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Nathan Richmond
03-09-2001, 04:08 PM
What kind of weight training/fitness program does everyone follow? I follow the "Body-for-LIFE program which I really like for a few reasons.

1. The "High Points" or Level 10's are really intense and make you really focus on your mind and not your physical body to lift the weight.

2. I like the quick, intense workouts of the program. They don't take a lot of time out of your day.

I used to be the type that counted calories and tried to powerlift, but I have learned that BFL can really not only help your body but your mind also. Sort of a similarity with Aikido.

What does everyone else do? Or nothing?

-nate

http://www.bodyforlife.com

Erik
03-09-2001, 05:07 PM
You will hate me for what I am about to say. I'm am woefully unimpressed with that program. Intensity counts but it doesn't really count the way he says it does. Particularly in regards to running. I also think he's switched the before and after pictures around or he supplies free steriods. I've never seen someone achieve that type of growth in 12 weeks. I can't even begin to imagine it. Otherwise, his is just a standard weight program.

But the dude has sold more books than god this year and last so who am I to say.

Personally, I use the basic exercises and I've structured them so that I can get through a workout in under an hour (I agree with him there). I don't do anything fancy whatsoever and I only do 3 sets, fairly low reps and I'm out.

I'm pretty much out of the weight game however. My shoulder just keeps getting reinjured when I lift. And I need a good shoulder for aikido.

Nathan Richmond wrote:
What kind of weight training/fitness program does everyone follow? I follow the "Body-for-LIFE program which I really like for a few reasons.

1. The "High Points" or Level 10's are really intense and make you really focus on your mind and not your physical body to lift the weight.

2. I like the quick, intense workouts of the program. They don't take a lot of time out of your day.

I used to be the type that counted calories and tried to powerlift, but I have learned that BFL can really not only help your body but your mind also. Sort of a similarity with Aikido.

What does everyone else do? Or nothing?

-nate

http://www.bodyforlife.com

Octavio
03-09-2001, 06:39 PM
I agree there's no way one can achieve those results in 12 weeks. I've been building for awhile to the point were I have the results in the book but it took me about 8 months. I try to build to the extent that it won't affect my flexibility in aikido. I agree with the one hour intensity which is what I do. However I break it up a little more. One day I'll do chest, shoulders, quads, calves, next day bicep, tricep, back, hamstring. Next day start over. 6 sets each muscle using pyramid sets and using periphery heart action type of routine. This increased my endurance and overall muscle mass.

Usagi
03-11-2001, 11:32 AM
First, i would like to apologize for not using technical terms in english(for english is not my native language).

Body for life, by Phillips, Bill

Phillips method works.
And it works fast, no doubt about.

Although i believe that some of the results came from the associated use of steroids i would like to remind you that steroids don't work alone, they maximize the result of the workouts(at a cost).

What most people who criticize Phillip's method don't realize is why it "works" and why it is not healthy.

1. Why it "works":

The method is being used around the world, by millions of people.
These people are attracted by both the promise of a perfect body and the chance of winning prizes.
Now, get one million people to try to do something right and at least a hundred will succeed(even if out of coincidence).

A hundred out of a million it's not so impressive (0,01%), but it is enough to fill a book with very inspiring photos.

If you read carefully the interviews presented in the book (and watch closely the "before"/pictures) you will see that these "miracles" had good bone structure and a past history in sports(football, swimming...).

They just needed to burn fat and rebuild muscle tonus!

A proteic diet will burn fat extremely fast and will help to build up muscles.

"...the quick, intense workouts of the program" stimulate hipertrophy.

If you have a huge large fat guy, underneath the fat you have very strong muscles (they're there, you just can't see them), otherwise he wouldn't be able to move. Burn the fat and you got mister olympia.

2.Why it is not healthy!

This is the part you are all waiting for, neh? :)

First, our kidneys work filtering blood through a net of capilaries.
Big cells like aminoacids(that compound the proteins) are too big to move through the membrane of the capilaries and cause small ruptures.

A hiperproteic diet will cause damage to the kidneys.

Also the liver will have to work "double shift" to deal with so much protein and will present mal-functions.

"The diet sucks, but you said that the exercises are okay, right?"

Wrong!

"...the quick, intense workouts of the program" are perfect for THE MUSCLES.

But our motor system is not just about muscles.

Muscles are connected to bones through tendons.

Muscles adapt very fast. Tendons may take years and bones decades.

Try to think of your arm as a fishing rod.

You have the rod, the line, the hook and the fish.

If you pull the fish fast and strong he'll come out of the water faster, right?

Maybe not.

Depending on the fish, and the equipment, the hook may cut the fish's mouth, the line may break, the rod may break, your hand may slip, you may fall into the water...

When you expose your muscles to quick, intense workouts, they force the tendons and, as the tendons are not elastic (they resemble the rubber used in some tanto, not plastic bands, force them and they will deform or even crack).
These kind of stress may cause them to lose the fit of the joint socket or the muscle insertion.

As long as you are young and keep your muscle tonus, no problem.

But with age or lack of exercise joint problems will start to appear.

That's why you must not start weight training/fitness at level 10 right from the begining.

The first months are for your joints(your whole body) to get ready for what is coming.

These are my arguments.

Any feedback will be extremely welcome (the more input the better!)

My opinion is that we should avoid trying to walk the fast track and gain fast results.

And, specially in the case of martial arts, remember always to do stretching(and work the full extesion of moviment) in order not to lose flexibility.

Best wishes!

Renato Usagi

Nathan Richmond
03-11-2001, 01:10 PM
I do not believe there is any conclusive medical reports that have proven that higher protein diets cause liver damage. Although some reports say that it may cause osteoprorosis.

Secondly, I do believe that the muscles do adapt to the workout over time, however, you can tweak the program to force the muscles to adapt.

Lastly, I have done the program and gotten great results. Probably one of the only programs I have done where I have only lost a minimal amount of muscle mass while trying to lose fat at the same time. I believe that most of the negativity associated with Body for Life is the people who can't handle the workouts.

-nate

Sam
03-12-2001, 09:20 AM
Nathan Richmond wrote:

What does everyone else do? Or nothing?

-nate

http://www.bodyforlife.com

I do good old fashined circuit training or interval circuits to help with randori.
I also do about a million sword cuts every week.
I used to do a lot of weights, but now I find I haven't got the energy with all the training....

ian
03-12-2001, 09:32 AM
I used to do circuit training - but its hard to get one that is streneous enough where I am. Instead I do running , rowing (about 6 miles) and weights for specific muscles.

At the moment I'm trying to change my excercise pattern as I'm getting heavier and bigger muscle but loosing 'strength'. May sound strange, but when I just did circuits I had a lot more control over my body as one whole unit whereas weight training is all about isolating muscles and getting to get them work as inefficently as possible - a bad habit for your body.

Weight gain can also decrease the speed at which you move your body (purely an inertia thing), which is vital in aikido.

Therefore I think stamina excercies where you have body co-odination involved is useful, along with circuit training.

Obiously, if your doing weight training for aikido you are also doing lots of weapons practise (to build correct muscles - many sports physiologists are now saying that unless you build up the core muscles (internal and trunk muscles) the body won't support the maximum use of other muscles, such as biceps.

Additionally I have started Chi Kung - though I've just begun I am noticing a difference in my real 'dynamic' strength (i.e. my whole body moving to maximise a force).

Ian

Chris P.
03-12-2001, 12:41 PM
Nathan Richmond wrote:
What kind of weight training/fitness program does everyone follow?

I hit a sandbag for 10-60 minutes, hold low stances for 15 minutes to 2 hours, and/or practice standing still for 30 minutes to 1 hour, as time permits.

I don't care about building muscle anymore. I've been beaten by too many smaller, slower, weaker people.

mle
03-12-2001, 02:23 PM
I have done some sort of supplemental exercise along with aikido for about 7 years now. Mostly weights and cardio, and I have done construction, farm, and kennel work.

I am also a massage therapist who specializes in the needs and quirks of budoka.

Yes, Virginia, there IS documented evidence that too much protein in the diet causes kidney problems, not to mention problems with estrogen and calcium metabolism in women. My nutritionist friend thinks it detrimental, and while I do like a bit of protein at every meal, I don't need to focus on that. It's all about balance, and anything attempting to charge you for varieties of extremism is to be avoided.

I am a great advocate of staying fit, but not in the context of looking like Bill Phillips.

My goal is to be able to play longer, hike longer, train longer, live longer.
Uber-athletes tend not to live as long as those who train in moderation. And those who don't train at all face muscular degeneration, depression and obesity.

The average person benefits from brisk walks or bike rides and, for the ambitious or the recovering from an injury, light weights.

I do agree that "core training" is vital and spend my time on the physioball weekly.

I work hard on flexibility and do gentle, sane shoulder strengthening exercises (hi Eric!).

I don't buy anybody's Super New Fad Program, sorry. Go to the Y, read some less faddish and more practical books on how to be healthier and stronger, take up yoga, learn to use and enjoy your body.

And while you're at it, get a massage.
;-)

Emily

Kami
03-13-2001, 05:36 AM
mle wrote:
I don't buy anybody's Super New Fad Program, sorry. Go to the Y, read some less faddish and more practical books on how to be healthier and stronger, take up yoga, learn to use and enjoy your body.

KAMI : Excellent, concise, clear...Congratulations, Emily!

And while you're at it, get a massage.
;-)

KAMI : Humm...Isn't that a "shameless plug"? ;)

Best

Guest5678
03-13-2001, 07:05 AM
I've weight trained for various activities throughout my life, and I'll continue to do so because I believe muscles and tendons etc... are better maintained that way. It's part of my overall health program and not a goal of doing better Aikido technique. No doubt it helps, but that is not the goal of my weight training. In fact, I've spent many hours on the mat learning to use as little muscle/energy as possible and still execute technique properly. This is still very hard for me and I have to work at it all the time. I believe the only weight training that is of real use in Aikido are legs, hips and abs type programs. Those programs help form a very solid base to work from.

Also, over the years I've realized that big muscles make great atemi targets! You gotta love those bodybuilders, they're always willing to show you the targets!

-Dan P. - Mongo

PM
03-14-2001, 03:31 PM
Hello all,

I couldn't help but respond to this particular discussion. I am a former competitive bodybuilder turned martial artist. When I quit bodybuilding to begin studying martial arts, i was 5'6" and 185lbs. I couldn't understand why I had such a tough time keeping up with my much older and smaller sensei. So I sat down and developed a new weight training strategy that would work better for my martial arts. It is pretty simlpe, it is a matter of doing some aroebics 20-30 mins. and then a weight training routine that used high reps, low weight and lots of stretching. I also worked very hard to develop my reflexes, punching and kicking drills for speed. My sensei was quite impressed with my speed and endurance and how much better my fighting skills were as a result of this routine.

The key is to remember that each one of us is different, what works for me, may not work for all. Experiment with different excercises, running sprints, circuit training etc. I have learned that doing a tough leg routine the day before we do a lot of shikko, can be a painful mistake.

I don't believe in fad diets or books. Use your common sense, I like a higher protein to carb diet. It makes me feel good, not so run down, but if your body responds to a different diet, then more power to you. Educate yourself and play with new ideas, it's the only way you will learn what's best for you....

Pete