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Olivia_S
08-15-2004, 03:39 AM
What other exercise, if any, do you guys do?

Before starting Aikido I was going to the gym 2-3 times a week doing weight classes and rpm (which is a bike class).

I say this out of vanity because I worked pretty hard to get myself into shape and I don't want to start going backwards!

I'm finding it hard to make it to the gym since I've started Aikido, as firstly it's not something I have ever particular enjoyed (especially compared to Aikido!), and finding the time can be difficult.

What do you recommend for exercise in addition to Aikido to maintain muscle definition and general fitness?

Thanks,
Olivia

shihonage
08-15-2004, 03:45 AM
I do push-ups daily.

Tried starting running several times, with no success.

ruthmc
08-15-2004, 03:56 AM
I do archery - it's great!

I'm one of those people who gets bored doing gym work or weights :)

Ruth

paw
08-15-2004, 06:56 AM
What do you recommend for exercise in addition to Aikido to maintain muscle definition and general fitness?

I'd consider a body-weight workout --- these can be quick, effective and require little if any equipment, so you needn't travel to the gym. There are several examples of these at SCRAPPER (http://trainforstrength.com/workouts.shtml) website (start with Round and Round or Workout 1).

If you still bike, consider interval training, an example of the protocal is also at SCRAPPER's site, under Taku's Interval Training. Interval training is adaptable to nearly any activity...walking, running, swimming, jumping rope, biking...just adapt the protocal to the activity.


Regards,

Paul

Chris Birke
08-15-2004, 07:47 AM
Paul, those workouts are excellent, and are precisely what I do. That said, I can't see any of my non nhb oriented friends doing them. Most can barely do a pull up.

This isn't a fault of the workouts above, but I think people here are looking for a more moderate cardio and weightloss oriented approach to accompany their Aikido.

(in an entirely different discussion, if all Aikido mats began with 30 minutes focused on high intensity interval training the Aikido vs ? debate would probably cease to exist)

adwelly
08-15-2004, 09:43 AM
I find that half an hour of heavyhands a day does the job. I've been doing this for years from the Leonard Schwarz books, but until recently there's been very little on the web about this exercise method. Google reveals http://www.heavyhandsfitness.com however.

SeiserL
08-15-2004, 10:52 AM
I like to run and skip rope. I also lift and do heavy bag work. Push-ups and crunches. Then I have the physical therapy rehab stabilization exercises for my neck, shoudlers, back, and knees.

giriasis
08-15-2004, 01:06 PM
I would skip the gym, too. But I agree that you can still workout at home -- no matter the intensity you choose. In addition to aikido 4 times a week I'm doing 6 workouts using at home workouts. I use a video series called "The FIRM" which combines aerobics and weight training. These videos equate to circuit training or PHAT (pheripheral heart action training). They added weights to aerobics back in the '80s well long before the aerobic "sculpting" classes you find in your gym today. They have over 40 different videos and you can mix and match so that you don't get bored and your body doesn't get accostomed to just one workout. The newer videos are out in Target but the older ones from the late '80s and early '90s are the best and hardest.

This method has definently helped my aikido not just in losing weight but also by strengthening my body and improving my flexibility but also in especially developing my core muscles which gives me a strong center instead of just having a heavy center.

paw
08-15-2004, 05:52 PM
Paul, those workouts are excellent, and are precisely what I do. That said, I can't see any of my non nhb oriented friends doing them. Most can barely do a pull up.

Good Point. As printed, the workouts can seem very intimidating.

Scrapper suggests doing half the reps of the easiest version of the workout and then adjusting from there.


(in an entirely different discussion, if all Aikido mats began with 30 minutes focused on high intensity interval training the Aikido vs ? debate would probably cease to exist)

LOL! I doubt that. However, I honestly believe it would improve everyone's aikido and greatly reduce injuries suffered in training.


Let me echo's Anne's advice as The Firm as another alternative to the gym. While I've not seen nor used The Firm, based on what Anne has posted in the past, it seems like a well balanced, thought out approach. (Anne, forgive me, I didn't remember your name until you posted).


Regards,

Paul

Jeanne Shepard
08-15-2004, 06:23 PM
Dancing is good, and fun, and a mice break from the martial art scene.

Jeanne

Lyle Laizure
08-15-2004, 10:43 PM
I know one of the big things here, though you don't find to many men doing it is belly dancing.

shihonage
08-16-2004, 02:16 AM
Dancing is good, and fun, and a mice break from the martial art scene.

Jeanne

I do hope mice never get into the martial art scene, they can be enough trouble as it is.

Clayton Drescher
08-16-2004, 03:26 AM
Fairly regularly, Sensei will interrupt class about halfway through and have us all hit the mat and do about 100 crunches of various types, with pushups to add variety. Lately its been a much more regular occurance, 2 or 3 times a week, but the schedule's changed and he teaches more these days. A few of us kickbox pretty regularly too, that's a better workout than aikido often is.

MadMyndi
08-16-2004, 02:08 PM
I swim a mile two to three times a week, run, use excersise machines, lift weights, and hula hoop with a weighted hoop. Of all of it, I find the swimming and the running to be the most helpful to me in Aikido; both require me to keep a rhythm, which helps me think about flow. I find that if I do a light 30-45 minute workout before class, I'm less likely to get injured, and my techniques flow better.

siwilson
08-16-2004, 05:22 PM
Solo Practice!!!

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?p=77927#post77927

It is invaluable!!!!!

Keith R Lee
08-16-2004, 06:00 PM
Running, 30 min x 3 a week.
Progressive load weight lifting, x 3 a week.

Devon Natario
08-16-2004, 08:00 PM
Olivia-
I personally work out with weights (3 X a week), run (1-3 miles 2 X a week) and do Jujitsu (2x a week) on top of Aikido 4x a week). In my spare time this summer I also wakeboard, ski, and do solo practice of Modern Arnis.

When I first started Aikido (5 months ago) I stopped working out for awhile too. It was hard to do everything, but once you get in a pattern, it will be easy to do for you.

I wish you luck.

Jeanne Shepard
08-16-2004, 08:23 PM
If you're a guy, and tired of the fact that men outnumber women in dojos, try dancing. Its just the opposite, and women love men who can dance, or at least make the effort.

Jeanne
( a woman who loves men who dance) :p

xuzen
08-17-2004, 02:22 AM
If you're a guy, and tired of the fact that men outnumber women in dojos, try dancing. Its just the opposite, and women love men who can dance, or at least make the effort.

Jeanne
( a woman who loves men who dance) :p

Yeah, dancing is a good compliment to aikido since both utilises aesthetic body movement. Anybody who is able to watch the latest movie by chinese director Zhang Yimou titled "House of Flying Dagger" be sure to pay close attention to the opening sequence dance scene, performed by the lead actress Zhang Ziyi, it is chinese classical dance at its zenith. Woo hoo!

Boon
(a person who loves either man or women who can dance)
:D

Luis Orozco
08-17-2004, 07:29 AM
It may not help you very much with the time constraints but capoeira is a very good to keep fit (I can't stand a gym). It's also similar to dancing :D .

In summer I do nordic rollerblading (blading with poles, 25 kms two to three times a week) and in winter I cross-country skiing (whenever possible, between 5 & 15 kms each time). Then again, I live closer to the North Pole than most of you ;) .

oudbruin
09-05-2004, 07:06 PM
Exercise, -- is a big item.
Personally, I love dance- contr-dance, scottish or playford sets is a good work out, and you have a chance to catch your breath between active sets. Actually any sort of dancing square, folk country etc all are mild cardio exercise, and also have the added benefit of being great fun.
I use the rowing machine at the "Y" (an air wheel) which has a great action and feel.
I just sprang for a cheap track bike again after far too many years, away from riding a bike.
The track bike really helps with rythim, if you are pulling 90 rpm,(or whatever) you will be unable to break your cadence, riding with heavy clintcher tyres reallly helps.
I've been working on iaido kata with a subrito, my goal is 100 overhead strikes without a pause.--than moving to the rest of the muso shindo ryu...than when you go back to your normal iaito, it's effortless.
-I started in the spring at 280 and am down to 235 headed to 175.
Weight watchers has a few valid points, portion control, journaling and paying attention to what you eat are a great way to keep off the lbs.
protein is harder to burn off than carbs so if you eat a lot of high protein foods and restrict your carb intake, the lbs will stay away even in the absense of exercise.
Lastly, I have made it a point to avoid etoh, it is not needed caloric intake but also expensive and I'd rather save my money for a nice nihonto!!!
good luck with the exercise and don't forget to warm up.
Bruce Hammell

shihonage
09-05-2004, 07:20 PM
I'm trying to start jogging again, yay !

I've probably "started" jogging more times than some people have quit smoking.

Infamousapa
09-05-2004, 10:53 PM
Everyone has to understand that Aikido is a martial art.And with every martial art in every style you must work on your body..I mean yeah a lot of you guys talk about dancing jogging,which is great but you must train the body and keep structure of your temple..I mean sure woman and men are going to have different agenda of workouts.But different strokes for different folkes,Train and listen to your body,Me myself from my heredity am a very strong man,However i must know my limits.I am currently training to be more flexible(the area that i need help in)But at the same time i lift weights to maintain the strength god gave me..What im trying to say everyone is going to work in areas they need help in and listen to your body and work on your weaknisses..

jonreading
09-08-2004, 11:38 AM
Good comments Tony,
Training is different for everyone, and some people like different things. The important thing is that you do something that you can regularly follow and develop a routine that fits your schedule. I have heard some comments about "starting" excercise programs several times; excercise programs that don't develop into routines often die hard.

My policy is that physical training takes place off the mat. When asked, I generally promote a solid militaristic routine: push-ups, sit-ups, chin-ups and running. Nothing fancy, but I can do it every day without fail, and it only takes about 30 minutes to run a quick mile and squeeze out some reps before class..

Tatiana
09-08-2004, 12:29 PM
Hi Olivia!
I can't speak for myself, but my friend Does Aikido, and he does swimming, gym, and weight lifting. But then we do aikido at night, and he goes to school during the day... :p Hope I could be of some help... ;)

Tatiana
09-08-2004, 12:33 PM
Capoeira??? They have capoeira up in Finland??? Kewl! Never thought they would! Though I find capoeira can be useful, its a bit too... Err.... They concentrate more on the "Plastic" (looks) than the actual "dance"....

It may not help you very much with the time constraints but capoeira is a very good to keep fit (I can't stand a gym). It's also similar to dancing :D .

suren
09-08-2004, 03:25 PM
I really wish I had some time to restore my yoga practice, but I don't.

Nick Simpson
09-08-2004, 06:58 PM
I find running/cycling alongside a regime of weights, situps, crunches, push ups & pull ups, as well as lots of bokken cuts with a suburi bokken to be good exercise outside of aikido (at least for me).

Dazzler
09-09-2004, 05:40 AM
I cycle these days to keep my fitness going plus heavy bag and sparring.

At our summer school 2 years ago someone asked Pierre Chassang what excercises he recommended for warm ups and to compliment aikido practice.

His answer was 'the gymnastics for aikido is the aikido'.

I've interpreted this as a message to adjust your style of practice to produce the type of work out.

If you want a good solid workout then the standard kotai practice with partner taking a very firm grip is good.

For more aerobic work the more flowing jutai practice will be good.

Recently we've spent a lot of time using atemi to create a response from uke and using this to practice dynamically. eg we'll perform ikkko ura from shomen uchi then as uke is rising we'll atemi and use the defending arm for iikyo omote, and again, and again and so on.

This provides a very dynamic workout, the precision goes astray a little but small sacrifice if your looking to develop some fitness. I'd say its a lot closer to the 'alive' practice extolled by the NHB guys since you don't get the perfect attacks that you normally get in the dojo - this can be good since you develop fast responses to the imperfections.

Try it...! Its great for excercise and can generate a real buzz in what can sometimes be a very restrained atmosphere.

Regards

D

Tamarack
09-09-2004, 06:17 AM
yoga,yoga,yoga! I can't stretch enough. :p

I would love to be able to swim!! But the sea is a filthy place these days, and a sight too cold without the dry suit!!

Dancing is good for the heart - and that needs exercise too.

markwalsh
09-09-2004, 08:47 AM
Depends what you want? By "general fitness" you might well mean areobic endurance. For this anything that raises the heart/breathing rate and can be done for over 20 min, such as swimming, running, hill walking, dancing, horizontal dancing (ok maybe less than 20 min).

As someone said, Aikido (particualry ukemi) should keep you pretty fit!

For muscle definition I can't help ya, not a body builder, a progressive weights regime I guess, though I'm not so sure that'd be good for your Aikido. Maybe a dictionary :)

On a personal note I think you can exercise every muscle in your body, just using your own body. Gyms are a waste of time. Nature provides :)

Mark
x

Aikidoiain
09-26-2004, 02:17 PM
I could also do with some advice on this matter. Unfortunately, I'm housebound (reasons mentioned elsewhere) and can only attend the local Aikido club because it's a short walk from my flat.

Any exercise has to be in the flat. I do have weights and a bench and used to be very fit and did weight-lifting, but now I get very little exercise at all and Aikido really kills me.

Motivation is a problem too - any suggestions?

Iain. :ki: :)

Mel Barker
09-26-2004, 05:13 PM
Motivation is a problem too - any suggestions?:ki: :)
Require yourself to go down the stairs and back up between each post on Aikiweb (and any other board) keep a running total on each subsequent post so we can check up on you.

Mel