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Paul Kerr
05-20-2005, 03:21 PM
I was diagnosed yesterday with a small umbilical hernia. It causes no discomfort whatsoever and my GP recommended a 'wait and see' approach - i.e. if it expands within 6 months we'll consider surgery.

I asked him specifically about continuing to train, describing as much as possible the impact of typical training. His response was "continue but just be careful". Understandable, but not very specific.

Has anyone here had such a condition and, if so, what should I be taking notice of (if anything)? Secondly, does anyone have any recommendations for reducing the risk, if possible, of this little belly-bubble increasing in size?

dan guthrie
05-20-2005, 09:09 PM
I've had two hernias operated on over the past decade. Both before I started training. One of my sempai, however, just had one about two months ago. I'll ask him the next time I see him. He and I both had inguenal hernias: little pouches of intestine that breach the stomach wall about halfway between the crotch and the front edge of the pelvic bone. My sempai was only out of the dojo for a month or so.

Listen to your doctor. Yeah, I know, DUH! I'll see him Monday night.

George S. Ledyard
05-21-2005, 01:08 AM
I was diagnosed yesterday with a small umbilical hernia. It causes no discomfort whatsoever and my GP recommended a 'wait and see' approach - i.e. if it expands within 6 months we'll consider surgery.

I asked him specifically about continuing to train, describing as much as possible the impact of typical training. His response was "continue but just be careful". Understandable, but not very specific.

Has anyone here had such a condition and, if so, what should I be taking notice of (if anything)? Secondly, does anyone have any recommendations for reducing the risk, if possible, of this little belly-bubble increasing in size?

Actually, I have this condition right now. I haven't done anything about it because my insurance coverage wasn't very good and I didn't have the money to do anything about it. That is changing soon.

I was told by a friend that it is somewhat dangerous for us as martial artists because if the intestine ruptured as a result of a hit, it could put undesirable bacteria into the abdominal area and infection would result.

He had his done and they actually patched the hole with a bit of kevlar of all thing... Patched it and stitched it basically. These days it's an outpatient surgery and you recover pretty quicky I believe.

Paul Kerr
05-21-2005, 03:48 AM
Thanks for the replies guys. I hadn't considered the risk associated with a possible hit and rupture, though I would consider it quite small. I was given 2 options for surgery - full narcosis or an epidural - and it is a simple 20 minute procedure with a fast recovery period. If I suddenly develop a balloon in my navel I guess I'll have to do something about it!

George - are there any particular techniques or exercises that you think need particular care or consideration?

About 20 years ago I had surgery for a small inguinal hernia and that limited my physical activity for about a month. The most abiding memory I have of that was lying in the hospital bed the night before the operation and getting a visit from the surgeon. She sat down beside me and said, "Mr. Kerr, this is a straightforward procedure that will only take us about 20 or 30 minutes to complete." Great, I thought, but then she went on to say, "However, you do realise that there are risks associated with any anaesthetic and people have died. That's very unlikely. What is certain though is that when you awake from the operation you will be in a good deal of pain."

Talk about a reassuring bedside manner! As you can imagine I didn't really sleep so well that night.

ikkitosennomusha
05-21-2005, 11:23 AM
I am sorry for the diagnosis. However, the good news is that it is a common condition and is treatable with a high success rate.

I have never had this condition but know someone who did. What they do in operation, in part, is infuse your tissue with a wire mesh. The tissue in turn is bonded and strengthened kind of like the old method of pouring concrete but this is better. After the surgery my friend had to let in heal for a short period. Th doctor told him it would be stronder than before.

I can certainly see ow one might become septic if the tissue burst but I imagine this would take quite a blow and if that was the case, someone might be "rough housing". Just take it easy and train smart.

Anat Amitay
05-22-2005, 07:48 AM
Dear Paul,
I don't know how to make links, but there was a thread started by Melissa Pittman Fischer in the "training" forum, in 03/31/2003 called "hernias". Maybe it will also have information that can interest you.
Hope it help, and get well!
Anat