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David Humm
07-23-2004, 05:31 PM
2005 will be my 17th year in Aikido. With the exception of a couple of years where, I felt I needed to take time out.

I've always had the ambition to train at Hombu Dojo and I hope to realise this next near.

I'm wondering if I may draw upon this board's members to gain advice upon this venture, where to stay in Tokyo, and the various in's and out's of making a trip of this nature.

I can speculate on what's required but I would graciously welcome any and all input advice on the matter.

Thanks in advance.

saltlakeaiki
07-23-2004, 05:50 PM
The place where help might be most needed is in finding a place to stay. I wish I could be more helpful in that area, but since I lived in Tokyo it wasn't an issue :) However if I were to say, I'd say if you want to try to conserve cash, you could try the Tokyo Int'l Youth Hostel, which is in the upper part of a hi-rise, and actually is pretty close to Hombu (Iidabashi). Youth hostels are tough when it comes to privacy and peace of mind viz. personal items, but it's an option. If I recall from years ago, they have a nice bath :)

As for Hombu, by all means don't forget to bring your yuudansha passport or some other proof of Aikikai affiliation. If you're not affiliated, you may have trouble getting in. It costs 1,575 yen to get in for the day (about US$15 - even for Aikikai members), but you can stay for multiple classes. Don't be disappointed that it's a concrete box :) Don't be intimidated, but if you pass Doshu in the hall, make sure to nod and say hi :)

Charles Hill
07-23-2004, 09:42 PM
Hi Dave,

There is a guest house you might want to look into called Liberty House. It's a total dump but it is about a 15 minute walk from Honbu and the manager, Masa, is the sweetest guy. They will probably want you to stay at least amonth but you may be able to talk them into a shorter stay. Unlike the place Dave I. recommended, they don"t have a bath but a shower where you may have to wait in a long line. But hey, you're there to train, not to smell good, right? :)

Charles Hill

saltlakeaiki
07-24-2004, 11:45 AM
Hey Charles,
Is that the sort of place which is known as a "gaijin house"? I've heard of them but never seen one. How much does it cost to stay? On a trip back to Tokyo a couple years ago I stayed for the first time in a capsule hotel :cool: An interesting experience to be sure... but I didn't recommend it to David because I think you'd have trouble without language skills.

Dave

David Humm
07-24-2004, 03:01 PM
Thanks for your comments thus far guys

p00kiethebear
07-24-2004, 04:56 PM
Stay at a Nichiren or Nipponzan Myohoji temple. Or any other buddhist temple. They are in most cases kind to visitors and have reasonable prices. (20 - 30$ a night) The only catch is that you SHOULD (out of kindness and respect) attend their morning and evening services.

batemanb
07-26-2004, 01:29 AM
As for Hombu, by all means don't forget to bring your yuudansha passport or some other proof of Aikikai affiliation. If you're not affiliated, you may have trouble getting in. It costs 1,575 yen to get in for the day (about US$15 - even for Aikikai members), but you can stay for multiple classes. Don't be disappointed that it's a concrete box :) Don't be intimidated, but if you pass Doshu in the hall, make sure to nod and say hi :)

I wouldn't let being a non aikikai member put you off, they let me in on my first visit to Japan back in '95. I would take some evidence of your association (members card) even if they are not affiliated, at least to show that you do practice aikido somewhere. The biggest hurdle will be the language barrier at the door.

rgds

Bryan

saltlakeaiki
07-27-2004, 10:40 AM
Yes, it seems that there is an element of randomness/luck to it for non-Aikikai members, and it also seems that if you put on a good act of looking like you've been there many times before and know the ropes (doudouto, as the J say), it will help you bluster your way past any suspicions ;) I can guarantee that a nice hearty "ohayou gozaimasu!" (or other greeting appropriate to the time of day) and a smile will help, too! You're most likely to be questioned if you have the look of someone from a "questionable" style of Aikido who's trying to slip in even though he knows he's not welcome :) So have your Y1575 ready in exact change when you walk in :)

So..... is there anything we haven't hit on that is still troubling you, Dave?

laovel
07-27-2004, 04:38 PM
This was written a bit ago but may have something useful for you

http://www.koryubooks.com/library/mskoss6.html

GAMBATTE