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PeterR
11-25-2004, 09:55 PM
here (http://www.time.com/time/asia/tga/article/0,13673,501041129-785426,00.html)

L. Camejo
11-25-2004, 10:16 PM
I just get all misty eyed when I see Shodokan in the media and at the top of the list too. (sniff) (sniff):p

Very good article Peter, thanks for the link. I think that article gives a pretty correct lowdown on Aikido in general and gives a few great options of training in some of the major styles in the major areas too.

Very nice.
LC:ai::ki:

happysod
11-26-2004, 02:18 AM
I'm jealous (wanders off to sniff some roses)

deepsoup
11-26-2004, 05:24 AM
Cool.

Don't worry Ian, I'm sure someone will write a nice article about aiki-fruities in London soon. :)

Sean
x

Rocky Izumi
11-26-2004, 06:53 AM
Hey Larry,

We should get something like that done for the Caribbean as well. An ed. in the LIAT Islander or BeeWee Mag would be nice. Since you are in T&T, can you look into the BeeWee Mag?

Rock

L. Camejo
11-26-2004, 07:11 AM
Wow Rock,

Now that is a BRILLIANT idea. The great part is Aikido is found on many of LIAT and BWIA's destianations as well.

Great idea. I'll look into that.

Thanks Rock.
LC:ai::ki:

Qatana
11-26-2004, 09:26 AM
I don't get it. The author starts the article by comparing apples to oranges- If yoga is for wimps I want to know in what context the author is making this comparison. One art was created in order to withstand the vigors of sitting in long periods of meditation, the other as a form of self defense.

After over thirty years of practicing yoga and two years of aikido, iu want to know where the author gets the information that aikido contributes to flexibility in any part of the body. All of the upper ranked students in my dojo are extremely physically stiff except for their ukemi,therefore ukemi does not require more than a token amount of flexibility in the back, but not even enough stretch to touch ones toes from standing.

Yoga & aikido can only complement each other, neither can be considered a substitute for the other,neither is it necessary to practice both arts in order to excel at one. So why the comparison?

Rocky Izumi
11-26-2004, 01:54 PM
If you've ever been at a Yudansha grading by Kawahara Sensei, you might consider your Aikido training as something you do in order to withstand the rigors of sitting in long periods of meditation as the gradings take place. The longest I have ever been able to hold out was about 3 hours 10 minutes or three Shodan gradings. :) And flexibility in mind and body is a sort of self-defense as well when used appropriately. I remember a story told to me many years ago about a famous calligrapher in 17th Century Japan who killed an attacker by painting a character on the person (the brush hit the correct points to kill the attacker). Who says the pen isn't mightier than the sword. The motions and activities you learn can be used in many ways depending on your proficiency in them.

Flexibiility in Aikido is very important, especially when it comes to Kaeshi-waza. Without the flexibility you may not be able to flow with the attack or technique sufficiently well to do the Kaeshi-waza when the other person is doing their technique very well with little slack. As age begins to take its toll on my flexibility, I find that I cannot do some of the Kaeshi-waza I used to do in the old days. However, I still practice to try and maintain my flexibility as much as possible.

So, definitely, Yoga and Aikido are great compliments, and nothing substitutes for another thing or they would be the same. It is only a matter of how much of one are you willing to give up so that you don't have to do both. Of course, if you have the time, definitely do both. But, my golf is important to me as well. :)

Rock

bkedelen
11-26-2004, 03:23 PM
Jo Adell: I agree completely. It is precisely this sort of pseudo-journalism that cheapens Aikido publicly, and creates more misconception than interest.

Chris Li
11-26-2004, 03:46 PM
Jo Adell: I agree completely. It is precisely this sort of pseudo-journalism that cheapens Aikido publicly, and creates more misconception than interest.

Actually, I thought that it gave a fairly accurate depiction of Aikido (within the constraints of the length of the article). The headline was a lead-in, the article did not actually (as alleged earlier in this thread) compare yoga to Aikido. What's the problem?

Best,

Chris

Qatana
11-26-2004, 06:11 PM
My point was more in alignment with what Chris is saying. I agree that the depiction of aikido was accurate- well look who is quoted in there!- but that the lead-in had nothing to do with the article.

Charles Hill
11-26-2004, 09:58 PM
What's the problem?

Because the lead in is part of the article and supposedly gives us the main point, we are to understand that yoga is for wimps and aikido is not. I agree with Benjamin, it cheapens Aikido. Other than that, it was cool to see. Way to go Peter! I also liked that it introduced non-Japanese teachers in Japan.

Charles Hill

rachel
11-26-2004, 10:42 PM
Aikido does offer a lot of flexibility to the body. Many joints get stretched (gently and over time) in Aikido, that likely wouldn't be stretched in many other activities. Also, if you already have great flexibility, it will improve your ukemi, I think. Yoga and Aikido are definitely complimentary to one another.

I think the article was poorly named. Putting down another activity isn't really necessary. I'm also disappointed to see no mention of Aikikai Hombu in Tokyo.

PeterR
11-27-2004, 01:40 AM
Well first of all the choice of title was the editors of TIME. It's not what was submitted.

Secondly I think the article both in inception and result was meant to be a relatively lighthearted intro on things to do in your spare time. I think it did that quite well.

Do a google search on Yoga Wimps before you get your underwear in a knot. I've got some serious yoga practitioners around me that have no problem with the title - or at least they can chuckle convincingly.

Aikikai Honbu why should we mention them. I missed out Yoshinkan Honbu also. They already get plenty of press. I was asked for three interesting dojos that are particularly welcoming to non-Japanese. Shodokan Honbu was a bit of a given and I find what Michael Stuemple and Peter Goldsbury doing very interesting and definitely deserving mention and support.

Its a lifestyle article not an in depth look into the art.

PeterR
11-27-2004, 04:02 AM
The idea of the title as I see it is to introduce the concept of Budo training as a form of relaxation and the removal of stress. A function more traditionally ascribed to Yoga. Again tongue in cheek.

L. Camejo
11-27-2004, 06:13 AM
Hey Peter,

I did the google search and was astonished to find the "Yoga for Wimps" tagline so popular in books, DVDs etc.

It sounds like the folks at Time may have been aware of this popular tagline and modified it for their headline on this article. Also, the article started off with an outline of Budo that may have had a rough and tumble or even painful reputation - the word they used was "belligerent". Then they went on to place Aikido in a not so extreme air as the others but well suited to those (especially those new to the martial arts) who may be put off by the other methods.

This is just my take on it. I don't think there was any attempt to portray Yoga in a negative light so much, since Yoga itself is marketed using a very similar tagline.

Just my take.
LC:ai::ki:

maikerus
11-28-2004, 04:06 AM
Shodokan Honbu was a bit of a given and I find what Michael Stuemple and Peter Goldsbury doing very interesting and definitely deserving mention and support.

Thanks Peter :)

From my point of view the article distilled a lot of information given to the author into a very short article. As I said to Peter after I had read the draft, Simon managed to skillfuly cut my 500 word masterpiece down to a sentence. <wry grin>

I think Peter is right...it's a lifestyle piece. The idea of the arcticle was just to show people that there are Aikido dojos *in different parts of Japan* that welcome non-Japanese into their ranks. And that their are non-Japanese instructors hints at the idea that other foreigners may find these places comfortable places to train.

By giving out the address and phone number of the dojos in a publication such as Time Magazine I think that we got lucky with a little bit of advertising with a bit of a tantalizing sketch of what Aikido is in the article. Hopefully it will interest enough people that we'll get a few calls and a few people joining us.

Peter...thanks again for thinking of the RYA Dojo when you were asked about this.

cheers,

--Michael

PeterR
12-02-2004, 11:34 PM
OK I finally got to see the picture but have no idea who those guys are. Notice the cloth clubs - that reminds me of a Karate teacher I studied with in Tsukuba Japan.

Definately not JAA (Tomiki).

Charles Hill
12-03-2004, 06:54 PM
Hi Peter,

What about the Shodokan Honbu is welcoming to non-Japanese? Also, why didn`t you get your own dojo`s name and address in there?

Charles

PeterR
12-04-2004, 01:26 AM
What about the Shodokan Honbu is welcoming to non-Japanese? Also, why didn`t you get your own dojo`s name and address in there?

Shodokan has several non-Japanese instructor level people and quite a high proportion of non-Japanese regular students. However, they are primarily in there because its my Home dojo and I wanted to spread the choice across styles. My group is new, taught by relatively low level instructor, and Honbu was in my mind a far better choice than my own.

Again the choice was limited. I choose my Honbu and three others that I personally found interesting. I am absolutely sure you would have chosen differently.

WW-squared
12-05-2004, 11:10 PM
I was asked for three interesting dojos that are particularly welcoming to non-Japanese. Shodokan Honbu was a bit of a given and I find what Michael Stuemple and Peter Goldsbury doing very interesting and definitely deserving mention and support.



Is there an insinuation that the Aikikai Honbu isn't particularly friendly towards foreigners? I'm planning to train there next year so any information, good and bad, would be appreciated.
Wil

PeterR
12-05-2004, 11:27 PM
Is there an insinuation that the Aikikai Honbu isn't particularly friendly towards foreigners? I'm planning to train there next year so any information, good and bad, would be appreciated.
Not at all.

Again just to be clear. I was asked to suggest a limited number of dojos. As a good Shodokan member I mentioned the Aikido dojo most relevant to my own study and a couple others that I found interesting. The author wanted Dojos in a number of cities and from a number of different styles.

One dojo from Tokyo - which one Aikikai Honbu, Yoshinkan Honbu? Besides both are already are well known. I suggested two dojos that I thought were unique - one Aikikai, one Yoshinkan. The author got a very quick response from the Yoshinkan group and besides Aikikai was covered by the Hiroshima Dojo.

As I said to Charles - if he had been in my position he might have chosen Aikikai Honbu.

You'll have a great time - I'm sure.

Charles Hill
12-08-2004, 06:20 PM
As I said to Charles - if he had been in my position he might have chosen Aikikai Honbu.

No, being the selfish bastard I am, I would have chosen my own dojo. :) I think that it was quite respectable of you to chose your Honbu over your own dojo.

As for Wil`s question, let me preface my remarks by saying that I am very happy with the Aikikai and with our Honbu. Buuuut, after reading various comments by Peter R. and Micheal S. about their respective Honbu, I sometime feel a bit disappointed that the Aikikai Honbu is not doing more in terms of relations with non-Japanese in Japan.

Charles

PeterR
12-10-2004, 01:59 AM
Charles - thanks for clearing that up - I was beginning to look at your comment cross-ways. On the note of Honbu support I think that both in my case and Micheal's the powers that be still are not quite sure what to do with us.

As far as the article it just keeps getting better and better.

About 15 years ago I left a dojo in London England and just never went back. Actually back to the city - if I had been there I would have visited. So things being what they are I lost contact with my dojo mates.

Well two of them read the Aikido article, contacted me and the guy who got me into Budo, my old Nippon Kempo sensei. Turns out the latter will be visiting Osaka next year. Kind of makes me feel all warm and fuzzy.

maikerus
12-12-2004, 09:22 PM
I saw the print version of the Time arcticle. About the same, but with a picture.

cheers,

--Michael

PeterR
12-12-2004, 09:31 PM
Someone just brought me a copy also.

It looks good but I still don't know who the guys in the picture are.

maikerus
12-12-2004, 09:52 PM
It looks good but I still don't know who the guys in the picture are.

Me neither...and I've never trained with one of those styrofoam club things (can't remember the name even though you told me the other day).

--Michael

Zato Ichi
12-12-2004, 09:56 PM
Me neither...and I've never trained with one of those styrofoam club things (can't remember the name even though you told me the other day).

Chanbara.

PeterR
12-12-2004, 10:09 PM
The guy in Tsukuba teaching me Okinawan Karate used similar batons as an extra training tool. What is in that picture is not the abomination of chanbara. Still what that group is I don't know.