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Usagi Yojimbo
05-16-2004, 05:45 PM
Umm, can anyone here give me some insight upon this style (Niten Ichi-ryu)? I've been doing Aikido for just a little while, like 9 months or something, but the bokken techniques immediately sparked my interest in the beginning, of course. Since then, I've been trying to learn more of the sword techniques but we only practice those a few times a month, and I don't always get to make it to those classes. So while I'm eager to learn mastery of the sword, I've also been looking into other martial arts that rely upon weapons. So far I've come across Kendo, Iaido, Niten Ichi-ryu, and Jodo. I've never heard of Jodo before, so an explanation into this would be most welcome. Other than the Jodo stuff, is there anything I should know about the other three? I've heard mixed reviews of Niten Ichi-ryu, and I keep coming across "Hyo Ho Niten Ichi-ryu", is there a difference between the two?

Tommy_S
05-16-2004, 06:31 PM
.... I've never heard of Jodo before, so an explanation into this would be most welcome....Jodo = the way of the stick (jo is a stick about 125 cm in length; also a weapon sometimes used in Aikido practice....)... :confused:

ryujin
05-16-2004, 06:52 PM
A search on the internet will provide more info, but in short, the Hyoho Niten Ichiryu was developed by Miyamoto Musashi. The school dates from the early 1600s and its most distinctive feature is its concurrent use of both the long and short swords. The current headmaster of the school is Imai Masayuki judai. There are three sets of practice, Itto Seiho (long sword against long), Kodachi Seiho (short sword against long) and Nito Seiho (two swords against long sword).

Bronson
05-17-2004, 11:19 AM
Hmmm, found this (http://www.hyoho.com/Hyoho1.html) in my bookmarks.

Here's a link to an article by Dave Lowry on The Evolution of Classical Jojutsu (http://www.koryubooks.com/library/dlowry11.html) at Koryu Books (http://www.koryubooks.com).

Bronson

Usagi Yojimbo
05-17-2004, 05:12 PM
Thanks for the replies. I drew the connection between the big stick, Jo, and the Jodo style, but I didn't want to jump to conclusions. Have any of you had much experience with Niten Ichi-ryu, Iaido, and Kendo? And do you think it would be worth the effort to find a Dojo/Instructor and actually attempt to master these styles? And if so, what organization would I look to so I could validate the instructors? Or should I not have too?

Noel
05-17-2004, 09:03 PM
University of Guelph (Ontario) has a Niten Ichi group. You can also check Kim Taylor's stuff, I know he has a book that describes some of the kata.

-Noel

akiy
05-17-2004, 10:59 PM
You can also check Kim Taylor's stuff, I know he has a book that describes some of the kata.
Yup. I picked it up from him last November. I have it around here somewhere... If I'm not mistaken, Kim is the only "licensed" teacher of Niten Ichi Ryu in North America.

-- Jun

Usagi Yojimbo
05-20-2004, 04:39 PM
So how hard would it be to find an instructor for any of those sword arts in Japan? How about a GOOD, reliable, possibly certified (which organization would be best?) sword instructor in japan? And how can I know I'm talking to the right guy when I do find a new instructor? Is there an Iaido, Kendo, or Hyo Ho Niten Ichi-ryu organization or federation headquartered in Japan with reliable credentials that I should know about?

Largo
05-20-2004, 07:59 PM
It's not easy. Regular kendo is like little league over here. Most kids do it in gym class, and if they do it as an after school sport, they are usually shodan around the second year of middle school. As for kenjutsu or any older type of thing, I think you'd need an introduction, or at least someone who can tell you where a place is. Other than that, you'd just have town gyms, budokans, or dojos from phone books.

Kent Enfield
05-21-2004, 04:59 PM
What's the particular fascination with Hyoho Niten Ichi Ryu? It's not like it's some sort of super school, whose students can split boulders just by looking at them. It's just one of the numerous koryu sword schools still extant in Japan, many of which also contain nito in their curriculums. If you're moving to Japan and have your choice of where, that's one thing, but the idea of relocating to study a school you've never practiced under a teacher you've never met is, well, stupid.

If you want to study a Japanese weapon art, contact a nearby kendo or iaido dojo, as those are by far what you're most likely to find, and see where it takes you. A kendo dojo should be affiliated with the International Kendo Federation, to which 99% of them belong. The IKF also has an iaido section, so many kendo dojo also practice iaido. There are also other organizations for iaido, though I am not as familiar with them. The IKF has a jodo section as well, though the All United State Kendo Federation does not, so jodo/jojutsu is quite rare in the US. Japanese weapon arts are rare outside of Japan, so see what's around you and check it out. Don't scour the internet looking for details on a specific art. There's a good chance that what you find is only practiced in one small farming village in Japan.

For kendo in Texas, a good place to start is here (http://www.kendo-usa.org/statedojolist.htm#TX).

Usagi Yojimbo
05-25-2004, 04:06 PM
Thanks for the information, and I'm not limiting myself to one art in particular. I want to at least attempt to master or become experienced/adept in as many different arts and weapons as I can. but I want to specialize in the Katana. I had already known about Kendo and Iaido, and Niten Ichi-ryu sparked my interest as something new. So really, I'm just trying to find information on organizations and the arts themselves. While I realise it's rather easy for the commentary upon one art as opposed to another to be swayed by the speakers own preferances, I'd like to learn about as many arts as possible, therebye opening up their doors to me. You can't start on a journey of knowledge if you don't know where the gate is. So thanks again for the information, and I definetly look foreward to finding some Dojo I can study in. Oh, I also remember coming across the phrase "Jaido" a short while ago. What is there to know about it? And are there still a large number of Kenjutsu styles? Either way, what are some of the main ones, or rather, which ones should I keep an eye out for or am which am I most likely to notice first? (That didn't even make a lot of sence to me, but I hope you understand what I mean)

George S. Ledyard
05-25-2004, 07:14 PM
I want to at least attempt to master or become experienced/adept in as many different arts and weapons as I can. but I want to specialize in the Katana. I had already known about Kendo and Iaido, and Niten Ichi-ryu sparked my interest as something new. So really, I'm just trying to find information on organizations and the arts themselves.


If you are serious about this you are talking about looking at the various koryu as well as the modern arts like iaido, and kendo. This means that you are going to have to look for a teacher not just find an art that sounds cool. There is a very small number of teachers qualified to teach the classical styles so you would need to be prepared to relocate if you found one who would accept you as a student (not a foregone conclusion).

First step is read everything they have on this website:
Koryu Books (http://www.koryubooks.com/)

Afeter that you will know enough to ask the proper questions.

Even the arts like iaido and kendo aren't very commercial and one might have to look hard in an area to find out who the top people are to train with (probably not the ones listed in the Yellow Pages as World Champion, Grandmaster, Sokes).

Largo
05-26-2004, 12:28 AM
I understand the desire to learn a lot of arts. However, koryu sensei are few and far between. Becoming their student would probably limit you to learning just their art, however. If you want some good info, check out koryu.com

Kouen
08-09-2004, 01:00 PM
A Hyoho Niten Ichi Ryu seminar is being held in Guelph, Ontario, by IWAMI sensei, 11th successor to MIYAMOTO MUSASHI this August. See through Kim TAYLOR's website.
A seminar will also be held near Paris, France, in october. See www.nitenryu.org for details
The best informed person for this style is Colin WATKIN, see www.hyoho.com
I have experienced the teaching of this school. I encourage those who are interested in old schools, koryu, to taste Musashi's sword, IWAMI sensei opening of his school's teaching and the enthusiasm of WATKIN sensei's to share his knowledge of swordmanship.
Many answers are to be found bokken in hand!!! ;)

NTT
08-30-2010, 04:58 AM
Back to learning is better than just reading Gorin no Sho so come to Papendal, Netherlands, September 17th, 18th and 19th to have keiko under direction of Iwami soke. See http://www.niten.nl