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aikidoka- jalta
02-11-2005, 03:41 PM
hi every body,
i would like to ask a question, what if some body practiced aikido for several years and had to quit for several reasons and after 3 years of quitting his training decided to come back, this practicioner should start from where he stoped or should start from 0 thanks in advance for your replies

Aristeia
02-11-2005, 04:07 PM
in our organisation he'd keep his rank if that's what you're asking. but it may be a while before he grades again

Greg Jennings
02-11-2005, 04:57 PM
There is no single policy.

In my mind, it's proficiency that matters anyway and it's going to take the person the same amount of time to get the next rank no matter what.

Best,

Alvin H. Nagasawa
02-11-2005, 06:56 PM
FYI, We have a policy at our dojo, If there a student that has previous Aikido training in the past. And has wants to get back in training, He or she if the last rank was a KYU. Will retain it but will be at the bottom of the present kyu in there respected Kyu ranking in the Dojo. And will have to put in the required hours of training to go up to the next rank. Ask for a Yudansha it would be the same situation in testing situation. But if he or she is older by rank he or she would sit to the right of there kohai. One has to respect there age in this situation.

maikerus
02-11-2005, 11:46 PM
I would say that as long as you are going back to the same style you should be recognized for the training that you had already done.

However, I am sure that the instructor would be careful not to expect the same level of uke and understanding from you that you possessed on the day you left. So, as people have already said, in a grading situation it should be based on the current ability and not the time from the previous test.

My few yen,

--Michael

Lyle Laizure
02-26-2005, 06:34 PM
Once a grade is earned a student, whether for personal reasons or whatever chooses not to attend class, upon return would retain the rank previously earned. I do not think the individuals skill level will be where it was before leaving but as someone else mentioned it will be a while before the person grades again. Sometimes though it can depend on the individual. I can't say without fail that I would recognize a students previous rank even if they had trained at my dojo. Too many scenarios to consider.

djalley
03-28-2005, 01:47 PM
I left aikido for almost 10 years and came back to it about a year ago now. My instructor honored me by allowing me to keep my former rank, as our styles were incredibly similar. This also would have saved me about $120 in testing fees over time while I "re-earned" my current rank through practice.

I however opted to start over completely, as I had forgotten most of my training, was seriously out of practice, and rank wasn't all that important to me. Another factor in my decision was that I felt if I was wearing the belt, I had better be able to perform at that level, something I felt I was unable to do. Now, I feel I have earned my rank, and my classmates know that I have "payed my dues" to obtain the current rank.

I do not regret my decision.

:ai: D

Jerry Miller
03-28-2005, 10:08 PM
We have a fellow Dan ranked who has come back after about a ten year absence. He seems to be managing well and is wearing his hakama. I myself came back after a 32 year absence. I started at the beginning. In my own delusions I thought that I would do better than I am. The style is a little different but close enough. I do not bounce as well as when I was a teenager but I am getting better. I still have not come full circle either in ability nor in Kyu ranking after two years. The most effective thing for me was to come in with a clear head thinking that I know nothing. I remember reading somewhere that someone felt if a kyu rank left for more than a year that they should start at the beginning.

batemanb
03-29-2005, 02:38 AM
We recently had a 1st kyu return after a 5 year sabatical. He keeps his rank, his technique is not bad at all and he uke's almost as well as did before. If someones earned the rank, we let them keep it, and as has been mentioned above, he's still got to put the same amount of time in if he wants to grade up from there :).

rgds

Bryan

markman2025
03-29-2005, 10:10 AM
i guess it all depends on the rank that you were in, if the rank you hold is not that high it would be wise to restart your training from the very start, on the other hand if you hold a belt of say brown or higher i suppose its ok to pick up where you started........

gregstec
03-29-2005, 02:24 PM
We have a fellow Dan ranked who has come back after about a ten year absence. He seems to be managing well and is wearing his hakama. I myself came back after a 32 year absence. I started at the beginning. In my own delusions I thought that I would do better than I am. The style is a little different but close enough. I do not bounce as well as when I was a teenager but I am getting better. I still have not come full circle either in ability nor in Kyu ranking after two years. The most effective thing for me was to come in with a clear head thinking that I know nothing. I remember reading somewhere that someone felt if a kyu rank left for more than a year that they should start at the beginning.

I came back after a 28 year absence and I know what you mean about not 'bouncing' the same way as before - also have bad knees now. I know more about Aikido now than before, but I still do not think my technique has the fluid movements I had back in the 70s. Obviously, I started at the bottom as well and I just had my first real test since 1977 the other week - still have some things to work on :)

Greg Steckel

Jerry Miller
03-29-2005, 10:43 PM
Good luck to you Greg. when I was a kid I used to laugh at the adults with knee problems like I have now. I serves me right. At least I knew enough to be able to judge the Dojo that I chose.

Amir Krause
03-30-2005, 06:58 AM
Rank only means something real inside the same dojo. Hence, if you return to the same dojo with the same teachers, you are likely to return at your previous rank, otherwise, the local teacher will decide, partially, according to your ability.

I would not put too much importance on rank in any case.


Amir

gregstec
03-30-2005, 10:07 AM
Good luck to you Greg. .
Thanks!

when I was a kid I used to laugh at the adults with knee problems like I have now. I serves me right..

It is tough getting old - most students think us old folks do not like taking Ukemi because of all the falling - This is absolutely not true - falling is easy, the hard part is constantly getting back up :)

One thing that does bother me though is that I have problems keeping up with the faster pace when training with younger students - I get out of breath and just need to slow down for a while to help compose myself, but I feel guilty because my training partner has to wait.


Good luck to you as well

Greg Steckel

MaryKaye
03-30-2005, 11:12 AM
One thing that does bother me though is that I have problems keeping up with the faster pace when training with younger students - I get out of breath and just need to slow down for a while to help compose myself, but I feel guilty because my training partner has to wait.


Little do you know how often your younger training partner is thinking "Thank goodness, an excuse to take a breath without losing face!"

Seriously, older students are often great training partners because they have long experience of their bodies, aren't as inclined to be impatient, and don't have as much to "prove." We have a 61-year-old shodan who we beg to come to class more often because he's just so much fun to train with, and can teach so much to his partner.

Mary Kaye
(41 and younger than average for my dojo--we're a pretty gray-haired lot.)

gregstec
03-30-2005, 12:21 PM
Little do you know how often your younger training partner is thinking "Thank goodness, an excuse to take a breath without losing face!"

Well, the other students are really not too much of a problem in this area, it actually is our Sensei. In our dojo, Sensei will show the technique and then train with us as a normal training partner - he is the one with all the energy that wears me down quick. Nevertheless, I think it is a great way to learn - this way you get to feel both sides of the instruction.


Seriously, older students are often great training partners because they have long experience of their bodies, aren't as inclined to be impatient, and don't have as much to "prove." We have a 61-year-old shodan who we beg to come to class more often because he's just so much fun to train with, and can teach so much to his partner..)

I can relate to this... I learned a long time ago that all things need to move at a natural pace and will lose substance if rushed, and the only thing that needs to be proved is the fact that nothing really needs to be proved; things just are :)


Greg Steckel

RebeccaM
04-26-2005, 07:57 PM
After four years of little to no aikido I was allowed to keep my rank when I joined the Boulder Aikikai. That was almost two years ago. I was so rusty I was thinking about demoting myself, but my pride wouldn't let me. :/ You'll have to talk to the instructor about it. Policies may vary.

I've gotten back to where I was when I stopped training and even progressed a bit, but that took time. I'm still embarassingly far behind on weapons, but, unlike with the hand-to-hand stuff, I've prety much had to start fresh in that dpeartment since things are done differently here than they were in my former dojo. Different shihan = diiferent kumitachi and kumijo I guess. It might have been easier to shake the rust off if I'd been able to be more consistenet, but grad school can get in the way of living sometimes.

Joost Korpel
04-27-2005, 07:59 AM
I recntly returned to my old Aikido club after a 14 year hiatus. I was a sankyu rank when I left. I spoke to the current head instructor, who said it was fine to keep my old rank. Since sankyu is still a white belt in my club, I didn't feel any pressure to perform at my previous level. I just relaxed and enjoyed my training.

The amazing thing to me is that I couldn't mentally remember many of the techniques, but my body retained muscle memory and just naturally moved through the technique. Granted I was rough around the edges but after about 50 hours of practice and a couple of seminars I'm pretty much back to the level I was when I stopped. As some people have mentioned though, it takes me a little longer to get up from ukemi, particulalry after a high fall :freaky:

In truth it wouldn't have mattered to me what rank I started at, but I do appreciate not having to pay those testing fees again. Best of luck returning to your practice.