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Pankration90
10-29-2004, 02:51 PM
I know you can't learn a martial art from a book and that training with an instructor is better, but it will take a long time to try all the styles that I would be interested in learning about.

Can anyone recommend a good (and affordable) book on aikido? I'm particularly interested in tomiki/shodokan or yoshinkan aikido because I want to see the techniques and their applications for fighting, and less of the philosophy.

I guess I'm kind of looking for a book that stays away from philosophy when possible and focuses on the 'martial' side of aikido.

Kevin Masters
10-29-2004, 02:57 PM
I have this book:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0870113011/ref=pd_bxgy_text_1/002-6635539-4421657?v=glance&s=books&st=*
I think Shioda Sensei was the founder of the Yushinkan variety of Aikido.

It has very nice pictures in it.

Kev.

deepsoup
10-29-2004, 06:36 PM
Can anyone recommend a good (and affordable) book on aikido? I'm particularly interested in tomiki/shodokan or yoshinkan aikido because I want to see the techniques and their applications for fighting, and less of the philosophy.
As far as Shodokan goes, the 'master work' is Tradition and The Competitive Edge (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0964708329/qid=1099092038/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/104-5695948-5083159?v=glance&s=books&n=507846) by Fumiaki Shishida and Tetsuro Nariyama. (In Japanese, its title is the rather less catchy "Aikido Classroom".)

For Yoshinkan, I'd guess the definitive work would be Gozo Shioda's Total Aikido (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/4770020589/qid=1099093107/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/104-5695948-5083159?v=glance&s=books&n=507846), although someone who knows more about Yoshinkan than I do will probably be along shortly.

Sean
x

crbateman
10-29-2004, 07:15 PM
For the Yoshinkan perspective, I can recommend the following:

"Total Aikido" by Gozo Shioda

"Aikido Shugyo" (Means Aikido Intensive Training - It's an English language book) by Gozo Shioda

"Yoshinkan Aikido - Introduction to Basics - Volumes 1 and 2" by Kioichi Inoue (Current Kancho of the Yoshinkan system)

All these books should be readily available.

That said, don't let your slant on Aikido come from a book. Get out to the dojos and experience it firsthand. And don't be overcome by the urge to compete. Your only competition should be with yourself. Aikido is about :) not about :grr:

Stick
10-29-2004, 08:48 PM
Try "Complete Aikido," by Roy Suenaka. He includes detailed discussion of aikido's practical efficacy in a "street" situation, highlighted by first-person stories of same, particularly accounts of being challenged when he opened the first successful aikido school in Okinawa. Suenaka Sensei has also studied extensively in other arts, including karate and ju-jutsu -- he continues to teach karate in addition to aikido -- and so brings a more broad martial perspective to his teaching and accounts than one who has studied aikido exclusively.

L. Camejo
10-29-2004, 10:41 PM
Hey Folks,

I'd just like to second Sean's submission of Aikido: Tradition and the Competitive Edge for Shodokan reading. Another possibility is Aikido and Randori (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1861264984/qid=1099107442/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-3858190-1725636?v=glance&s=books) by Scott Allbright of the U.K. To me this book is a good complement to the above.

For Yoshinkan, I've read both Total Aikido and Dynamic Aikido, both very good texts.

LC:ai::ki:

batemanb
10-30-2004, 03:23 AM
I don`t mean this to sound terse, but if you use the site search function for books, you should find a number of old threads on the same question, with lots of books previously listed :).

rgds

Bryan

Huker
11-02-2004, 08:59 PM
I guess Westbrook and Ratti don't get much recognition here.
Heh. ;)

L. Camejo
11-02-2004, 09:41 PM
I guess Westbrook and Ratti don't get much recognition here.
Heh. ;)

Well based on the requirements of the original regarding info on Yoshinkan/Shodokan and the martial aspects of the training, I don't think Dynamic Sphere would be a first or even a third or fourth choice for that matter.:)

Just my opinion.
LC:ai::ki:

Pankration90
11-26-2004, 01:23 PM
Thanks for the replies. :)

I've narrowed it down to the following:

"Total Aikido: The Master Course" by Gozo Shioda

"Aikido: Tradition and New Tomiki Free Fighting Method" by Nobuyoshi Higashi

"Aikido: Tradition and the Competitive Edge" by Fumiaki Shishida and Tetsuro Nariyama

I'm planning on getting two of them, does anyone have any suggestions of which two of these I should get? I wish amazon.com would let you look inside the last one.

I'm basically just looking for some insight into aikido and possibly some techniques or ideas that could be useful in grappling (I'm doing wrestling right now but when the season is over I'm moving back into BJJ/submission grappling). Wrist locks are something that I don't know much about but that I think could be useful in sub grappling (such as after a failed attempt at an arm lock when you still have control of their arm). I know there is more to aikido than wrist locks and I'd like to see that, too. Which book shows the techniques the clearest and describes them best?

Sorry Bryan, but I didn't think there would be any threads about books for shodokan/tomiki and yoshinkan so I just decided to start one.

L. Camejo
11-26-2004, 02:31 PM
Hi Phillip,

Number 1 and number 3 would be my advice. I have both.

Total Aikido gives a great layout of the Yoshinkan system and how everything from basics to techiques are done.

Tradition and the Competitive Edge is pretty much a masterpiece as far as the Shodokan stuff goes. Pretty much a parallel to what is covered Total Aikido taken from a Shodokan perspective.

LC:ai::ki: