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David_francis
09-21-2004, 05:48 AM
I'm going to try karate today to see if i like it. I already do aikido 3 times a week so i thought id try shotokan karate to see if it complimented it in certain aspects. Also i feel like I'm missing something by just doing aikido, so this will be my first ever karate lesson. Can anyone give me any tips or advice, it would be very much appreciated.

dave

SeiserL
09-21-2004, 08:29 AM
One of the gentlemen I workout with in Aikido also teaches Shotokan Karate. Many of us cross train and feel it certainly benefits our Aikido. Compliments.

Advice? Relax, breath, follow instructions, and enjoy yourself. Do not try to integrate the two. Keep them separate and let them integrate themselves as time goes by.

David_francis
09-21-2004, 11:10 AM
thanks for the info :)

David_francis
09-21-2004, 02:23 PM
I did it and loved it, very different to aikido, i even tenkanned by accident lol. But i definately want to keep it up.

Aikidoiain
09-21-2004, 03:18 PM
I did it in my teens and enjoyed it. That was my very first MA experience. It's certainly effective at teaching you various strikes. I'm sure you'll enjoy it. Good for letting off steam too!

When I did Hapkido (which has a lot of kicks), my earlier Shotokan training certainly helped. I still have a good few kicks - though I haven't got the stretch for the high ones now!

Best wishes,
Iain. :ki: :D

David_francis
10-02-2004, 04:44 PM
I've done 2 lessons now so im going to join the club on the third. I find it a lot harder than aikido funny enough.

David_francis
10-05-2004, 06:41 PM
Third lesson gone but i still havent joined, turns out its not shotokan i got it mixed up, its kyokushinkan karate, same stuff Mas Oyama did. Anyone do this style too?

batemanb
10-08-2004, 08:44 AM
Third lesson gone but i still havent joined, turns out its not shotokan i got it mixed up, its kyokushinkan karate, same stuff Mas Oyama did. Anyone do this style too?

I did this for about a year when I was 17 (about 23 years ago), trained under Steve Arneil (the chap who brought it to the UK and first western person to complete the 100 man kumite in Japan - http://www.uskyokushin.com/hanshi.htm). A friend of mine (the one who got me started back then) still trains, has just emigrated to Oz and been asked by Steve Arneil to open a dojo where he's moved too. Personally it wasn't my cup of tea, I was too wimpy back then (still am if it comes to that:D) and I really didn't have enough flexability in my legs for the kicks. It was heavy stuff in the old days, full contact, no pads and such, but my friend recently told me that it has been watered down a bit of late. They've changed their training methods a bit since I was there too. Has a good pedigree though.

regards

Bryan

David_francis
10-15-2004, 12:13 PM
Thanks bryan

suren
10-15-2004, 12:50 PM
Hi David,

I've done shotokan karate for 4 years and loved it. Had several sparings with kyokushin guys. You may find it very different from aikido (actually maybe even opposite). To my best knowledge and from my experience they work very hard to make themselves stable to attacks (kicks, strikes and pain overall) so that they usually concentrate on their own attack and block only vital and dangerous ones. Back to the times I was trained (12 years ago) karate overall was physically very demanding and I would expect kyokushinkan to be even more demanding than shotokan (which does not rely so
much on your physical abilities as kyokushinkan). Of cource that if they train seriously not the fitness style :)

The weakest point in karate for me is that they don't train to get out of the line of attack, but instead try to block or even just ignore the attack. Keep in mind that with time everybody's physical shape goes down and being 80 years you probably can't ignore or block the attack of a younger and stronger person. But that complimentary training will give you more knowledge about strikes and kicks (if you have a good sensei).

Just my thoughts,
Suren.

suren
10-15-2004, 12:53 PM
Oh, and forgot to say, they are very tough guys and usually can beat a person of other karate school with the same experience (usually, but not always). I lost one sparring and won the other one only because I was able to break the opponent's timing. Both guys were more experienced than me.

CNYMike
10-16-2004, 10:22 PM
..... The weakest point in karate for me is that they don't train to get out of the line of attack, but instead try to block or even just ignore the attack. .....

Depends on what style you do, I guess. When I started shito-ryu in 1985, the first class of the club after the seven week regular class, Sensei Gordon explained blocking and stepping back at a 45 degree angle. It gets you off the line, makes the block easier, and leaves you closer to a counter attack. When I went to the Cornell dojo, Sensei Ed Ferraro continued that theme. In fact, we did one steps involving pivoting out of the way and doing an inward black. So when Sensei Jim Wallace introduced tenkan when I started Aikido in 1986, I had no problem with it, much to his shock/amazement.

Since taking over the Cornell dojo, Sensei Mike Eschenbrenner has gone even farther with these ideas, inventing bunkai that focus on joint locks and throws. Of course, all these ideas are extremely difficult to put into practice when you do freestyle sparring because your natural instinct is to retreat -- big mistake. But that is what he focuses on. And I ***THINK**** he's trained with the Cornell Aikido club, but I'm not sure of that.

On the other hand, we've had at least one visiting sensei who pretty much stood his ground and did everything right in front of him, which drove my sensei crazy because he is very much one for getting off the line on the assumption that your attacker is bigger than you. We also had a Japanese(?) girl with us last year who kept standing her ground and wanting to do the throws full speed. Not good when you're learning it, trust me. Then AGAIN, I know that the Shotokan people affiliated with Kanazawa Sensei practice ippon kumite and jiyu-ippon kumite (one-step sparring with both partners in fighting stance) that involves evading to different angles. Then ****AGAIN****, I never did kyokushinkai, so I don't know one way or the other where Mas Oyama is on the issue of footwork/evasion. :o

So the bottom line is that IMHO it's an overgernaization to say karateka don't get off the line. Some styles do, but other styles do not. It depends on which one you get into, I guess.


.... But that complimentary training will give you more knowledge about strikes and kicks (if you have a good sensei).

Just my thoughts,
Suren.


Absolutely; the same if you cross-trained in anything else. My one peice of advice would be that instead of going there looking for something, stick with it and see what it gives you. If that makes any sense.

With respect ....

Mas Mike