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Stethomas
11-13-2004, 11:30 AM
In addition to Aikido was just curious to know what everyone else here did to promote their own health, looking for tips i guess lol.

Thanks in advance...

Huker
11-13-2004, 12:43 PM
I always recommend protein. Find a good-tasting low-fat shake mix and have 1 or 2 a day. Whether or not you're building muscle doesn't really matter, just don't get something that is engineered specifically for body builders (loaded with creatine etc...). Usually a simple whey protein will do it, but there are other alternatives. Most people don't get enough protein in their usual diet. Give it a shot. You'll feel great and have constant high energy throughout the day. On top of that, your general health is likely to improve.

Like I said, just a recommendation. www.bodybuilding.com has an enormous amount of information on this sort of thing, as well as any health matters. Just run a search on the site.

Jordan Steele
11-13-2004, 03:31 PM
Running is the most superior all around exercise I suggest. It doesn't have to be long...two or three kilometers/day. A solid diet also works wonders. If you combine healthy eating, running, and Aikido that's great. If running is too much, start with walking, it has all the same benefits.

vjw
11-13-2004, 04:00 PM
I always recommend protein. Find a good-tasting low-fat shake mix and have 1 or 2 a day. Whether or not you're building muscle doesn't really matter, just don't get something that is engineered specifically for body builders (loaded with creatine etc...). Usually a simple whey protein will do it, but there are other alternatives. Most people don't get enough protein in their usual diet. Give it a shot. You'll feel great and have constant high energy throughout the day. On top of that, your general health is likely to improve.

Like I said, just a recommendation. www.bodybuilding.com has an enormous amount of information on this sort of thing, as well as any health matters. Just run a search on the site.


It is not healthy to rely on protein for substantial energy production. When a diet does not supply sufficient carbohydrate calories, the body is capable of using protein to produce energy, but it uses protein that is stored in tissues like muscle, a process known as gluconeogenisis.

For normal healthy adults, protein should account for 12% to 20% of caloric intake. For athletes, 1.2 to 1.7 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight is recommended.

As a trainer I advise clients to eat a balanced diet. If they need further help I refer them to a certified nutritionist.

Larry John
11-13-2004, 04:00 PM
Along with aikido, a hundred crunches a day and daily stretching, I've had a great deal of success with the following, all of which were suggested by my doctor:

- monitoring my basal metabolic rate (check every year or so) to determine how many calories I can take in each day and not gain weight I don't want, or lose about a pound a week if I need to (like after the holidays)

- re-tuning my calorie sources such that they're about one-third from carbs (as many of these as possible from high fiber sources like whole grains, fruits and vegetables), one third from lean protein and one third from fats. Use carbs as condiments rather than entrees, and have them with proteins and fats to avoid the insulin spikes that make you hungry every 20 minutes.

- taking three teaspoons of filtered (i.e., no heavy metals or chemicals) fish oil every day to promote vascular health (my doc says I must have the slipperiest blood vessels on the planet, as I've been doing this for the last five years).

Always check with your doc first.

Jill N
11-13-2004, 04:24 PM
Hi all:

Good balanced diet that you enjoy, exercise three or four times a week that gets you somewhat out of breath, that you enjoy, drink enough fluids (before during and after exercise) If you eat a well balanced diet, you don't need to pay for special protien supplements or vitamin pills. Laugh at least 8 times a day. (at least two of those laughs should be at yourself) Keep your funny sympathetic friends around you, discard the rest.
e ya later
Jill.

p00kiethebear
11-13-2004, 09:47 PM
Swordsmanship.

Nothing burns calories like 500 cuts in the morning and 500 before you goto bed. Using a katana makes it even harder. = )

walking. Work is weight * distance. Though running can burn more calories, it's really about how far you move your body rather than how fast.

paw
11-14-2004, 04:50 AM
Eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. Keep intake to levels that will support exercise but not body fat. Practice and train major lifts: Deadlift, clean, squat, presses, C&J, and snatch. Similarly, master the basics of gymnastics: pull-ups, dips, rope climb, push-ups, sit-ups, presses to handstand, pirouettes, flips, splits, and holds. Bike, run, swim, row, etc, hard and fast. Five or six days per week mix these elements in as many combinations and patterns as creativity will allow. Routine is the enemy. Keep workouts short and intense. Regularly learn and play new sports.

from Crossfit (http://crossfit.com/cf-info/what-crossfit.html)

Regards,

Paul

daniel chong
11-14-2004, 08:52 AM
As a naturopathic doctor, I focus a lot on diet and lifestyle changes to promote health. If you're starting in a place of decent health, and just want to get "healthier", it's really quite simple. Along with crossfit.com (Mr. Watt's recommendation above) which I strongly recommend, I would check out www.TBKfitness.com, for a lengthier discussion on the best diet to eat. I DO NOT recommend regular intake of protein shakes unless there is some reason a person won't eat meat.
Good luck!
Daniel Chong, ND
Portland, OR

Kevin Leavitt
11-14-2004, 11:43 AM
I haven't eaten meat of any kind for four years and I don't need a protein shake. I am not a small guy either. Eating properly, well balanced diet should be all you really need. I do get my blood tested from time to time, mainly for cholesterol, but also check it for iron etc. So far no issues with a well rounded diet as mentioned above (other than the meat). There are plenty of protein sources for vegetarians that don't require expensive supplements.

vjw
11-14-2004, 01:52 PM
Unless you are a speed walker, walking at speeds greater than 5 mph, the net caloric cost per mile of walking is only 50% to 60% of that for running a mile. Walking is generally less intense than jogging and there is less likelihood of muscularskeletal injury. Jogging is great for cardiorespiratory endurance and for increasing bone strength. Which ever you choose to do, start off slow then increase speed and distance gradually. Later on, try doing 1 or 2 minute intervals of walking / jogging. It will help improve recovery between times of intensive training on the mat.

Stay healthy,
Vic