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jon_jankus
01-27-2005, 08:44 AM
I'm postponing it as long as I can, but it appears that knee replacement surgery is in my future. Has anyone out there had a knee replacement? If so, were you able to continue with Aikido, or was it necessary to move on?

jonreading
01-27-2005, 11:05 AM
I had ACL replacement surgery in 1998. I was back on the mat within 2 weeks and back to full strength within 3 months. I was also 21 years old and very athletic at the time.

I am active and regularly excercise to maintain muscle strength in that leg. Most of the time, class/training is not influenced by my knee. Occassionally, my knee will tire during longer seminars, intense shikko/suwari waza or a really hard class. Since my surgery, I developed arthritis. That means extra stretching and avoiding cold weather training.

You'll have to work to keep your knee helthy, but it didn't prevent me from training...

Janet Rosen
01-27-2005, 01:00 PM
As an RN and an acl graft recipient, I have to say, a knee replacement is very different from acl surgery in the affects on the joint. Our experiences will not be pertinent to the Jon who started the thread...but I"m going to be lurking hoping to read input from folks who have had knee replacements, just to add to the knowledge base!

John Boswell
01-27-2005, 01:41 PM
It is my understanding that Ikeda Sensei has had at least one knee replacement if not both. Goodness knows HE's still active!

Can anyone confirm/deny this? Jun? Just checkin...

Charlie
01-27-2005, 01:48 PM
Parker Shihan, 8th dan Yoshinkan was presented with the prospect of knee replacement. He chose a different route and is still practicing today. Weigh all your options carefully

akiy
01-27-2005, 02:07 PM
It is my understanding that Ikeda Sensei has had at least one knee replacement if not both.
To my knowledge, what he had done to his knees were not replacements. I believe they were arthroscopic procedures.

-- Jun

stuartjvnorton
01-27-2005, 04:26 PM
Is it true that knee replacements only bend to about 90 degrees or so?
I remember hearing something like it once: they're developed in the west, so western culture, no seiza, etc so no perceived need.
Is thing true?

That might make taking someone to ground a bit more difficult.

John Boswell
01-28-2005, 12:42 PM
Thanks Jun!

Stuart, speaking as my Mother's Son... Mom had her knee replaced about 8 years ago. Her knee was in really bad shape and it was an unusal circumstance. HOWEVER, the prosthetic (sp?) that they used was too short. For that reason, her knee only goes to 90 degrees.

If all the measurements are done right and everything goes according to plan, you should have full range of motion. If measurements are wrong or they get in there and find something else wrong unexpectedly... then who knows?

For anyone thinking of such a surgery: DO YOUR HOMEWORK... ASK LOTS OF QUESTIONS... and above all: Find the BEST Doctor you can. Do NOT settle for second best because once they are in there and cutting, there is no going back.

PS: Rehab is a bitch so exercise and get in shape BEFORE the surgery... especially your legs.

Janet Rosen
01-28-2005, 12:52 PM
PS: Rehab is a bitch so exercise and get in shape BEFORE the surgery... especially your legs.
John, this is EXCELLENT advice. It is amazing how fast the quads and hamstrings atrophy. And sometimes after surgery (or injury) there is a phenomenon where the quads stop firing, and need special attention in rehab to relearn. So getting them as strong as possible ahead of time is really a good plan.
I'd also add making sure to try to get hips, iliiotibial band, plus quads and hamstrings, as limber as possible with a good stretching regimen ahead of time.

Carrie
02-16-2005, 10:02 AM
Hi,

My father had knee replacement surgery last year at the age of 62. From my perspective there are 2 critical issues....

1) There are a great number of adjustments, calculations, angles, etc. to get right. Pick a top notch surgeon. My father had his done at The Cleveland Clinic in Miami, and I recommend them highly. If I ever had to have it, I'd make sure the person that performed my surgery was one of the best. Also, examine which knee you will get. If memory serves Dad's is titanium.

2) Commitment to rehab is critical. Do what the Doc says. That knee will try to heal as tightly as possible. Only through stretching it will you regain range of motion. I have met a few people who didn't follow through with rehab, and they have only marginally functional legs. My father took it seriously, and was doing full knee bends for the first time *I* can ever remember.

Of course he doesn't practice Aikido, but hopefully his experience can be relevant. I'd spend some time talking through this with your Doc.

Best of Luck,
Carrie

Bronson
02-16-2005, 11:59 AM
What exercises might one do to strengthen the muscles of the leg if the knee is in bad enough shape to need replacement?

Not trying to be a jerk, just genuinely curious :)

Bronson

Janet Rosen
02-16-2005, 05:07 PM
What exercises might one do to strengthen the muscles of the leg if the knee is in bad enough shape to need replacement?
Nope, it IS a good question, Bronson.
A knee replacement is generally done when articular cartilage loss is great enough to cause disabling pain/loss of joint stability. A PT should be able to suggest a mild strengthening regime for preop conditioning.

Jeanne Shepard
02-16-2005, 06:56 PM
sometimes after surgery (or injury) there is a phenomenon where the quads stop firing, and need special attention in rehab to relearn. So getting them as strong as possible ahead of time is really a good plan.


Has anyone read the neurologist Oliver Sachs book, A Leg to Stand On? He discusses this-says he felt as if his leg didn't belong to him. It was fascinating, and I'd look for a rehab doctor who had that kind of empathy for his patients.

Jeanne

Janet Rosen
02-16-2005, 09:54 PM
Hi, Jeanne. It's a GREAT book!!! I totally recommned it....but actually the phenomenon is different. I've had the non-firing problem twice, once postop and once postinjury, but never experienced alienation or disconnect from the limb or any part of it. My take on it would be that the non-firing quads is a very localized phenomenon; sensation and proprioception are intact and the motor affect is also in a small area, so that it's way less global an issue than Sachs experienced, or, say a poststroke left neglect.