PDA

View Full Version : Japan?


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


craig chapman
11-25-2004, 10:21 PM
Hi

I am a long time practitioner of the internal arts for some time now, but yearn for more knowledge! I have practiced in Aikido, Reiki, Energy Healing, Taijiquan etc

But what I really would love to do is learn Aikido in Japan!
Has anyone ideas of places or schools in Japan?

Would love to hear from anyone

Many Blessings

Craig :ai: :ki: :do:

maikerus
11-25-2004, 10:37 PM
Hi Craig,

Lots of places and lots of styles and lots of possibilities.

The crucial question is what are you looking for? Are you looking for a vacation (7-14 days), take a sabbatical and to come here for awhile (3 months? 6 months? a year?), do you want to quit your job and move here to see what might happen?

It really depends on what you are looking for and how much time/money you have.

cheers,

--Michael

saltlakeaiki
11-25-2004, 11:19 PM
But what I really would love to do is learn Aikido in Japan!Craig, I'll tell you what someone once told me... he was a teacher I knew and respected when I was just starting out many years ago, in California, although he wasn't my own sensei (and as a matter of fact he's one of your countrymen).

When I told him that I wanted to go to Japan, and by the way :) practice aikido there, he told me that I shouldn't go there expecting that I'd find something that I couldn't get from my sensei at home; that I shouldn't go there expecting that everyone would be sublimely skilled and wonderfully "aiki". I told him I understood what he was trying to tell me, but I wanted to go anyway. I did, in fact, have more reasons for wanting to go than just aikido.

So I went, and spent a number of years there. And had a great time, learned a lot, and wouldn't trade those years for anything. But he was right, as I had suspected all along. So I'd say the same thing to you: if you want to have a fantastic experience, learn to speak the language, rub elbows with some famous senseis :), and of course learn a lot of good aikido, then I heartily encourage you to go to Japan.

But if your main reason for wanting to go is that you think the aikido you'll learn there is better than what you can learn at home, you'll be wasting your time. If you're like me and want to go anyway, I may be able to give you some advice about training there. Private-message me.

Dave

maikerus
11-26-2004, 12:17 AM
Dave has a good point. As I posted in another thread a month or so ago I have seen many people come to study here for a week or a month or a year and been disappointed that the instructors are merely human and not the Gods that they want them to be.

--Michael

vsm712
11-26-2004, 02:12 AM
Hi David,

I'm practicing aikido here in the Philippines.

http://makatiaikidoclub.com/

I'd like to do the same as what you did in the near future. I'd appreciate tips and some good advice. Thanks.

Regards,
van

Craig, I'll tell you what someone once told me... he was a teacher I knew and respected when I was just starting out many years ago, in California, although he wasn't my own sensei (and as a matter of fact he's one of your countrymen).

When I told him that I wanted to go to Japan, and by the way :) practice aikido there, he told me that I shouldn't go there expecting that I'd find something that I couldn't get from my sensei at home; that I shouldn't go there expecting that everyone would be sublimely skilled and wonderfully "aiki". I told him I understood what he was trying to tell me, but I wanted to go anyway. I did, in fact, have more reasons for wanting to go than just aikido.

So I went, and spent a number of years there. And had a great time, learned a lot, and wouldn't trade those years for anything. But he was right, as I had suspected all along. So I'd say the same thing to you: if you want to have a fantastic experience, learn to speak the language, rub elbows with some famous senseis :), and of course learn a lot of good aikido, then I heartily encourage you to go to Japan.

But if your main reason for wanting to go is that you think the aikido you'll learn there is better than what you can learn at home, you'll be wasting your time. If you're like me and want to go anyway, I may be able to give you some advice about training there. Private-message me.

Dave

JJF
11-26-2004, 02:30 AM
Hi Craig.

Dave is very right - the length and purpose of your trip is essential for how you should plan it. Good planning is important - but if you are only going for a short period of time it is essential. Otherwise you will just be another tourist. Here's some of my thoughts:

I'm going to Japan next autumn when I have saved up enough to make the trip. I'll probably be there for three or four weeks and I intend it to be quite an eyeopener. Since I'm only a 1.kyu with about 7 years of aikido behind me, I am probably not going to learn much about aikido that I couldn't learn back here. After all we have both 5. and 6. dan's in this small country and being taught in you native language is a great advantage - even in aikido which in many case is 'observe and do' more than 'listen and do'.

What do I expect to get out of the trip then ? Well first of all aikido-wise I would love to get a chance to see all the great japanese senseis in my style gathered in one place which they do once a year. Secondly I expect to get a new angle on aikido after trying it in the environment were it was created.

What is essential for my trip is the fact that I have good contact that can open many doors. One of our senseis in Denmark is in Japan on a regular basis and he knows all the high-ranking senseis - that makes a lot of things easier. He is fluent in japanese as well.... something I'm working on by taking private lessons, but I have realistic expectations regarding my progress :D

In short: if you have the chance to get some contacts over there prior to the trip - hopefully through a sensei that knows you well - then it will be of great benefit for you trip. If not - you could consider contacting an exchange/cultural exchange organization such as Servas. They might be able to provide you with some contacts. Keep in mind though that it will be an entirely different trip then.

If you are going there for a longer period of time there are all sorts of things you have to consider - unless you have unlimited supply of money you will need a job - that can be difficult unless you get it from abroad. Going to Japan on a long term stay without having a job up is - so I have been told - downright impossible. Don't let me discourage you... but give some serious though on the matter of duration, finances and what you want to do while you are there.

After all - adjusting expectations to what is realistic is the key to success.

Have a nice trip if you go there - and get on the mat while you are still 'back home' - it will in no way be a waste.

maikerus
11-26-2004, 02:38 AM
He is fluent in japanese as well.... something I'm working on by taking private lessons, but I have realistic expectations regarding my progress

One thing to add if you *are* studying the language is to take the time to try and learn katakana. This is the alphabet that most foreign words are written in and it makes reading things like menus and "toilet" alot easier.

Sounds silly, but if you are studying it is worth it.

Just a thought,

--Michael

Charles Hill
11-26-2004, 03:52 AM
Hi Craig,

If you want to come for an extended period of time, you`ll probably end up teaching English unless you are fluent in the language. In that case, you`ll want to go somewhere where there are morning classes as your work will be at night. There are very few dojo like this, so I`d recommend the Honbu of your group. Other than these, John Stevens` dojo has daily morning classes, and I have heard of some dojo in Osaka that have daily morning classes.

good luck,
Charles Hill

PeterR
11-26-2004, 04:01 AM
Well Shodokan Honbu in Osaka has morning classes but it might not be exactly what the original poster is after.


I am a long time practitioner of the internal arts for some time now, but yearn for more knowledge! I have practiced in Aikido, Reiki, Energy Healing, Taijiquan etc


I'm not sure there are any dojos in the area that might satisfy those interests but ... lets not be totally discouraging.

batemanb
11-26-2004, 05:13 AM
Michael and David both have a lot of good points. Not much that I can add to what they have said. You really do need to look at what your aim is, where you intend to stay and for how long, but I can offer advice here and there if you want. I was fortunate in that I got a job in the UK that sent me over there on a one way ticket :), unfortunately also responsible for bringing me back prematurely after a couple of years :(.

I know a good dojo in Kobe that has classes throughout the day starting at 7:00. I also know a couple of good dojo's in Tokyo, these are on top of the others that people have already mentioned here such as the Aikikai, Yoshinkan and Shodokan hombu's :).

Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.

Regards

Bryan

JJF
11-26-2004, 05:48 AM
One thing to add if you *are* studying the language is to take the time to try and learn katakana. This is the alphabet that most foreign words are written in and it makes reading things like menus and "toilet" alot easier.

Sounds silly, but if you are studying it is worth it.



Hi Michael - thank's for the advice. That's what my teacher is saying - but so far I want to concentrate on speaking and understanding what is being said. Not easy with a full time job, two kids and regular aikido-practice in the schedule....

I have been looking around for a Hiragana/Katakana learning tool though. Perhaps a computer program that can dish out signs and make me answer until I get it right.... Might have to make it myself if I don't find something soon....

rachel
11-26-2004, 07:52 AM
take the time to try and learn katakana.
I second that! You can get around Japan knowing only katakana (of course, it's much easier, and more fun if you know more.)
Personally, I'm here studying at Aikikai Hombu. I'm going (as often as I can) to the 6:30 AM class taught by the Doshu. I'm a college student during the day and a English teacher at night, so it's a good schedule for me. :)

Chad Scott
11-27-2004, 08:13 AM
Your post really didn't tell us many details, but you might consider the Aikikai Hombu here in Tokyo. Lots of different practice times for regular classes as well as beginning classes.

tedehara
11-27-2004, 11:41 AM
Hi

I am a long time practitioner of the internal arts for some time now, but yearn for more knowledge! I have practiced in Aikido, Reiki, Energy Healing, Taijiquan etc

But what I really would love to do is learn Aikido in Japan!
Has anyone ideas of places or schools in Japan?

Would love to hear from anyone

Many Blessings

Craig :ai: :ki: :do:Since you're interested in the internal arts and you're planning to go to Japan to study Aikido, you should check out Ki Society HQ. at Ichikaimachi in the Tochigi prefecture.

Click Here (http://www.ki-society.or.jp/english/) for their English Homepage.

Click Here (http://www.ki-society.or.jp/english/4-4.html) for travel directions.

They have facilities for guests. They also run a Kiatsu-ho program. This is an acupressure healing system that would be a good complement to your practice of Reiki.

There are plenty of opportunities in Japan to study. Whatever your decision, "Good Luck!"