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Jory Boling
04-11-2005, 08:07 AM
So some people left Tomiki and made Fugakukai and then some more left Fugakukai and made Jiyushinkai? is that right? Other than something obvious like eliminating competition, what sets Fugakukai apart from Tomiki and further down the line, Jiyushinkai from Fugakukai?

My regular dojo is ASU and have recently trained with a fugakukai person and have only once before trained with jiyushinkai. What i know about both systems i've read about in the archives here on aikiweb.

Thanks!
Jory

Yann Golanski
04-11-2005, 08:31 AM
<pedentic>
Tomiki is a person who founded a style of Aikido called Shodokan.
</pedentic>

Jory Boling
04-11-2005, 09:32 AM
I mean i nknow the names of the players, like Tomiki, Karl Geis, Chuck Clark- but i'm wondering if any particulars were changed (other than eliminating competition). I mean, if somebody is proficient at jiyushinkai, would they also pretty much be familiart with the fugakukai katas and Shodokan katas? From the tiny tiny exposure i have had to Fugakukai and Jiyushinkai, I've noticed stylistic differences with ASU. I'm curious if there are any major differences between Shodokan, Fugakukai, and Jiyushinkai. For example, somebody told me Shodokan was relatively linear and Fugakukai added some circular movement back into it.
Thanks
Jory

Chuck Clark
04-11-2005, 09:56 AM
Hello Mr. Boling,

If you want to know something about Jiyushinkai Aikibudo practice I think it would be better to ask someone that practices it. You have a very skillful instructor close to you in OKC. David Martin is very capable of giving you some understanding of how we train. How we compare to Fugakukai or Shodokan is a large question. I haven't had direct contact with Fugakukai in about 21 years now. I have had hands on with a few of their members in that time but that is not a good sample. I have had very little experience other than watching videos of Shodokan or JAA practice other than during a three month stay in Tokyo in 1995.

I have no real interest in comparing because the three systems are quite different but similar. If you want comparison, there are only a few people that I know that have considerable experience in all three systems. To be honest, those people are probably not interested in an internet discussion on the subject. I think that if you want real, useful information you'll have to do the research yourself. Anything you get on the internet will be mostely conjecture from people that have very little experience that could answer your questions.

On another note, there'll be a book available within the next few months on the Jiyushinkai system.

Safe practice,

mj
04-11-2005, 12:55 PM
... (other than eliminating competition)...
Jesus Christ I knew things were tough but killing other sensei to get their students? :eek:

Anyway....
... somebody told me Shodokan was relatively linear...
I'm not sure it is more linear as such. Even the first technique, shomen ate, although seemingly linear, works on a vertical circle.

Visually it certainly looks more linear especially in randori because the attacks are too balanced and with too little overcommitment. If that makes any sense. :)

Jory Boling
04-11-2005, 01:09 PM
Jesus Christ I knew things were tough but killing other sensei to get their students? :eek:

e. :)

good one! i do understand what you're saying though, thanks!

jester
04-11-2005, 02:37 PM
Here the background for the Fugakukai history: http://www.karlgeis.com/origin.htm

deepsoup
04-11-2005, 03:56 PM
On another note, there'll be a book available within the next few months on the Jiyushinkai system.

That's interesting, Mr Clark. Will it be generally available when its published? I think I may feel a mail order purchase coming on...

Sean.
ps: Will it have "Don't quit, don't die!" on the cover in large friendly letters?

cguzik
04-11-2005, 04:26 PM
Jory,

I sometimes go down to OKC to practice with Martin Sensei after we finish our Sunday morning class. You should come along some time. I am sure you would enjoy it.

Chris

Patrick
04-11-2005, 07:46 PM
Nick Lowry's dojo is also in OKC if you want to work with some Fugakukai members.

Chuck Clark
04-11-2005, 07:52 PM
That's interesting, Mr Clark. Will it be generally available when its published? I think I may feel a mail order purchase coming on...

Sean.
ps: Will it have "Don't quit, don't die!" on the cover in large friendly letters?

Heh, Heh, That's not the title, but it's in the text in a few places. You can bet on that.

The book will be available to generally anyone that really wants it. It's a big book, workbook sized in fact (11 x 8) and it's looking like around 400 + pages. I'm in the process of redoing the photos now. I'm picky. There'll be general announcements when I get them in hand from the printers. It probably won't be necessary, because the sigh of relief may start tsunami in everyone's swimming pools... :)

Thanks for your interest, Sean.