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grasshopper73
06-04-2004, 06:30 PM
Today in class was the first time that I've done the 8 direction cut with bokken. Could someone please direct me to a resource (hopefully on-line) that details the steps so I may practice this at home ?

Appreciate any help

aikidoc
06-04-2004, 07:27 PM
I don't know about online but I believe it is in Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere. The way I help students remember it is you cut to the four walls and then cut to 4 corners.
1. Shomenuchi strike with tsuki, pivot 180 degrees to right (clockwise)
2. Cut shomenuchi and then tsuki.
3. Pivot to the left 90 degrees and cut then tsuki.
4. Pivot 180 cut and tsuki.
5. step to left 45 degrees and cut.
6. Pivot 180 degrees to right and cut
7. Step to left 90 degrees and cut
8. Pivot 180 and cut.

There is the 8 directions. There may be variations or it may be done without the bokken.

Hope it helps (I think I got it right :).

John

grasshopper73
06-04-2004, 08:08 PM
John,

Thank you very much. I have a question about step one. If I remember correctly, I had thought that we turned counter clockwise from 1 to 2.

I am picking up Dynamic Sphere tommorow so I will defintely check it out.

Thanks again.

aikidoc
06-04-2004, 10:58 PM
The way I learned it was Shomenuchi cut; step with left foot and tsuki on right side of body. Then pivot 180 degrees to right. This makes you end up like you would if you started happo undo out from a left foot forward position. I imagine others do it differently.

MaryKaye
06-04-2004, 11:01 PM
Something I was taught that seems to be common in other dojo as well:

When you are standing in hanmi (one foot forward) you have an "open side" to which it's natural to turn. If your left foot is forward, it's natural to turn to your right. All of the turns in the eight-directions pattern are to your open side.

Our eight-directions sword form starts in right hanmi (because all sword moves start in right hanmi for us) and has a left-foot step in the first tsuki, but all subsequent tsuki-steps are with the forward foot. This is a bit tricky, and different from our open-hand eight directions (which starts left hanmi). Also, the diagonal turn-and-cut moves are not four all the same but two pairs, a shallow one and then a deeper one.

If all else fails, what I always tell myself at this point is "They're bound to teach it again, and you'll get more of it the second time."

Mary Kaye

batemanb
06-05-2004, 01:59 AM
Just to confuse further, the way I was taught in Japan and teach at my club.

Start in migi hanmi (right)
Slide the right foot forward and cut shomen uchi with the right hand.
Pivot 180 degrees, slide the left foot and cut shomen uchi with the left hand.
Pivot 90 degrees to your right (open side Mary ;), Left side from start John ;))
Slide the back foot (right) into migi hanmi as you pivot and cut with the right hand.
Pivot 180 degrees, slide the left foot and cut shomen uchi with the left hand.
Pivot 45 degrees to your right and slide the right foot into migi hanmi as you turn, cutting shomen with your right hand.
Pivot 180 degrees, slide the left foot and cut shomen uchi with the left hand.
Pivot 90 degrees to your right
Slide the back foot (right) into migi hanmi as you pivot and cut with the right hand.
Pivot 180 degrees, slide the left foot and cut shomen uchi with the left hand.
Pivot back 135 degrees to your right putting you back in migi hanmi right where you started :).

In Japan my sensei taught this as Aiki ken, therefore all moves were done left and right, even though ken jutsu is only done with the right. To do the same exercise from the left, just reverse the instructions.

rgds

Bryan

aikidoc
06-05-2004, 07:52 AM
Mary's point is well taken-always turn to the open side.

When doing it without a weapon, in hidari hanmi for example, you will pivot to the right and step with the left.

aikidoc
06-05-2004, 07:57 AM
P.S. I'm describing this the way AAA does it .

akiy
06-05-2004, 09:40 AM
Since I'm currently sitting at the dojo computer typing this, I just went and tried a "contrary" eight directional cut series wherein I always turned to the "closed" side. Quite interesting, actually, with 270 degree turns (rather than 90) at some places. I've also done the eight directional cur series but, rather than stepping/sliding forward each time, stepping/sliding back. Heck, I've even done this mirror imaged, both with the hands holding the bokuto in the usual "correct" position as well as "switched" (ie left hand over right).

The way I see it, these exercises offer me a way to "condition" my body (and mind!) to move more naturally in many different ways. Although just doing the "traditional" method over and over again is, I believe, a very good exercise in an of itself, I think modifying it to work on different manners of moving (and thinking) is a good thing. Other approaches include doing solo jo suburi/kata (a la Saito sensei) switching left and right sides, trying to do them backwards, adding body pivots and turns in the 31 kata, and so on.

Heretically,

-- Jun

Zoli Elo
06-05-2004, 06:09 PM
You are a mind reader Jun!

I was just going to post, after reading the start of this thread earlier, that going through various iterations (left foot foreword, right turn; left foot foreword, left turns; right foot foreword, right turns, ...) are an excellent way to "condition" both mind and body.

Charles Hill
06-05-2004, 11:14 PM
If all else fails, what I always tell myself at this point is "They're bound to teach it again, and you'll get more of it the second time."


I think you should follow this advice. What happens if you get instruction from another source and it`s different than what is done at your dojo? You might be more confused than ever.

Charles Hill

grasshopper73
06-06-2004, 11:45 AM
I'm probably just over-eager. I have to remind myself to slow down and enjoy the ride. I will be able to ask for help this coming Wednesday from one of my Sensei's. The threads above have helped though.

Thanks