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View Full Version : Yikes, someone seemingly immune to pain!


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The Molinjir
09-13-2004, 06:41 PM
I have been doing Aikido for a bit, but a few days ago I met a fellow, around 17, who offered to let people do wrist locks, elbow locks, nerve center strikes (excepting neck) and even knee him in the groin?

I watched a number of people of varying skill do these things, and it seemed that he did not even feel it? He might be an extremely good faker, but I know some of the people involved, and they have fairly strong technique.

*Note: this was out of the dojo, a group of friends of mine, when this guy offered it. Only two of us take Aikido, but we all take MA of sorts.

Does anyone know anyone like this?

~Molinjir

shihonage
09-13-2004, 06:48 PM
I'm afraid you were a witness to the beginning of the zombie invasion.

Jill N
09-13-2004, 07:02 PM
Sounds a bit familiar.......Dave?

%^}

e ya later
Jill.

The Molinjir
09-13-2004, 08:16 PM
Zombie invasion? Hardly. Do I detect sarcasm?
He claims it is due to fighting a massive amount since he was four, but I sincerely doubt it.

I am just wondering, is this possible, or is he a good actor?

Devin McDowell
09-13-2004, 08:33 PM
Its possible. There are Asian monks who can take groin kicks with just a wince (I think) and people can walk across live coals (confirmed), so I'm sure its possible, even if your friend does just have iron self-control.

Richard Elliott
09-13-2004, 08:37 PM
Some of the inmates in the Texas Dept of Corr can do some really weird stuff as far as pain tolerance goes. I have heard some stories and saw a guy snap handcuffs like plastic. A little unsettling. People can do that kind of stuff.

The Molinjir
09-13-2004, 09:05 PM
Yeah, so far, to the best of anyone who knows him, the only ways to make him feel pain are a blow directly under the jaw (near the nerve center located there) or to use a jump kick, or a hard punch in the right spot. The amusing thing is, he has very little skill actually in fighting, mock or reality.

Hmm, but he is not into the Ki stuff or anything....
I have also seen Shaolin Monks, break swords over their chest's, balance on spears, handstands with finger-tips. A four-foot child doing gymnastics an olympic quality gymnast would be proud of, and finally, a breaking of a log, massive, oak beam, about as large around as a football player's neck.

I wonder how he does it with no training wahtsoever....

ian
09-14-2004, 03:45 AM
In a fights most people are quite immune to pain. It is very useful to have someone who is immune to pain in the dojo since it illustrates that really only a mechanical advantage and blending works for a serious attack.

I know sumo wrestlers used to train to retract their testicles, however it does suprise me that he can take a strike in the groin. Wu Chi (Kung Fu) does tend to do a lot of condition training to protect the body from these types of strikes. What about a strike to the base of the skull? I think he may object to that as well. Also a nerve centre strike just about 1 1/2 inches above the nipple can be hard to be resistant to (downward strike) - the more muscley the better. Also, does this mean he will let you strike him in the temple or use nerve points on the face (or behind the ear)? Sounds like an ideal person to practise nerve strikes on!

Maybe he does chi gung or something similar. Although some nerve strikes are pain, some are physiological (i.e. on his neck and jaw). What about the floating ribs; maybe I'm getting too interested in this!

DaveO
09-14-2004, 06:43 AM
Sounds a bit familiar.......Dave?

%^}

e ya later
Jill.

LOL! Knew that was coming. ;)
Experience and high tolerance, yes. Immune - far from it.
Which is a good thing - but you know what they say about 'too much of a good thing.....' ;)

Ian wrote:
I know sumo wrestlers used to train to retract their testicles, however it does suprise me that he can take a strike in the groin.
Hell - if I knew a shot was coming at my groin; I wouldn't need to train to retract 'em - they'd be crawling right up me bloody throat!!!! :D :D :D

markwalsh
09-14-2004, 09:31 AM
Met a few people who seem to not feel much pain. Some can even do it sober.

Shouldn't make any difference to your Aikido though right? Yonkyo, nikkyo etc, work if done corectly, without uke having to feel pain (although ithis is normally a fun side effect).

Mark
x

Lyle Laizure
09-14-2004, 10:52 AM
There is at least one in every dojo. Ask your sensei how to adjust to this flexibility.

Don_Modesto
09-14-2004, 12:22 PM
I met a fellow, around 17, who offered to let people do wrist locks, elbow locks, nerve center strikes (excepting neck) and even knee him in the groin?

I watched a number of people of varying skill do these things, and it seemed that he did not even feel it? ...

Does anyone know anyone like this?

http://www.muchosucko.com/video-asiantreecatching.html

George S. Ledyard
09-14-2004, 10:08 PM
http://www.muchosucko.com/video-asiantreecatching.html
Don, You need to get a life, buddy! Where do you find this stuff?

maikerus
09-15-2004, 03:23 AM
As Mark said, if done "right" there doesn't need to be pain.

When I was training in Canada one of the top Yoshinkan ranked non-Japanese came as an assistant to one of the Yoshinkan Hombu instructors - I can't remember which clinic, but it would have been before 1993 in Ontario someplace.

In any event, he used a friend of mine as uke in nikajo and my friend kept dropping to the mat and then apologizing because he went down. The problem was that there was no pain but he still dropped to the mat. He thought that this was because he was moving before the instructor had applied the technique, but actually the instructor applied the technique without causing pain. I think it took him 3 drops to the mat to figure out what was going on.

Interesting, eh?

cheers,

--Michael

George S. Ledyard
09-15-2004, 11:03 AM
As Mark said, if done "right" there doesn't need to be pain.

When I was training in Canada one of the top Yoshinkan ranked non-Japanese came as an assistant to one of the Yoshinkan Hombu instructors - I can't remember which clinic, but it would have been before 1993 in Ontario someplace.

In any event, he used a friend of mine as uke in nikajo and my friend kept dropping to the mat and then apologizing because he went down. The problem was that there was no pain but he still dropped to the mat. He thought that this was because he was moving before the instructor had applied the technique, but actually the instructor applied the technique without causing pain. I think it took him 3 drops to the mat to figure out what was going on.

Interesting, eh?

cheers,

--Michael

Most people do their wrist locks as "pain" techniques. This works until you find someone who doesn't feel the pain (as in law enforcement applications).

Use Ikkyo as the fundamental technique of Aikido and remember what Yamaguchi sensei said about "No technique should require more effort than the weight of your arms resting on the partner's body." If you look at nikkyo when it is done just as a wrist crank you see the nage crank the technique into the uke and the uke will fall away from the nage. When it is done as an ikkyo variation, you position the wrist against the shoulder and move your body in such a way that you are subtly on top of the wrist, you run your energy up the back side of your body rather than forward towards the partner. He will go down and it won't necessarily hurt at all. The nikkyo catches the whole body, not just the wrist. You can tell if you are doing this because the uke will fall towards you rather than away from you. This is more martial as well because they fall right into the atemis you can run.

Don_Modesto
09-15-2004, 02:39 PM
Don, You need to get a life, buddy! Where do you find this stuff?

I'm on email lists of folks who have no lives. It comes to me unbidden.

Disciples
09-16-2004, 01:22 PM
To the guy who said he saw the Shalion Monks do that stuff...and has the friend immune to pain have you ever considered maybe this guy is superman? Maybe those monks are actually supermen in disguise or something. Or maybe youve been watching alot of television and thought you actually saw this happen. If you did for real, can you direct me to the place where you saw all of this?

Disciples
09-16-2004, 01:26 PM
Hell - if I knew a shot was coming at my groin; I wouldn't need to train to retract 'em - they'd be crawling right up me bloody throat!!!! :D :D :D

Dude...the thought of testicles being retracted and going up throats...its pretty damn disgusting. How about we use some of that good ol' Aikido and avoid this kick to the groin and render the attacker harmless...so nobody will be kicked in the groin

The Molinjir
09-17-2004, 06:08 PM
In response to Chris: No sarcasm needed. The Shaolin Monk demonstration, I got into due to having a friend who is decently high up in Kenpo (3rd dan). His dojo had set something up with the Shaolin monks, and (I know, this sounds odd) he was able to travel to china, with his group, and do a number of seminars with the Monks. Later, after he returned, he and his dojo were invited to a demonstration, taking place in California, and I managed to get in with him. The things that I saw were amazing, and obviously not tricks.

~Molinjir

disabledaccount
09-17-2004, 06:59 PM
This video:

http://www.martialartsmart.net/tc-ca105.html

And this video:

http://www.martialartsmart.net/prjt001.html

Both demonstrate monks do what they call "hard QiGong".

frivolouspig
09-24-2004, 09:31 AM
This video:

http://www.martialartsmart.net/tc-ca105.html

And this video:

http://www.martialartsmart.net/prjt001.html

Both demonstrate monks do what they call "hard QiGong".


LMAO, "IRON CROTCH" thats a good one, :p

as for pain it really comes down to how the nerves in your body communicate with your brain, if they don't function properly or at all the you would have an immunity to it, although feeling no pain at all is a bad thing.
here (http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/state/minnesota/8396656.htm?1c) [news article] is an example of what happens when you feel no pain at all.

Shane Mokry
10-02-2004, 09:45 PM
Pain should have ABSOLUTELY nothing to do with your aikido techniques.

Shane

disabledaccount
10-03-2004, 09:04 AM
Perhaps pain should have nothing to do with your Aikido. Pain is an inevitable feature of life. Learning to manage that pain is an integral part of my Aikido practice. Included in the study are the skills of inflicting and recieving pain.