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Victor
06-05-2000, 05:24 PM
Every teacher shows a technique in different way, everyone of does a tecnique his own way.
The teachers may give different name to their techniques, but there are some basics (or should be).

My question is ashi-sabaki.
The "footwork".

I'd like to know what really is:
okuri-ashi
and
ayumi-ashi,
because everyone explains it his own way.

I'd also like to see the other ashi-sabaki used in aikido in the dictionary, even irimi-tenkan (maybe the only ashi-sabaki that's name is left with no changes as far as I know.)

[Edited by Victor on June 6, 2000 at 4:32am]

Markus
06-07-2000, 02:45 AM
Just testing the reply option and the cool aiki symbols.

I know ayumi ashi as a well balanced 'normal order' walking (one foot after the other) where your balance allways gives you the chance to cancel an intended next step.

Pooh, that's hard to describe with words even in my own language ...

:-)
Markus

SimonW11
06-08-2000, 11:37 AM
Okuriashi: a sliding step where the front foot is advanced then the rear foot brought forward to the normal Kamae/hanmi distance.
Tsugiashi a sliding step in which the rear foot is brought up close to the front then the front foot moves forward to the normal kamai/hanmi distance.

these defintions have vareid over the years.

Victor
06-08-2000, 04:19 PM
I'm taught that:

Ayumiashi is a "normal" step, for example you advance from hidarihanmi to migihanmi;

Okuriashi is a "side" step - you make two steps, not changing the hanmi;

Tsugiashi is a "small" step, you don't change the hanmi stance while making "tsugi-ashi";

Tenkaiashi is "turning around" - you make "tsugiashi", look backwards, then turn your hips;

Tenkan'ashi is "turning around with one step backwards" - you make a "tenkai-ashi" then "ayumi-ashi" backwards;

Irimi tenkan is "tenkan'ashi" after "ayumi-ashi".

But
in Aikido Tankyu #17, p.28 (Irimi), Doshu says that you enter with "Okuri ashi" (when UKE ends his attack in Gyaku-hanmi).

The way Simon wrote.

In another dojo I saw Okuriashi (what I mean about Okuriashi) called "Ayumi-ashi".

And so on.

I've also heard the word "Suriashi" or "Shuriashi" (I'm not sure which one is the correct one)
and "Kaiten-ashi"...

Oogh.

SimonW11
06-09-2000, 03:16 AM
Originally posted by Victor
I'm taught that:

Ayumiashi is a "normal" step, for example you advance from hidarihanmi to migihanmi;

Okuriashi is a "side" step - you make two steps, not changing the hanmi;

Tsugiashi is a "small" step, you don't change the hanmi stance while making "tsugi-ashi";


Nope dont follow those explanations.


I've also heard the word "Suriashi" or "Shuriashi" (I'm not sure which one is the correct one)
and "Kaiten-ashi"...

Oogh.


Kaiten ashi i seem to remember being in Kisshomaru Ueshiba's book Aikido.
as a 180 degree turn Maybe a reverse tenkan ie turning on the back foot?
I am a bit vague. however when we use the expression kaiten we are refureing to a 90 degree turn soukumen front foot move wide. back foot moves up to wher the back foot was. then turn into hanmi so the previously rear leg is now the front one.

Suriashi does not ring any bells.

there is also Yari ashi. Hmm I have sudden doubts about how one does this. Its a side waysish step do the feet cross or is that my imagination?

Simon

SimonW11
06-09-2000, 03:23 AM
never mentioned Tenchiashiwhere you move diagonaly of the line.

AikiTom
07-04-2000, 02:45 PM
Victor,
"Kaiten-ashi" in my understanding is really a combination of two ashi-sabaki moves. First, step forward in a tsugi-ashi, then perform a tenkan.
The ashi-sabaki we teach in our school are:
1) Tsugi-ashi (which sounds like your okuriashi)
2) Ayumi-ashi (natural walk)
3) Tenkai-ashi (pivoting in place and re-distributing weight)
4) Tenkan-ashi (common accepted way_
5) Kaiten-ashi as described above.

Good luck on the rest!