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arjandevries
12-18-2004, 01:49 AM
Hi all,

I am starting for myself in Januari 2005 with a small group.

I was wondering if you all could share some thoughts with me on the training sequence.
I thought about this: practise is 1 hour.

aikido taiso 15 minutes (we have a basic routine)
taisabaki 5 minutes
ukemi 10 minutes
techniques including principles 25 minutes
free practise 5 minutes
cooling down

Give or take a minute off course.

What do you do? What are your thought?
Please feel free to share them with me.

Thanks,

arjan

PeterR
12-18-2004, 02:31 AM
Arjan;

How often do you meet - one hour is awfully short.

My group meets once a week for its main class and that is 2 hours long. There is also a full hour of free practice available.

arjandevries
12-18-2004, 03:30 AM
I know.
There is no other way.
To start there is 1 class of 1 hour. At least for the next three months. But you have to start somewhere don't you agree?

Arjan

PeterR
12-18-2004, 03:45 AM
Yes absolutely.

OK - then I suggest dropping the ukemi portion and combining ukemi training with the regular portion.
In the beginning you might be doing more, latter you might be doing less.

I also suggest dividing the regular section into two where the first part you do known techniques and the second you do something different. That keeps your own interest up.

batemanb
12-18-2004, 07:48 AM
Arjan,

I started a new club up in June this year, but like Peter, I am afforded a 2 hour session. Nearly all my students are beginners so I tend to do 15 minutes of warm up and stretches, 1 hour of kihon waza based on ai hanmi katate dori or gyaku hanmi katate dori followed by 45 minutes of "instructors choice". This gives them a chance to maintain continuity with the techniques that they are going to be graded on when they get to their first grading, and hopefully provides some more advanced stuff to inspire them to keep coming :).

I also teach a kids class for an hour, it is not a long time! Sometimes I do ukemi and taisabaki practice as separate sections but most often I combine them with regular practice. I agree with Peter that given your timescales it may be better to incorporate them. I would also suggest that 5 minutes of jiyu keiko is hardly worth it, it`s a nice idea but maybe better off when you have a longer class.

Regards

Bryan

akiy
12-18-2004, 09:21 AM
Hi Arjan,

I think such things as a teaching sequence really depends on many different things. For example, we don't have anything like a set of "aikido taiso," although we do warm up, and that for only ten minutes or so for an hour class. Also, sometimes there are only beginners in a class whereas other times, I may only have yudansha, so the focus of the class may differ according to who attends.

In any case, I think having any sort of teaching plan or curriculum makes a class rigid in its flow and structure. I very much prefer feeling how the class is responding to whatever we're doing and go from there.

Just my thoughts.

-- Jun

batemanb
12-18-2004, 10:28 AM
Jun bought up a very good point there regarding the level of people in the class. In my new dojo, as I said they are pretty much all beginners so it is not so much of a problem. However, when I teach over at our main dojo, I have no idea until class starts as to who will be in attendance, therefore you need to be flexible in your class plan. A basic plan that can be adapted is not a bad idea.

Regards

Bryan

Bronson
12-18-2004, 11:36 PM
1 1/2 hour class.

15 min to a 1/2 hour aikitaiso and ukemi

1+ hour aikido practice---whatever the instructor feels like doing :D

Bronson

Hanna B
12-19-2004, 09:29 PM
With just one hour, I would suggest skip the aikido taiso and instead use slow and easy aikido training as a worm up. However if your group contains beginners, then I think it becomes more difficult to do that... is it possible to ask the students to do the warm up before class? Maybe you can do it together outside the tatami?

I think it is good to have a plan for class, especially when new to teaching, but not follow it too strictly.

maikerus
12-19-2004, 11:27 PM
I teach a couple of 1 hour classes and it works well.

10 mins - set warmup
10 mins - kihon dosa / ukemi
40 mins - one or maybe two techniques including explanations and principles

Warm down is after class on own time - while sweeping. We also do a 2 minute mokuso at the end of class before bowing out.

Our 90 min class is about the same, except the kihon dosa is about 15 mins and the techniques are about an hour.

cheers,

--Michael

Joe Bowen
12-19-2004, 11:41 PM
I teach two types of classes here. On the US military base where that class meets only 3 times a week we do an hour and a half classes. Off the base I teach two times a week, but most of the students attend classes that are offered everyday several times during the day, so those classes are only one hour long. Either way I spend basically 15 minutes on warm ups and include basic ukemi in the warm up. Most of the folks on the base I only have for about a year if I'm lucky before they rotate to another assignment and move away. This class tends to remain pretty basic; so I come to class with an idea of what I want to teach and adjust it depending on whether or not the students grasp the fundamental principles. Off post, I sometimes get a good number of folks that have been practicing for a while. When that happens, I drop any preconceived ideas and just have fun letting the class instruction flow from inspiration. It works out fine.
I have visited the NY Aikikai in NYC, and they ask that you come early and warm up on your own, so that when class starts you go right into the instruction. This is a good way to save time, if you are able to control the flow in the training area....

joe

Hanna B
12-20-2004, 12:03 AM
I used to teach a one hour class with mixed levels, followed by another one hour class for those who had trained at least a few months. The first hour passed so quickly... with newbies, everything takes such long time.

Pavel.Dobrus
12-20-2004, 05:58 AM
We have 90 minutes lessons, but often is up to 120 minutes.

I teach beginner class twice a week and advanced class ocassionaly. Both I start with warm up (around 10 minutes), then kihon dosa (15 minutes) followed by ukemi (15 minutes) (time is approximate). Then kihon waza, one or two kihon techniques on which I wanna show some principles and then their evolution to less formal form.

Almost same training sequence for both, beginners and advanced, the more detailed for advanced, of course. Of course, this is not strict sequence of training, but it is usual sequence,

Sometimes there is special training for the ukemis or uke's work and so on.

arjandevries
12-20-2004, 07:08 AM
Hi all,

This goes very well! It helps a lot.
As for the class. It will be all new people so it is a basic class with ikkyo, iriminage, shihonage and kokyo ho. When we are a few month further I will intergrate techniques from 5th kyu and some more kokyonage.
As for now; I have a more advanced group in my home town dojo up to nidan level.
In this class I usually pick a view principles and try to give them with tecqniques.
This month is basic month so all basic techniques and principles will be tought in class.

Thanks and keep going on sharing ideas,

Arjan

Lyle Laizure
12-21-2004, 10:32 PM
Planning is fine and it is good to have plenty of material, but the pace of class should only go as fast as the slowest person. Take your time and don't rush. Even if you have advanced students in your class spending time on the basics is always gold.

PeterR
12-21-2004, 10:56 PM
Planning is fine and it is good to have plenty of material, but the pace of class should only go as fast as the slowest person. Take your time and don't rush. Even if you have advanced students in your class spending time on the basics is always gold.
Lyle - really.

I tend to aim for the happy medium with a chunk set aside for the fastest couple in class.

The slower get pulled-up and the fastest don't get bored.

Hanna B
12-22-2004, 08:15 AM
A happy inbetween can be constructed in many ways. Such as, parts of it adjusted to the slowest person, and parts to the more advanced people.

Lyle Laizure
12-27-2004, 11:21 PM
I tend to aim for the happy medium with a chunk set aside for the fastest couple in class.
The slower get pulled-up and the fastest don't get bored

Nothing wrong with a happy medium. It is important to keep class interesting for the more advanced or faster folks. I do this by individualizing the training. Once a technique is shown and practice has begun I work with the individual couples adjusting, adding or subtracting nuaunces to create more advanced aplications to better suit the individual.

class should only go as fast as the slowest person.
Meaning that if you have a class that is majoritvely beginners I am not likely to show advanced techniques. The application being taught will apply to the general mass then as mentioned above within the practice itself I can adjust for the individual(s).

Olga Mihailova
12-28-2004, 03:31 AM
This year the beginners class started separately from the intermediate and advanced ones, so that they don't interact at all. They are doing lots of AIki-taiso, ukemi, tai-sabaki, all ways of irimi and different movements not finishing it with the throw - and only one or two techniques in a whole practice. And they are doing great! They are not bored either - in four months of the 20 people only few quitted. Since they are all newbies they have nothing to compare to. And now I am really surprised at how good their ukemi are, how quickly they catch the new techniques and how free they feel - not affraid of the mistakes.

Well, it is not my class, I am a student myself, but this idea was new this year and it worked so well, that sensei feels sorry that he didn't do something like that in the previous years.

ali og
12-28-2004, 09:55 AM
I am a beginner, and I train in a class that runs the gamut from advanced to just-walked-in-the-dojo. Our sensei tends to work with three techniques in a class session, all related and each builds off the first. So we start with the more basic and move into more advanced. I suspect that many of you who teach do the same thing. I really like it because it gives me a sense of where I'm heading as well as the basics (where I "should be"). As a learner, I need to see the "big picture" in order to understand the basic elements/techniques. Working with a "one room schoolhouse" can be a wonderful challenge and are different than the experience that Olga describes. I think it really depends on the mix of students and their skill level/learning orientation.

arjandevries
01-25-2005, 09:04 AM
Hi all,

Thanks for all the replies. In the meantime the first two classes have already past.
In the first free lesson there were 23 people!
I had never expected this. The next lesson was the first paid lesson. There where 16 people so it goes well!

Greetings,

Arjan
Netherlands

Don_Modesto
01-25-2005, 04:26 PM
In the first free lesson there were 23 people!....The next lesson was the first paid lesson. There where 16 people so it goes well!

Nice retention. Take a picture to show folks in a year.

arjandevries
01-26-2005, 01:39 AM
Hi Don,

Thanks. I think I know what you mean. What is left after a year...
I remember the photo from my home dojo 11 years ago.
I am the only one left.....

Arjan

Jonathan
01-26-2005, 09:49 AM
I have been teaching aikido for a long time now and have settled on a daily training regimen that goes like this:

15 min. stretching
5-8 min. rolls (20 mai ukemi, 20 ushiro ukemi, 15 tobu ukemi)
10 min. suwari waza
45 min. technique practice (usually only one or two techniques)
10 min. randori.

I have been thinking that I'd like to abandon the stretching segment (students could warm up on their own before class begins) in favour of practicing striking, centering, and sensitivity exercises. So much to do, so little time...

I find that a set training program is much more useful than "going with the flow". It has been my experience that too much "spontaneity" in leading a class creates technical weaknesses in students. Boredom may be avoided with such spontaneity, but students lose out on building the reps base they need to become strong and proficient in Aikido technique. Only tasting techniques, and nibbling on principles leads to technically "malnourished" aikidoka. But this is what happens when a class meanders through many different aikido techniques and exercises in every session.

Just a word of caution.

Hope your dojo is a great success, Arjan!

arjandevries
01-27-2005, 07:04 AM
Thanks Jonathan!

I think your post has a point!

Arjan

maikerus
01-27-2005, 05:23 PM
15 min. stretching
5-8 min. rolls (20 mai ukemi, 20 ushiro ukemi, 15 tobu ukemi)
10 min. suwari waza
45 min. technique practice (usually only one or two techniques)
10 min. randori.

I have been thinking that I'd like to abandon the stretching segment (students could warm up on their own before class begins) in favour of practicing striking, centering, and sensitivity exercises. So much to do, so little time...

I follow a similar routine when teaching. Not only does it help me keep on track time-wise while teaching, it also gives a flow to the class that students pick up and start to expect. There is a lot to be said for routine in class. As Jonathan said, I also believe that when you start ad-libbing you will run out of time or forget to show some of the more basic stuff.

One important point about the very first "thing" in the regime is that I feel it should be exactly the same and all teachers should try to adhere to it as close as possible.

I believe that it is this very first part that sets the tone of the class. In our club we do exactly the same exercises every class and everyone (including the students) know the routine. If you take this in the context of classical conditioning (aka...Pavlov's dogs) then it makes sense that by doing the same thing at the beginning of every class you will gain benefit from that class - as you have before.

I'm sure that everyone has gone to a class a bit angry, or upset or frustrated at something that happens during the day, but once you start training that frustration goes away and by the end of class you feel good again. This is because you are doing something that usually makes you feel good...so that becomes the natural result to the class.

By making the first part of the regime the same every time you are quickly reinforcing this "this is how I feel in class" conditioning and are getting people to quickly be ready to train both mentally and physically.

Our club uses warm-ups to do this. I am sure the same set of strikes/kicks/whatever would accomplish the same thing...as long as it is the same in every class.

Just a thought...

--Michael