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neb1979
02-22-2005, 07:44 AM
Hi everyone, I have been training Aikido now for about four months and up until four weeks ago I was training three times a week with seminars in between. Now i can only train once a week because of a new job I have. I have the opportunity to take private lessons during the week with Sensei at times that we are both available.

The question I'm asking is do you think that private lesson are as good ( do you get as much out of them ) as you would a group lesson?

Everybody's advise would be much appreciated.

Thanks Ben :)

Robert Townson
02-22-2005, 08:02 AM
Hi,

I would think that you will learn more as you are be taught by and practicing with your teacher.
You won't have to worry about space as much, and if you have any questions you can ask them without fear of interrupting anyone else's training.

The benefit of group training is people do things in different ways so you will be attacked differently and thrown differently. Plus there is the whole group spirit.

rob_liberti
02-22-2005, 08:18 AM
It really depends on the teacher and your ability to learn from that one person who is many levels beyond you.

For me, I always perfered to work out with my classmates under my teacher's direction because I felt I got more out of that experience. If that is not an option, then I think the only way for you to determine if this works for you is to try it.

I only think private lessons are worth teaching if the student is very sincere and they have some special circumstances, like they want to really do some swordword fundimentals training and get the feeling of a senior student being their partner - of if they have some injury and want to work through it with someone qualified to help them work out and stay safe given their odd body limitation. It takes an incredibly serious student to get me to do private lessons with them if they just don't have time for classes. I have not met too many of those students.

Rob

Eric Webber
02-22-2005, 12:23 PM
I think that private lessons can be very beneficial, but should not be the main instrument of your training. However, given current circumstances, one group training and a private lesson versus only one group training per week? - no brainer. Pick your Sensei's brain while you have the chance, have fun, and remember that schedules always change in time. Good luck.

taras
02-22-2005, 12:43 PM
I am in a similar situation working away a lot, so over the weekend I take a private class, which my sensei is kind enough to teach me. In addition to everything already said here I would add that it is probably better if there are two students and a sensei. This way you get to see the moves better, when you don't have to be an uke.

Aristeia
02-22-2005, 02:37 PM
What Taras said. Also remember that the key to advancing in any martial art is repetitions. Be aware that in smaller groups like this I've found there is always a tendancy to move through stuff quickly and not do as many reps as in a general class. Fight that urge.

p00kiethebear
02-22-2005, 03:26 PM
I'd say go for it if you can afford it.

I've bennefitted very well from private lessons.

neb1979
02-25-2005, 10:48 AM
Thanks everyone for your ideas and opinions they have been very helpful

Aikidoiain
02-25-2005, 12:02 PM
Hi Ben,

As I've mentioned in my many posts, most of my instruction was done privately (or informally, as I called it) with various teachers. I found that this one-to-one approach really suited me. I also picked up things a lot faster than I would have had I been able to attend a club.

I was a working musician at this time, so I could not go to dojos at night as I was out gigging. I never did any grading though, as I simply wanted to learn how to defend myself using Aikido. I also got some training in Aiki-Jujitsu during these years.

Sometimes, others would also come along, which allowed us to role-play likely fight scenarios. This was especially beneficial to me, as I was soon to find out later!

I have no rank in Aikido, although I did attend a Hapkido club for a while and attain a yellow belt.

I'd say private teaching is fine.

Iain.
:ki: :)

Yokaze
02-25-2005, 01:18 PM
Just my own experience here...

I showed up for a saturday morning class, to find that no other students showed up. It was just me, the sensei, and a tanto. (Wooden dagger.) I haven't learned so much from a single session before or since. It was a wonderful experience. I would strongly suggest private lessons with a sensei or sempai as an excellent supplement for group lessons.

Aikidoiain
02-25-2005, 01:43 PM
I agree with Rob.

On a couple of occasions no one at Hapkido but myself and the 2nd Dan Instructor turned up, and boy, he showed me things he'd never divulge in normal club training!

That session will always stick in my mind. He taught me some real life-saving stuff that later I was actually forced to use while being mugged by knife wielding assailants!

Iain.
:ki: :)

Ermek Apazov
02-26-2005, 04:07 AM
Hi everyone, I have been training Aikido now for about four months and up until four weeks ago I was training three times a week with seminars in between. Now i can only train once a week because of a new job I have. I have the opportunity to take private lessons during the week with Sensei at times that we are both available.

The question I'm asking is do you think that private lesson are as good ( do you get as much out of them ) as you would a group lesson?

Everybody's advise would be much appreciated.

Thanks Ben :)

Mr. Ben
That's good that you are training in aikido.So if I were in your shoes i would train with a group, cuz it is more interesting, but on the other hand you have a good chance to acquire more things that your sensei would teach you, you will be more concentrate and useful.It just depend on your will.Its up to you man
Regards Ermek

Khaled
02-26-2005, 05:39 AM
according to my little experience,
I think private lessons will be much better.the teacher will focus on you only.
but as you every thing has its advantages and disadvantages.

to me I think the disadvantages are:
1- cost.
2- your teacher will not be able to see you executing technique properly cuz he will be the opponent.
I remember our sensei told me once that he can not judge if the technique is right or wrong if he cant see it from a proper distance executing with another person.

good luck in your journey.
:)

bennettdjr
02-26-2005, 01:36 PM
hi,
Iain when you say "(or informally, as I called it)" what exactley do you mean. I know this seems like a bit of a stupid question but i don't really understand what you mean. Sorry.
Dave

Lyle Laizure
02-26-2005, 06:13 PM
I think anytime you can get one on one time with your sensei is great. You are able to cover a lot of specific material. It can be overwhelming but every chance I get I take advantage of it.