjoy yourself.

I am more impressed by those of us who have had to sit out to catch our breath and than get back into it than those who don't. Its just another part of training. People have always been respectful of me when I have had to and I extend the favor to others.

Ulises Garcia
06-02-2005, 09:36 AM
I remember, back in my days of Shito-Ryu Karate training, I got so tired one day that I thought I had something like the "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". I couldn't make it through the first 15 minutes of warm-up! Not only was I feeling tired, but I felt incredibly sleepy ( :blush: ), and my breathing became so difficult that I couldn't get enough air in no matter how much I inflated my lungs. I had to quit the class. It turns out that I was going through an anxiety attack so severe that I could've fainted right there :freaky: . My point is, in this modern age, anxiety is far more common than we think. Make sure that nothing is taking away your sleep at night, and that you hold no grudges against anyone.

U.

beanchild
06-09-2005, 09:35 AM
hey justin.
another thing to check is if you're eating properly, and getting enough sleep. those two things can really mess with your stamina on the mat, especially if you're going to a late class and you've had work/school all day.