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Jeff Lynne
05-13-2004, 08:36 AM
I am a seasoned cyclist and have been for years. Thus, it comes as a suprise that my legs and especially my glutes are sore. Is it possible to attribute this soreness to the aikido training which I just started last week? It seems plausible, but I never felt that we did that much to cause this level of tightness. Any thoughts? :crazy:

GaiaM
05-13-2004, 08:42 AM
I am almost certain that the soreness is caused by Aikido. It seems that just about everyone who begins training gets sore, often in those areas, regardless of their athletic ability/background. When I come back from a summer of no training (guiding river trips in Alaska) I am always sore for the first week or so. It must be that rolling and falling in general use different muscles or use them differently. Don't worry, in a few weeks it will go away! Good luck with your training.
Gaia

DarkShodan
05-13-2004, 09:39 AM
I agree. I thought I was in pretty good shape when I started Aikido. I ran almost every day and did weights every other day. The first few weeks of Aikido I was very sore. Your muscles develop memory, that's no secret, and get used to working in a specific manor. But when you change the routine your muscles need time to adjust. Welcome to Aikido! Keep practicing.

Janet Rosen
05-13-2004, 12:47 PM
To what has been said, I'll add that a couple of minutes of stretching legs and glutes after class and a hot shower will both help. But you probably knew that....

Lan Powers
05-13-2004, 11:46 PM
Good to have sore legs instead of sore upper body. Using the best part of your anatomy as I have been told.
Lan

Infamousapa
05-14-2004, 12:20 AM
I feel what u are saying Jeffrey,I used to practice muay thai before and that used to get me very sore.However aikido doesnt use as much effort as muay thai but i came home as a new aikido practioner very suprised to be sore the following day.But it seemed that i was sore with muscles i have never used before..It was just a different kind of soreness but one that was pleasant and fulfilling.

actoman
05-14-2004, 04:01 AM
heck yes! I just got done with a full hour of nothing but breakfalls and I am sore as hell!

ruthmc
05-14-2004, 06:58 AM
Is the length of time the soreness lasts any indication of how used to the exercise the muscles are? F'rinstance, after Aikido I mildly ache for about 14 hours. After starting to do some crunches to sort out my stomach muscles 2 days ago, I'm still in pain. :uch:

Hope my stomach gets used to it soon!

Ruth

paw
05-14-2004, 07:22 AM
Is the length of time the soreness lasts any indication of how used to the exercise the muscles are?

What you are experiencing and what everyone is describing is delayed-onset muscle soreness or DOMS.

Here's a basic primer (http://www.physsportsmed.com/issues/1999/01_99/muscle.htm)

I'd encourage you and the others that have posted on this thread to read it and do additional research on DOMS.

Regards,

Paul

*editted for formatting*

SeiserL
05-14-2004, 08:02 AM
As a seasoned cyclist, I am sure you know that muscle soreness can be very activity specific. To be in condition for cycling does not mean your muscles are in condition for Aikido. Slight differences in movement cause the muscles to work differently, tire differently, and thus be sore differently.

Just make sure your soreness if from training, not from injury.

Other than that, get back on the mat. The soreness will leave when you body gets used to it, and then you will be sore from the next level of training.

Lyle Laizure
05-17-2004, 04:48 PM
I have had newcomers to Aikido describe their first class like being hit by a tractor. Although you may be in good shape/health keep in mind you are probably going to be using different muscles than you have before or at least using the same muscles in a different way. Nothing to worry about there.

Sue Trinidad
05-19-2004, 08:32 AM
Just further confirmation. . . first week I felt like I'd been hit by a truck--despite the fact that I scull and do yoga. Generally not sore now, unless I land wrong as uke (and as a newbie, I am still doing this quite a bit!). Hot showers and arnica have helped, though.

Jeff Lynne
05-20-2004, 01:10 PM
I finally found out what it is that is making me so sore! It's the steady jumping up after taking a fall. Essentially, I am doing 20-30 squats per night of my body weight, which is why my rear is so sore. How did I discover this? Embarassingly, trying to get up after using the bathroom, I realized the action I had taken to cause the soreness in the first place. :freaky:

Janet Rosen
05-20-2004, 04:16 PM
LOL! So, glutes and hamstrings need a good stretch after each class, between bowing out and getting off the mat!

giriasis
05-20-2004, 08:23 PM
finally found out what it is that is making me so sore! It's the steady jumping up after taking a fall. Essentially, I am doing 20-30 squats per night of my body weight, which is why my rear is so sore. How did I discover this? Embarassingly, trying to get up after using the bathroom, I realized the action I had taken to cause the soreness in the first place.

Jeffery, I discovered the same thing. When I stand up from my rolls, I'm essetially doing a leg lunge or dip. When I started working out, I started doing lots of squats and step-ups. Doing all these exercises, I've found really helped with my muscular endurance in class.

Lan Powers
05-20-2004, 09:54 PM
Damn! sore in the shoulders......instead of sore in my hips. sigh
Lan

Joezer M.
05-20-2004, 11:05 PM
I was told by a medical rehab doctor that since aikido is a high-impact activity, those not familiar with it will suffer soreness for the first couple of months but usually on the points of impact, particularly the shoulders... and if I'm not mistaken cycling isn't a high-impact sport...
What do you guys think?


Regards,
Joezer

Bronson
05-21-2004, 12:52 AM
Damn! sore in the shoulders......instead of sore in my hips. sigh
Lan

That's 'cause you're a knuckle-draggin' heavy fighter ;) Stop using your arms like kickstands and the shoulder soreness will go away :D

Bronson

Janet Rosen
05-21-2004, 02:04 AM
I was told by a medical rehab doctor that since aikido is a high-impact activity, those not familiar with it will suffer soreness for the first couple of months but usually on the points of impact, particularly the shoulders
I think that if you are impacting your shoulder that regularly, rather than endure pain for months (which seems highly unusual and I can't imagine wanting to continue training....) you should ask your sempai/sensei to watch and suggest how to correct your movements.

Green Machine
05-25-2004, 10:16 AM
HI I also do a lot of cycling a mix of road if it's dry :D or mountain bike I found that when I started doing aikido sitting in sieza for any length of time was murder. Getting up from that position put smiles across the faces of my fellow practitioners :D .My sensei said that my cycling had made my ankles strong but not very flexable, gladly I have stuck with both cycling and aikido and my legs can now handle long sesions on the mat.

So just stick with it the pain will eventually go away yours more flexably Andrew.

Terry Donaghe
06-07-2004, 09:20 AM
I was going to post a thread asking about this same issue. I just had my second class yesterday and the top fronts of my legs are screaming at me this morning. I want to go to class tommorow night. Should I just tough it out? Is there something I can do, take, use to help with the soreness between now and then?

Sue Trinidad
06-07-2004, 10:05 AM
It will get better (or at least migrate elsewhere in your body!). I have only been training for a month, and I'm much less sore now than I was the first week. But quad stretches, hot showers, and a liniment (I'm using an arnica/calendula thing, but I imainge that Tiger Balm or Ben Gay would work too) help. The occasional massage doesn't hurt, either.

Good luck!

Sue

Terry Donaghe
06-07-2004, 03:40 PM
I've read in that link above about delayed-onset muscle soreness that activity which might make the soreness worse should be avoided until the soreness goes away. Is this the right thing to do with Aikido? I really want to go to practice on Tuesday, though if I'm as sore as I am today, then things won't go so well. :D

What is the general approach to handling soreness in Aikido? Suck it up? Wait till it subsides a bit? Wait till it's gone (surely not!)?

Janet Rosen
06-07-2004, 04:17 PM
a liniment (I'm using an arnica/calendula thing, but I imainge that Tiger Balm or Ben Gay would work too) help.
It's good to sort out what you are using and why. Tiger Balm, Ben Gay and all similar "heat producing" substances are irritating surface sensory nerves, creating pain relief but not affecting the muscles.
Arnica is a homeopathic remedy. Some folks find it helpful for muscle soreness. I have found it mostly useful as an application to resolve bruising/hematomas.

Sue Trinidad
06-07-2004, 05:59 PM
I can't really say whether it's the arnica or the massaging motion I've used to apply it, but empirically, seems to be working for me! :p

Somebody more knowledgeable can probably speak to the delayed onset thing. . . as a sculler, I decided I'd just keep plugging (it's what rowers are conditioned to do). It's always been my experience that I'm more sore the day after the day after heavy work (the second day after, that would be. . .) if I don't do anything the day after the work; but I've also talked with people who are more sore the first day after.

So it turns out I'm really no help at all here, sorry. Hmm. . . maybe I will go do some gardening!