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Aragorn
05-07-2005, 10:53 AM
The 3 basic attacks are:

Shomen uchi
Munnet ski
Yokemen uchi



Are they used a lot?

Im curous to know which is your favorite and why?
:eek:
Regards,
:ai: :ki: :do:

samurai_kenshin
05-07-2005, 02:03 PM
I'll have to say that none of those is my favorite! If I had to choos a fav out of all techniques, it would be either kokyu-nage, shihonage, or irimi-nage. Out of your choices i'd choose tsuki just because it is the most common attack in a real world fight (honestly, how many street brawlers do you see karate-chopping people?)

BTW it's spelled tsuki, not ski, but i had the same confusion, so dont worry bout it

Aristeia
05-07-2005, 02:35 PM
well you don't see a heap of step lunge puches n the real world either. Yokomen uchi most closely resembles the attacks you're most likely to face - haymakerpunch/overhand right.

ChrisHein
05-07-2005, 02:57 PM
I agree, yokomenuchi closest represents an ugly overhand right thrown by a person in distress. The motion of yokomenuchi also represents swinging attacks, like you might see done with a pool cue on a night of merriment.

On this list of attacks I would however include:
Katate dori
Gyakute dori
Morote dori
Kata dori
Ryote dori
eri dori
mune dori
all the ushiro, etc.
A full attack list should include more then just strikes.

-Chris Hein

samurai_kenshin
05-07-2005, 04:17 PM
I was under the impression he was talking about contering the attacks. I think all of those attacks can be countered using what I listed as my possible favorites.

Aragorn
05-07-2005, 04:33 PM
t (honestly, how many street brawlers do you see karate-chopping people?)

BTW it's spelled tsuki, not ski, but i had the same confusion, so dont worry bout it


Thanks about the Tsuki thingymabob.....


Regards,
:ai: :ki: :do:

Ketsan
05-07-2005, 07:08 PM
Kubi jime.

eyrie
05-08-2005, 03:14 AM
Don't get too hung up on the 3 basic "attacks" as attacks in themselves.
They are merely representations of striking motions in each of the 3 planes (or dimensions) - vertical, horizontal (side to side) and depth (straight).

Aragorn
05-08-2005, 08:47 PM
Thanks for advice

samurai_kenshin
05-08-2005, 09:52 PM
Thanks about the Tsuki thingymabob.....


Regards,
:ai: :ki: :do:
n/p. Really, there's things everyone wishes someone had told them earlier, then they tell oter people when they would like to have been told, to avoid similar confusion...:confused: ok, that didn't come out as smoothly as I had planned

Aragorn
05-21-2005, 08:53 AM
n/p. Really, there's things everyone wishes someone had told them earlier, then they tell oter people when they would like to have been told, to avoid similar confusion...:confused: ok, that didn't come out as smoothly as I had planned

Lol....
hmm....
I kinda got it , so it wasn't a complete failure...
Regards,
:ai: :ki: :do:

Stefan Stenudd
05-21-2005, 11:17 AM
There are so many ways to sort attack forms into groups. What I mostly find myself doing, is grouping them aihanmi and gyakuhanmi relations - I surely got it from Nishio sensei, who used that thinking a lot, with stunning results, of course.

Aihanmi katatedori is often somewhat neglected in aikido - for example, Hombu and many others simply say katatedori, all but excluding aihanmi, focusing mostly on gyakuhanmi because it is more reasonable as a wrist grip attack.
But the aihanmi relation - both tori and uke having, say, left arm and foot forward - is the most common guard position between two opponents. Also, in the sword arts, it's the basic kamae (with right arm and foot forward).
So, it needs to be studied thoroughly.

To me the aihanmi relation is such attacks as shomenuchi, tsuki (in most cases), maegeri, apart from aihanmi katatedori, of course. The gyakuhanmi relation is in katadori, munedori, yokomenuchi, mawashigeri, and others.

A third group is the ushiro relation, attacks from behind.

I have written about kogeki, attacks, here:
http://www.stenudd.com/aikido/attacks.htm

Personal favorites? Oh, I don't now... It happens that I focus on one or the other, for a while, but I can't say that I have a favorite. Well, probably both the katatedori (aihanmi and gyakuhanmi), judging from how much I use them in teaching.
Is that boring and conventional? Probably.