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PeterR
03-14-2005, 10:48 PM
I've gotten myself a little confused.

I used the term Shiodin in a particular situation but someone asked me if that is supposed to be Shidoin.

Now I've been wrong before and, although red faced, will happily admit to it but ....

I did a google search on both terms and they come up under identical circumstance.

So which is correct and why. What kanji are involved.

I'm inclined to think that I made a mistake.

Chris Li
03-14-2005, 10:53 PM
I've gotten myself a little confused.

I used the term Shiodin in a particular situation but someone asked me if that is supposed to be Shidoin.

Now I've been wrong before and, although red faced, will happily admit to it but ....

I did a google search on both terms and they come up under identical circumstance.

So which is correct and why. What kanji are involved.

I'm inclined to think that I made a mistake.

"Shidoin", or "w".

Best,

Chris

PeterR
03-14-2005, 10:56 PM
And what do the individual Kanji mean.

Chris Li
03-14-2005, 11:01 PM
And what do the individual Kanji mean.

Well they look sort of garbled to me, but they should be:

"Shido": instruct (indicate, point to & guide, lead)
"in": member, person

In other words, an instructor.

Best,

Chris

PeterR
03-14-2005, 11:03 PM
Thanks Chris - another example where I get so used to hearing a term that I don't listen.

Michael Holm
03-15-2005, 01:49 AM
Well they look sort of garbled to me, but they should be:
Chris

If the Kanji does come out as "garbled" in your brower, the "Text encoding" must be changed. In the webbrowser Safari on a Mac, its done in the menu "View" - change it to "Japanese (Shift JIS)"

Then the Kanji is there beautifully :cool:

estel
03-15-2005, 01:59 AM
It can't possibly be Shiodin - since there is no "di" syllable in general use in Japanese (although a katakana equivalent may exist)

PeterR
03-15-2005, 02:16 AM
To make things worse I realize that 2 of the 5 hits for Shiodin with google are due to my error. I think this is some sort of justice for starting the Shinan thread.

Don_Modesto
03-15-2005, 03:27 PM
To make things worse I realize that 2 of the 5 hits for Shiodin with google are due to my error. I think this is some sort of justice for starting the Shinan thread.

Isn't that the one where PAG came through with his usual erudite analysis? Then it's to your credit and not at all needing of punishment. Great thread, it was.

Rupert Atkinson
03-15-2005, 03:34 PM
First of all, it is three characters, shi-dou-in, and the central one has longer pronunciation.

The first two together mean to instruct, and the last means something like, personnel. So, all three together just mean instructor/guide. Aikikai takes this term and uses it to mean - something less shihan (which in itself just means teacher, but in martial arts speak means senior teacher). In other organisations, shi-dou-in will likely mean something else in real terms. (As a side note, just to show the flexibility of these terms, in Korean martial arts shihan is equivallent to the standard sensei - in Korea every sensei is a shihan).

(shihan = sabeom in Korean - in fact, in Korea they even add the polite nim to sabeom (sabeom-nim), the equivallent of saying sensei-shi in Japanese.)

Chris Li
03-15-2005, 04:20 PM
If the Kanji does come out as "garbled" in your brower, the "Text encoding" must be changed. In the webbrowser Safari on a Mac, its done in the menu "View" - change it to "Japanese (Shift JIS)"

Then the Kanji is there beautifully :cool:

Unfortunately, changing the text encoding didn't work for me, either in Safari or in Firefox, although Japanese isn't normally a problem in either. Anyway, I know what they look like already :).

Best,

Chris

Chris Li
03-15-2005, 04:25 PM
Aikikai takes this term and uses it to mean - something less shihan (which in itself just means teacher, but in martial arts speak means senior teacher).

Generally speaking, "shihan" generally refers to a fairly high level of teacher - in or out of martial arts. "Shidoin" is a specific level in the Aikikai (but just outside of Japan, normally), but in general refers to your basic generic instructor type. "Shido" by itself is often used as well in day-to-day affairs, as in "who's teaching tonight?".

Best,

Chris

Charlie
03-15-2005, 05:32 PM
Yoshinkan Honbu Dojo Instructors (titles)


Inoue Kancho
Chida Dojo-cho
Shioda Shihan
Sanada Shihan
Chino Shihan
Oyamada Kyoshi
Itoh Jokyo
Sakano Jokyo
Murata Jokyo
Takashima Shidoin
Noriki Shidoin
Nakano Itaku Shidoin
Friend Itaku Shidoin
Murray Itaku Shidoin
Woo Itaku Shidoin
Ballares Itaku Shidoin

adriangan
03-16-2005, 08:19 AM
Yoshinkan Honbu Dojo Instructors (titles)


Inoue Kancho
Chida Dojo-cho
Shioda Shihan
Sanada Shihan
Chino Shihan
Oyamada Kyoshi
Itoh Jokyo
Sakano Jokyo
Murata Jokyo
Takashima Shidoin
Noriki Shidoin
Nakano Itaku Shidoin
Friend Itaku Shidoin
Murray Itaku Shidoin
Woo Itaku Shidoin
Ballares Itaku Shidoin


hi guys,

can someone tell me what Itaku means?

eyrie
03-16-2005, 11:15 PM
Depending on the school/style/system, shidoin usually refers to someone 3rd dan or above, but below shihan, which is 6th-7th dan.

Chris Li
03-16-2005, 11:41 PM
hi guys,

can someone tell me what Itaku means?

A part-time, or contract instructor (as opposed to the regularly employed teaching staff).

Best,

Chris

estel
03-18-2005, 11:41 PM
I not one of the teachers there has the title "kyoshi"
I thought kyoshi was the humble form of sensei, why would an instructor use that title, unless referring to themself?

Chris Li
03-19-2005, 12:57 AM
I not one of the teachers there has the title "kyoshi"
I thought kyoshi was the humble form of sensei, why would an instructor use that title, unless referring to themself?

"Kyoshi" is another form of the word "instructor". "Sensei" is a generic honorific used for just about anyone who teaches anything - from nursery school teachers to the teacher of your local pottery class.

Best,

Chris