PDA

View Full Version : aikido at Waseda University


Please visit our sponsor:
 



alepkin
03-06-2004, 02:26 PM
I'll be doing a study abroad in Japan from september to march at Waseda University, and was considering studying a martial art there. Presently I've been studying Kuk Sool Won (http://www.kuksoolwon.com) (a little like Taekwondo fused with Hapkido) for about a year, but there aren't any kuk sool schools where I'll be at. Looking around for information, it seems like Waseda has a ludicrous number of clubs and circle groups, including several aikido groups. Anybody have any experience training with any of these groups? I'd figure I'd try aikikai since that's the most mainstream and I've read the most about it, but I really don't know.

batemanb
03-07-2004, 03:29 AM
I don`t know about groups in the University, but I am pretty sure that Waseda University is very close to the Aikikai Hombu dojo, why not go study there. I think that you will find the Yoshinkan Hombu very close too, another option.

Regards

Bryan

PeterR
03-07-2004, 04:13 AM
Actually Waseda Daigaku is where Tomiki formulated his ideas of Competitive Aikido while he was Professor of Physical Education there. It has a very strong group under the direction of Shishida Shihan. Also Nariyama Tetsuro (Shihan of Shodokan (Tomiki) Honbu) teaches there regularily.

They are authors of Aikido and the Competitivie Edge which is reviewed in the book section of this site.

Shodokan Honbu site is here (http://homepage2.nifty.com/shodokan/en/).

The Waseda site is here (http://www.geocities.co.jp/Colosseum/5179/).

but it is in Japanese. If you have trouble contacting let me know. However someone must speak English - I know Shishida Shihan does.

Chris Li
03-07-2004, 03:48 PM
Actually Waseda Daigaku is where Tomiki formulated his ideas of Competitive Aikido while he was Professor of Physical Education there. It has a very strong group under the direction of Shishida Shihan. Also Nariyama Tetsuro (Shihan of Shodokan (Tomiki) Honbu) teaches there regularily.
There's also a strong Aikikai group there, IIRC - one of the earliest university Aikido groups, with links to the Aikikai because Kisshomaru Ueshiba went to Waseda. Anyway, Waseda is within walking distance of Aikikai hombu. Yoshinkan hombu is a little bit further away (a short train ride).

Best,

Chris

alepkin
03-07-2004, 11:28 PM
Thanks for the info. Does anybody know how Japanese and American schools function differently? (Granted, there can be a lot of variance even between schools here.) For anyone who has trained in Japan, do you think the language barrier will be much of an issue, ie. is it possible to learn effectively monkey-see-monkey-do style? I've only been studying the language for two years, so I'm hardly conversation.

PeterR
03-07-2004, 11:37 PM
Shishida Shihan speaks wonderful English and is known as the polite face of Shodokan Aikido.

At Waseda Daigaku I guarantee English will be spoken by about 50% of the students to at least "Pass me the beer" level. I know this from direct experience. I was training with a few of them this week-end as a matter of fact.

Shodokan training and what I've experienced of Aikikai can get by on very little verbal understanding. I've trained at Shodokan Honbu for years with little or no Japanese. What you need to know is easy to pick up.

If you've taken two years of language training than you should have no problems.

mantis
03-08-2004, 02:38 PM
Tomiki Aikido was developed to teach the basics in a very short period of time. (the average stay at a university is only a few years)

It is based on Kata and consists of 17 basic techniques. I think you would get a solid foundation in this style seeing that you will not be there that long.

I've been told that Waseda also has a great Judo club. Judo can be an important addition to any martial art. It also goes hand in hand with tomiki aikido.

kendo is another club they have

PeterR
03-08-2004, 07:18 PM
Tomiki Aikido was developed to teach the basics in a very short period of time. (the average stay at a university is only a few years)

It is based on Kata and consists of 17 basic techniques. I think you would get a solid foundation in this style seeing that you will not be there that long.

I've been told that Waseda also has a great Judo club. Judo can be an important addition to any martial art. It also goes hand in hand with tomiki aikido.

kendo is another club they have
I agree with all of the above but it seems when you say consists of 17 basic techniques it sounds like all they have. The 17 basic techniques are certainly at the core of what you learn but the testing curriculum for kyu and shodan contains a lot more, not to mention other techniques outside the testing requirements. Take a look at the web site for more details.

Kensai
03-09-2004, 06:09 AM
Looks like you have a great opportunity.

Just go for it, not doubt there will be a lot of strong JMA clubs or any other national style for that matter.

As a Ki man I'm hoping to pop over to Osaka at some point to go to the Ki society HQ. You'll have to let us know how you get on.....

All the best.

M.E.Perona
07-18-2004, 12:03 PM
Hello

I will be at Waseda Daigaku from january to june 2005. I currently train in a federation directed by Tamura Shihan, and I am Shodan.

Do you think I may gain from studying Tomiki Aikido, or do you think I'd better go to an A´kika´ dojo ?

Are this two styles very different ?

--
I apologize for my poor English.

Charles Hill
07-19-2004, 05:11 AM
Hi Perona,

Waseda is about a 15 minute walk from the Aikikai Honbu Dojo. I think it would be a crime if you didn`t take advantage of it.

Charles Hill

PeterR
07-21-2004, 03:26 AM
Tomiki at Waseda is first rate - Shishida Shihan is a Professor of Budo history there and the club is a randori (what we mean by randori) powerhouse. You will gain quite a bit studying there.

However, if you have a Shodan in Aikikai my advice is to stay there. At Aikikai Honbu you will get quite a bit of variation also. I also trained under a student of Tamura sensei for a time - as a Shodokan (Tomiki) person I had no trouble fitting in but am not so sure the other way would be as easy. Quick proviso my students and visitors to my group that are at least Shodoan in Aikikai seem to enjoy Shodokan but again I'm not sure switching would be in your best interest.

M.E.Perona
09-07-2004, 03:55 PM
Thanks for yours answers.

However, would you give me the same piece of advice if I tell you that in France, A´kika´ affiliation (I do have a A´kikka´ Shodan) means little.

For exemple, my Shodan was given to me by Tamura Shihan, although the A´kikka´ representative for France is Tissier Sensei. I have also studied a bit under Chiba Sensei's students (Biranka´) and my current teacher, though a follower of Tamura Sensei, was first trained by the current head of the Takemutsu scholl.

Thus, I cannot say I am a true representative of the Aikikka´ style. That's why I'd like to learn more abour the differences between with Tomiki style.

Thank you

Hanna B
09-07-2004, 04:26 PM
Aikikai is not a style, from a technical point of view, but many. I do not think there are som many "true representatives of Aikikai style", if any.

As far as I have heard, university dojos often have other functions besides doing aikido that actually are of bigger importance; the chance of finding a truly good aikido dojo is probably greater outside of the university. Of course Waseda could be an exception.

L. Camejo
09-07-2004, 07:25 PM
From what I've seen of its head instructor, Waseda would be an exception. This is also the first Aikido dojo that Tomiki had established.

Having very recently trained with Shihan Shishida, I can truly say that the level of technical expertise and instruction to be had at Waseda is world class. If you are open to experiencing a different expression of free practice, I am sure the folks at Waseda will give you something to "sink your teeth into."

Also, as far as your Kuk Sool Won (lovely style that) experience goes, I've done some Hapkido with some of the local folks here, you may find some similarities in the way Shodokan sets up and executes techniques as well, especially the joint techniques, at least imho. Either way you can't go wrong with Waseda Aikido Club.

LC:ai::ki:

M.E.Perona
09-09-2004, 02:03 AM
I think I'll give a try to Tomiki.

It means I have a few questions abour properties : assuming I go to the dojo at Waseda,

- may I wear my hakama ?
- may I wear my black belt ?

Thank you

PeterR
09-09-2004, 02:20 AM
I think I'll give a try to Tomiki.

It means I have a few questions abour properties : assuming I go to the dojo at Waseda,

- may I wear my hakama ?
- may I wear my black belt ?

Thank you

Hi Mathieu;

Tomiki folks don't normally wear hakama. University students wear them for Embu not during practice and definitely not during randori.

Black belt. Aikikai Yudansha wear black belts when they visit me but that is my choice - I would take both white and black belt along and ask. Of course I have a small group and every knows whats what. In Tomiki Aikido wearing a black belt means you are ready for randori among some how shall I say this - enthusiastic university students. It might be in your interests to put the black belt aside - in a university club with a previous background in Aikido you will get it back pretty quick.

Can I suggest you keep a running commentary on your Tomiki adventure either this thread or start an Aikiweb journal. I would love to hear how it goes.

By the by - the Shodokan (Tomiki) curriculum is designed for putting out half decent Aikidoists in a relatively short time. The training is quite intense and focused and if you are going into that environment go through all the kyu grades - testing when everyone else does. You really wont regret it. You will run into my teacher (Nariyama Tetsuro) pretty soon - he travels North to Waseda regularily.

Cheers

M.E.Perona
09-09-2004, 02:50 PM
Hi Mathieu;

Tomiki folks don't normally wear hakama. University students wear them for Embu not during practice and definitely not during randori.


that's good to know.


Of course I have a small group and every knows whats what. In Tomiki Aikido wearing a black belt means you are ready for randori among some how shall I say this - enthusiastic university students.

Hum... I may not be quite ready for that. I will try the white belt. I like the idea of being a beginner once again.

Can I suggest you keep a running commentary on your Tomiki adventure either this thread or start an Aikiweb journal. I would love to
hear how it goes.

I'll try to do that. I will send regular update to my club's site (http://www.parisaikidoclub.com -in french-), and post english translations on a journal.

[/QUOTE]

Thank you very much.

deepsoup
09-09-2004, 03:49 PM
Hi Mathieu,

I just noticed you're based in Paris. If you'd be interested in checking out some Shodokan aikido before you go to Tokyo, it just so happens that there is a wonderful instructor in Paris. (The only Shodokan instructor in the whole of France.)

His name is Satoru Tsuchiya, he's a very nice fellow and his aikido is superb, very powerful. I don't know exactly where he teaches, but you can find his phone number here (http://homepage2.nifty.com/shodokan/fr/network/overseas_fr.html).
Next weekend (17/18/19 September), he is hosting a visit from an Aikikai instructor (who I believe is quite famous, but I'm sorry I can't remember his name), and holding a seminar. It might be an ideal opportunity to check it out.
My own instructor is going to be coming over from England to attend, and I may even be there myself (depends on some work stuff).

For general information about Shodokan (in French), the Shodokan Honbu (http://homepage2.nifty.com/shodokan/fr/index.html) website is quite informative.

I wish you the best of luck for your visit to Waseda, it should be quite an adventure. I'm looking forward to reading about it. (My French is terrible but if you don't get around to translating your journal, it would be very good practice for me to read it.)

Regards
Sean
x

maikerus
09-10-2004, 04:44 AM
Hi,

I believe that Waseda University is only 2 subway stops away from the Yoshinkan Hombu dojo, as well (maybe 3). I think it would take about 10 minutes to get there. The Yoshinkan Hombu is at Ochiai Station on the Tozai Line.

Of course, this only works if Waseda University is actually at Waseda station. I've never been to the university itself.

cheers,

--Mcihael

M.E.Perona
01-10-2005, 02:46 AM
Hello, all

I am now in Waseda (since saturday, actually), and I have found the dojo. I met someone ther, but my japanese skills were not good enough to get useful information.

Could someone tell me who to contact, or perhaps introduce me if any one of you happend to practice at Waseda ?

Thank you

PeterR
01-10-2005, 07:16 PM
Was this the Aikikai or Shodokan (Tomiki) club. By the way if you are beginning in Aikido and are going back to Paris I recomend Shodokan. There is a legendary teacher of the style in that city.

M.E.Perona
01-10-2005, 08:00 PM
I'd like to try Tomiki. I''ve heqrd thqt the Waseda club is a ;ajor one for that school.

PeterR
01-10-2005, 08:34 PM
It is - my teacher the Head Instructor of the style travels up weekly from Osaka and of course Shishida Shihan teaches there regularily.

http://www.geocities.co.jp/Colosseum/5179/

I'll phone Honbu and see if I can get you an e-mail or phone number for an English speaker. Please send me a private e-mail.

deepsoup
01-11-2005, 06:12 AM
Was this the Aikikai or Shodokan (Tomiki) club. By the way if you are beginning in Aikido and are going back to Paris I recomend Shodokan. There is a legendary teacher of the style in that city.
For what its worth, I'd like to second this. I've been to a couple of seminars taught by Mr Tsuchiya, he's an excellent teacher and an all round nice guy.

Sean
x

mj
01-11-2005, 07:30 AM
Without getting all obsequious, I too would like to commend Mr Tsuchiya.

I attended a 5 or 6 day course with him in Wales last year and have to say that his knowledge of Aikido, its history, general martial arts and so on was invigorating. A very good ambassador.

Yann Golanski
01-11-2005, 07:35 AM
Tsuchiya-san is awesome and really friendly. I'd second Sean and Peter! If you can train with him, do so.