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Elrond
06-25-2004, 06:59 AM
I have just wondered that is there anybody who attempts an extra martial art besides aikido for I want to learn kung fu as well. is there any drawback for me in that ı can mix up the techniques or so on ?.

Bridge
06-25-2004, 07:32 AM
Hello,
Seems like you are well aware of all the benefits of another art. I can speak from a different perspective. Aikido is my "extra" martial art. My main one is karate due to the way my schedule works out. I can't speak for king fu but in my experience...

There are a couple of drawbacks depending on what art you try.

If you are put under a lot pressure, you will find you will revert to training i.e. do what comes most naturally. In your case that would be an aikido technique. Which most instructors will accept. Some schools are a bit snobby and will be upset that you even dained to do something that is not theirs, even if you are under pressure. I found this when I went to a tae kwon do club, but I think it was just that particular club rather than the art itself.

There is the added bonus of having that extra set of techniques up your sleeve, should you get stuck! And it's always nice to see the many different ways of dealing with an attack.

So long as you make the instructor aware that you have done aikido before, and if you really apply yourself to learning what THEY are teaching you, you will be fine.

When you do go to a different dojo please make sure you do not make comparisons with aikido techniques e.g. "Oh, in aikido we do it this way...". They may not take kindly to it. At least wait until they get to know you a bit before saying anything!

Just say as little as possible at first and be as humble as you can.

All the best!

SeiserL
06-25-2004, 08:41 AM
I still train in FMA/JKD.

Keep the arts separate. Let them integrate themselves.

IMHO, martial arts complement each other. They all have weaknesses and all have something of value.

Ron Tisdale
06-25-2004, 10:51 AM
I'd have to say that Lynn's opinion is similar to mine. I choose Daito ryu for now as my 'cross training' art, and the relationship between the two arts has so far been of great benefit to my aikido, even though I do my best to keep the two separate. The principles I learn in Daito ryu often leak into my aikido, usually in a positive way.

In terms of adopting things in kung fu for your aikido technique...don't force it. Just train, if there are benefits from the training they'll most likely show up naturally.

Ron

kklipsch
06-25-2004, 01:41 PM
Danzan Ryu jujitsu is my "other" Art.

1. I believe in cross-training, if I didn't I wouldn't do it.

2. Do not let your Aikido turn into a hybrid too fast. Keep them seperate as much as possible.

3. Do not go into your other art with an Aikido mind. Learn as much as possible as if you were a new student to martial arts.

4. Do not go into your Aikido with an other art mind. Learn as much as possible as if you were a new student to martial arts.

5. Don't get involved in "which art is better" conversations. My standard response is, "which is better, a screw driver or a hammer?"

6. Your arts will integrate, don't force it, don't fight it, just train.

Having given some general ideas about cross training, let me tell you, that yes I do "mix" up techniques at times. Yes, it does cause me to learn some things slower (in both arts), and yes I sometimes have problems distinguishing one of my arts from the other. But, to be honest, my biggest conflict is time. I want to move forward in both, but I have a finite amount of time to give to either. So I must chose, and sometimes one art or the other does get neglected for awhile, making my progress in that art slower.

Good luck.

Jorx
06-27-2004, 09:59 AM
I too believe in crosstraining...

It all comes down what do you want to accomplish by it?

If you want to learn cool martial arts that are interesting then very well, take wu-shu if you want to...

If you want to improve your general fighting ability, take a very different path from aikido - take a competitive, physical art - MMA, Muay Thai, Western Boxing, BJJ etc.

My two euros...

Geoff Flather
06-29-2004, 12:30 PM
With respect to the writers before me, I do not feel it necessary to cross train.

Aikido as I have received it, has taken into account the differences that you seem to seek in other martial arts. I also, similar to others, found that Aikido has protected me on the Streets, on more than one occasion.

Keith_k
06-29-2004, 11:15 PM
If you are going to cross train I suggest picking another art which covers the weakness of your current art. If your primary art is Aikido I think you should chose your secondary art as either a heavy striking art (perhaps kick boxing) or a ground-fighting art (perhaps BJJ) as these are two areas that are lacking or de-emphasized in Aikido. I don't have much familiarity with kung-fu so I couldn't give a good opinion of how these two would mesh.

Keith

wxyzabc
06-29-2004, 11:50 PM
I suggest Karate...this is a very good for learning how to attack effectively...the added flexibility you will acquire can only be a good thing too..

Generally in the dojo very few Uke attack effectively...a bit of sparring in Karate will really open your eyes.. :)

NagaBaba
07-01-2004, 01:41 PM
Judo is The Best.

MitchMZ
07-02-2004, 01:32 PM
I think Hapkido. Very strong strikes and a lot of the same principles, movements, and techniques as Aikido. Hapkido is what many people call, "Aikido with attitude."

Michael Neal
07-02-2004, 02:25 PM
Judo, no question

Keith_k
07-02-2004, 05:04 PM
I think Hapkido. Very strong strikes and a lot of the same principles, movements, and techniques as Aikido. Hapkido is what many people call, "Aikido with attitude."

I study Hapkido. It has a very strong Aikijujutsu base and many of the techniques, principles and movements are identical or nearly identical. It is because of this that I would say that Hapkido is NOT a good cross training art for Aikido. A person would be re-learning the exact same things, which would defeat the purpose of cross training to begin with (and they might like it better and never go back :p ).

I personally think that Brazilian Jujutsu is a more effective ground art than Judo, but the "the way" of Judo and emphasis on warrioor spirit may apeal more to an Aikidoka than BJJ, where most instructors are more interested in preparing some young brave/foolish man to enter a cage than any spiritual development.

Jordan Steele
07-02-2004, 11:10 PM
Cross training does nothing but good. Picking one that will not interfere with your primary art can sometimes be a challenge though. I trained wing chun and aikido for a while and now just aikido but they were a good fit.

Bronson
07-03-2004, 01:39 AM
I find iaido fits nicely with aikido.

I'd like the chance to try ikebana (http://www.ikebanahq.org/) and chado (http://www.sg.emb-japan.go.jp/JapanAccess/sado.htm).

Bronson

Charles Hill
07-03-2004, 04:59 AM
Not a martial art, but I highly recommend learning to play jazz or at least become more familiar with it. There are a lot of overlaps with the emphasis on first learning forms and then breaking free to find one`s own voice. Just a thought.

Charles Hill

jamara
07-04-2004, 10:47 AM
I personally would suggest that if you want to cross train, something like kick boxing would be good for you because it covers ground that aikido does not and the techniques will not be easily confused. also when sparing you will get a better idea of how people will actually attack you (have you ever received a realistic attack in aikido?)

saltlakeaiki
07-04-2004, 01:08 PM
I would like to agree with those who have suggested non-martial arts as a complement to aikido. I have done some "oshuuji" (you don't really get to call it "shodo" until you're pretty good :)), i.e. Japanese calligraphy, and although I didn't do it long or intensively enough to see any real reflection in my aikido, I could see (and feel) immediately its potential and the deep similarity with martial arts. Right now I don't really have the time or physical or mental space to continue, but I know I will pick it up again some day.

kidoman
07-04-2004, 11:59 PM
Cross training can be a help, or hindrance. If you have not trained for a long period of time, it can confuse and frustrate a person. Why not emerge yourself into Aikido with all it has to offer. When you are ready to train in another art, you will know what it is without asking.

xuzen
07-05-2004, 03:31 AM
Aikido + Iaido + Kyudo + Judo = Bliss
I only wish there are 100 hours in a day, 24 days in a week and 250 weeks in a year. So much to learn, so little time. Sigh...

Reality check:
24 hour in a day, 7 days in a week, 4 weeks in a month, 12 months in a year. Minus the amount of time for sleeping, eating, earning a living (working) = soooooo little time left. Double sigh!!!

Peter Seth
07-05-2004, 06:36 AM
Any or most of the 'chinese' arts are fine, as most of them are complementary in content (even the so called 'hard' styles). My research and practice over many years has brought me to the conclusion that Aikido is a synthesis of many arts, with the essence being drawn from the chinese arts.
Osensei spent a lot of time in china where I believe he studied the subtle way chinese arts understand and manipulate Chi/ki, rather than the 'in your face' arts usually identified with japan. This I feel he incorporated into his japanese arts to eventually 'see' that martial arts - defence/attack are all the same. It is the harmony of the energy at the correct time which allows (not victory or defeat - for both are negative in their own way), but harmony and reconciliation which is the only real positive state for 'life'.
So go for it - cross training is essential for any true martial artist.
Pete

spin13
07-05-2004, 01:13 PM
This falls in line with what Peter is mentioning above and I am surprised nobody has mentioned it yet. Though my time aikido is just beginning and I have no direct experience with T'ai Chi, I would think the two would complement each other. Push hands sounds like a wonderful way to learn both about your opponent and yourself, both through the cultivation of your ability to sense chi/ki and your ability to direct it.

-spin

Jeanne Shepard
07-06-2004, 01:22 AM
Any kind of dancing with a partner, ballroom or swing. You learn the importance of good connection and it gets you out of the dojo, once in a while.

Jeanne :p

Robert Townson
07-06-2004, 05:41 AM
At the moment I practice Aikido and Iaido (main cos I like the sword, mmmmm sword...).
When I started I didn't really see it as cross training, but I suppose the stuff I learn it one helps me in some aspects of another. Although I does hinder is some instance to start off with.

I think cross training is a good idea. Like other people have said, it can fill the gap which are not covered by Aikido. What I do think is that you get a strong base in one art before starting another one.

For example spend a couple of years getting the basics of Aikido, before starting something else like Wing Chun or Karate for striking or BJJ or JJ for grappling and ground fighting.

I know someone that is trying to learn JKD, Aikido, Kick Boxing and Kung Fu! I think that is a bit much!!

xuzen
07-30-2004, 03:04 AM
Dear friends,

Pardon, for bringing up an old thread. I was never confounded with this problem until now. A while ago my while chatting with my sensei off mat, I casually asked him about if there is any necessity, what art would be good compliment with aikido.

Without any hesitation, he said kendo. So there I go, whenever I have time (when I am early for class), I would invite my sempai to spar, kendo style. We are never formally coached in the art of kendo, we were more like kidding around.

It has been a month plus now since the day we started to kid around. I have noticed that my forearm is more muscular and my grips are stronger. My upper torso has also becomes more muscular. My movement has become lighter and the lunge and retreat are quicker.

According to my sensei, he said kendo is a good compliment to aikido to develop explosive power something which normal aikido training lacks. This also helps with atemi he added. Besides when attacking and being attacked by a weapon is a great confidence booster.

Anyway the above is my rant. Any cross trainer (kendoka) in this forum to share his/her experience? With such beneficial effect at such a short time, I am tempted to take up kendo as a second art in future.

Arigato for your attention,
Boon.

GLWeeks
07-30-2004, 02:43 PM
I studied Karate in my early years... From age 13 to 18 (I'm 36 now), and I started taking Aikido a little over a year ago. I've been working in some Kali training when my schedule will allow... Only thing is that I refuse to give up any of my Aikido time, so I usually get my Kali in either before or after Aikido class...

Dario Rosati
07-30-2004, 04:40 PM
Anyway the above is my rant. Any cross trainer (kendoka) in this forum to share his/her experience? With such beneficial effect at such a short time, I am tempted to take up kendo as a second art in future.


If you're interested in kenjutsu, I would pick Katori or Kashima Shinto Ryu (and probably will, next year), Iaido is a plus.
Kendo is too "sportly" IMHO and has lost many martial aspects; the fact that you wear armor alters heavily the perception of being striked, and this clashes heavily with aikido principles IMHO (where you have to avoid and blend, NEVER block or take a hit).

In this my first year of aikido I've attended some seminars where a cross-trainer sensei showed KSR stuff in an Aikido perspective, and it was enlightening and damn interesting... it greatly helps to understand many aikido tai-jutsu techinques.

It is better than "normal" aikido-ken IMHO, which is slower and more circular... but you don't want to be circular when you face a sword wielding foe, you want to be quick and efficient. This is what I perceived and I liked that a lot.

Just my 2 cents.

Michael Neal
07-30-2004, 09:30 PM
Turkish Oil Wrestling is a good choice

Jorge Garcia
07-30-2004, 09:47 PM
I think Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu Roppokai best compliments Aikido for the following reasons. 1) Daito ryu is the parent art of aikido and gives the aikidoists a look into the basis of our art. 2) All the Aikido techniques are already in its second level curriculum and many of the movements are similar or easily learned. 3) The upper level of the curriculum is what Aikido actually advertises which is minimal effort moving a larger person (with techniques and methods unknown to Aikidoists). 4) Most aikidoists are looking for the essence of Aiki. If it exits anywhere else that we can apply it to what we already know, this would be the place.
Best

jsuaikido
08-05-2004, 04:54 PM
I think it is a strange thought to begin with. I mean, any other type of artists do and learn several arts. There are probably not too many sculptors out there discussing if they should or should not try to learn "another" art like drawing or photography. Art is art to me. The art is in the individual, not what we call it. Just a thought. I think what I do is jazz. HA. That sounded humble.

senseimike
08-06-2004, 04:36 PM
I've tried everything that was available to train in. Had some success with kung fu, JKD, and jujitsu. As far as striking arts, the best one for me was Muay Thai, due to the close fighting and low kicks, it just fit better with my style. I was a wrestler before I started aikido so I was already comfortable being close to an opponate. I wouldn't suggest trying to cross train early in your training personally. I tried and it lead to confusion. Get a strong base in one art (what ever it might be) then branch out. I've also trained a bit in iaido and know some other folks who have taken it further than I did. This seems to be good, but these guys all started sword training after testing to the shodan level. One art that we have cross trained in that compliments aikido fairly well is cuong nhu, a Vietnamese art. www.cuongnhu.com for info and locations. It uses elements of aikido as well as other throwing and striking arts.

senseimike
08-06-2004, 04:42 PM
Any kind of dancing with a partner, ballroom or swing. You learn the importance of good connection and it gets you out of the dojo, once in a while.


I've tried this...... caught a few ladies in a sankyo when spinning them....

Peter Seth
08-20-2004, 06:47 AM
Kendo is brilliant for strengthening and focussing your strength, and its movements (Saburi) are also one of the (basiis?) of aikido, so go for it. But, try not to develop too much strength/energy as aikido is a balance of hard and 'soft'. Sometimes not always appreciated!

Cyrijl
08-23-2004, 12:03 PM
I personally think that Brazilian Jujutsu is a more effective ground art than Judo, but the "the way" of Judo and emphasis on warrioor spirit may apeal more to an Aikidoka than BJJ, where most instructors are more interested in preparing some young brave/foolish man to enter a cage than any spiritual development.
This is ridiculous.
At any rate, cross training can provide benefits more often than costs. Try to find aonother art inline with your thinking, and not inline or complementing your current style. Think about what you want to achieve. Tai chi might be a good option if you are looking for relaxation and health, Judo might be good if you are looking for self-defense. If an aikido techniques does not work for you, you are close enough for a judo throw. If you need to be 'a little more in the mix' then Muay Thai or BJJ might be good for you since they give you a realistic environment missing in many aikido dojo.

--edited for spelling

Paul D. Smith
09-02-2005, 08:48 AM
Just came across this. I guess I am a traditionalist. I think any art can hold a lifetime of deep learning in it. One can spend 40 years perfecting kokyunage - and that alone can take one's entire pursuit. Nothing wrong with cross training, of course (although I wouldn't do it until one has a solid foundation in one's primary art first), but I just see so much, in this instance, in Aikido, to take me the years of my life remaining to work on singlemindedly.

Pdella
09-02-2005, 01:08 PM
I'm trying to decide between Danzan Ryu Jujitsu and Judo as a secondary martial art, to supplement my Aikido training. Any thoughts on that?

By the way, there are a ton a older discussions about cross training, other arts, etc. so anyone who asks anything about this should really search the archives first.

Pdella
09-02-2005, 01:09 PM
I've tried this...... caught a few ladies in a sankyo when spinning them....

damn. that could turn a good night into a bad one real quickly.

aikigirl10
09-02-2005, 05:10 PM
I do Kung fu and its awesome. Its totally different from aikido which is what i love. kung fu , is more offensive, where aikido is more defensive. In kung fu (shaolin is the style) we do ground fighting, tons of weapons, kata forms, different animal forms, competetions, tai chi, and things derived from tae kwon do. Its very effective, and it will give u the work out of your life.

If there is one martial art i can recommend to you besides aikido , it would be shaolin kung fu.

Please check it out.
-Paige