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Jerry Miller
08-29-2004, 10:21 PM
Let's assume that you were the runner that was attacked in the Men's Marathon. If you did not see the attack it was a mad defrocked priest running at the lead Marathon runner with both arms up in the air (while wearing a kilt). He wrapped up the lead runner in his arms and basically swept the runner of the track into the crowd. Bystanders separated them and the runner continued on to the bronze. What sort of technique would enable you to get rid of the threat and continue with your run. My thought was ducking or using a kokyunage. The difficult part I think would be keeping or regaining your running rhythm. What are your thoughts? :triangle: :square: :circle:

DaveO
08-30-2004, 03:15 AM
Fresh; just about anything; but come on - De Lima was exhausted; his body completely spent - he'd already run around 22-23 miles. Also; he was in the runner's headspace; totally inner-directed. The aforementioned fruitcake was fresh, hyped and nuts; with no sense of personal safety (this was the same f*ckwit that ran out onto Silverstone during the British Grand Prix); and it was a surprise attack. If there's 10 people on the planet that could've successfully defended themselves under those circumstances; I'd like to meet them.

All that aside; I just want to offer my total and unreserved admiration for Vanderlei de Lima - after a crushing incident like that; crossing the line the way he did? What wonderful class! (applause!)

shihonage
08-30-2004, 05:13 AM
An intermediate-or-above level Aikido student will just do whatever this flows into.

The exact distribution of power and intent at that moment could only be accurately identified by the victim himself, so outside speculation is useless.

markwalsh
08-30-2004, 05:53 AM
Lift up kilt. Embarrass. Continue :blush:

paw
08-30-2004, 06:45 AM
De Lima was exhausted; his body completely spent - he'd already run around 22-23 miles.

Exactly. I doubt more than a handful of people on this board can run a 2:30 marathon, much less try and defend themselves from any attack after 22 miles.


All that aside; I just want to offer my total and unreserved admiration for Vanderlei de Lima - after a crushing incident like that; crossing the line the way he did? What wonderful class! (applause!)

Absolutely. A great performance by an incredible athlete. Extremely inspiring.

Regards,

Paul

Nick Simpson
08-30-2004, 06:57 AM
Kick the Sh*t out of him.

David_francis
08-30-2004, 08:00 AM
I've done my best aikido when im exhausted.

Jordan Steele
08-30-2004, 10:50 AM
Headbutt square in the nose and then run over the body. What an ass****! I would never give some loser like that the comfort of an aikido technique, I would bust him.....BAD!

DaveO
08-30-2004, 12:01 PM
I've done my best aikido when im exhausted.

True; so have I.
However; not to labour the point but when was the last time you did aikido right after running a 2:30 marathon on one of the toughest tracks in the world? :confused:
There's exhausted and then there's exhausted - even if fit and leading an active lifestyle; very few of us push ourselves that far; that hard. What we term totally exhausted is generally the point where a top-level marathon runner is just getting warmed up.

Tatiana
08-30-2004, 12:44 PM
Me???? Probably let him carry me off the track, bewildered and confused, but too exausted to do any thingI can't even run 4 miles, imagine..... LOL! :D

Tat

ajbarron
08-30-2004, 01:23 PM
I do aikido and it is not anything like the physical exhaustion that a runner at this level would be feeling at that point in this event. Every activity is unique and specific to the sport. The exhaustion alone, with the sudden shot of adrenaline and breaking of focus, would be devistationg to anyone. His center was lost.

I have also run marathons and well as participated in other endurance sports. What happened was an incredible demonstration of spirit that you might ever see in the Olympics. (By the way I've been to two Olympics as an athlete and two as a coach).

The course in Athens was brutal, the heat was incredible and "The" effort was Olympian.

What would anybody have done is a moot point. What the runner did with it was inspirational.

The Brazilian's entry into the stadium and his tribute to the crowd brought tears to my eyes. He showed appreciation for the spectators he was smiling he had over come what would have made most athletes simply sit down and cry.

Nacho_mx
08-30-2004, 01:38 PM
Actually not resisting at all (thatīs what he did) eventually enabled him not to get hurt initially, escape unscathed and return to the race with enough strenght and will to place 3rd. Cheers to him and poo on the loon.

DaveO
08-30-2004, 01:46 PM
(By the way I've been to two Olympics as an athlete and two as a coach).

The course in Athens was brutal, the heat was incredible and "The" effort was Olympian.

What would anybody have done is a moot point. What the runner did with it was inspirational.

The Brazilian's entry into the stadium and his tribute to the crowd brought tears to my eyes. He showed appreciation for the spectators he was smiling he had over come what would have made most athletes simply sit down and cry.

Wow - you're the Andrew Barron that used to coach Susan Auch, IIRC? (Speed skating - in particular tall, statuesque Canadian female speed skaters - fan here. ;) )Kewl!
You might be interested; my dojo is in Club Olympia; the judo facility in Kitchener owned and run by fmr. Judo Olympian and coach Wayne Erdman. It's always a pleasure to meet - let alone be trained by - an Olympian. My respects, Sir. :)

I agree - I had tears in my eyes as well at his magnificent finish - not one person in ten thousand has class like that. :)